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Ethernet connections

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Ethernet connections

Postby Steve1960 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 8:12 am

So, I now have Singtel's fibre service which means only one router for MIO TV and Internet which is in the living room.

I have used all four Ethernet ports one of which has a 15 metre cable routed to the bedroom / home office for my VOIP video phone.

I am using wireless for the laptop when in the home office but what if I wanted to connect the laptop and VOIP phone using the single Ethernet cable.

Is it possible and what equipment would I need to buy? Ethernet switch?

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Postby Steve1960 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 9:01 am

Correction it's RJ45 and cat 5 cable of course, not Ethernet!

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Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 9:23 am

Yes. Just buy a switch, plug that cable into the switch, and then plug whatever else into the other ports. Sometimes the cheap switches might not be auto-MDIX, so one port might be a dedicated uplink/crossover. Don't ask what that means, just if you plug in and don't see a link, use another port.

Also, Ethernet is the type of network, RJ45 is the type of connector, CAT5, is the standard of the cable (shielding, how the wires inside are braided, etc). You can just say "Ethernet", as all of those terms are commonly used interchangeably. Also, there's a very good chance you're actually using CAT5e or CAT6. If you're actually only on CAT5, and you're trying to push speeds over 100MB (you're probably not unless you're copying between system on your own network) you might run into issues.

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Postby Steve1960 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 9:42 am

zzm9980 wrote:Yes. Just buy a switch, plug that cable into the switch, and then plug whatever else into the other ports. Sometimes the cheap switches might not be auto-MDIX, so one port might be a dedicated uplink/crossover. Don't ask what that means, just if you plug in and don't see a link, use another port.

Also, Ethernet is the type of network, RJ45 is the type of connector, CAT5, is the standard of the cable (shielding, how the wires inside are braided, etc). You can just say "Ethernet", as all of those terms are commonly used interchangeably. Also, there's a very good chance you're actually using CAT5e or CAT6. If you're actually only on CAT5, and you're trying to push speeds over 100MB (you're probably not unless you're copying between system on your own network) you might run into issues.


Great thank you and apologies for mixing terms. I could probably get away with a simple manual switch as I can use the wireless on the laptop whilst using the video phone. I don't need to use them together. I am just looking for a way to use the cable connection for the laptop without constantly unplugging the phone.

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 10:01 am

We have fibre, and I had a trailing cable from the router off the lounge all the way to my study = ugly, dust-collector, trip hazard etc.

We've now got some set-up where the connection is routed via the existing domestic electrical mains cabling. > I plug my PC into a network cable, and on the other end I plug the cable into a little 'plug with flashing lights on' in a standard mains electrical wall socket in the study. At the other end the router has a cable into a similar 'plug with flashing lights'. HTH it works I have no idea lol... but it does, and it's not expensive to set up, maybe we paid $100-120 for three 'things'. So we have another in the bedroom so my wife can surf/watch TV on her netbook, in bed.

Seems to be a solution for how all the typical ferro-concrete here and hard angles, create havoc with simple domestic wi-fi.

Our flashing things are branded 'TP-Link'. We bought them from some reputable big (very) electrical shop up-top the Funan Centre.

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Postby Steve1960 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 10:05 am

JR8 wrote:We have fibre, and I had a trailing cable from the router off the lounge all the way to my study = ugly, dust-collector, trip hazard etc.

We've now got some set-up where the connection is routed via the existing domestic electrical mains cabling. > I plug my PC into a network cable, and on the other end I plug the cable into a little 'plug with flashing lights on' in a wall socket in the study. At the other end the router has a cable into a similar 'plug with flashing lights'. HTH it works I have no idea lol... but it does, and it's not expensive to set up, maybe we paid $100-120 for three 'things'. So we have another in the bedroom so my wife can surf/watch TV on her netbook, in bed.

Seems to be a solution for how all the typical ferro-concrete here and hard angles, create havoc with simple domestic wi-fi.

Our flashing things are branded 'TP-Link'. We bought them from some reputable big (very) electrical shop up-top the Funan Centre.


Thanks JR8 but I already (yesterday evening) did the hard work routing the cable from the living room to office / bedroom. I did this for exactly the reason you state, the WiFi signal is not great especially when doing Skype with family in the UK

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Postby Stevie_W » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 3:43 pm

For most phones that use VOIP, you make your connection to the phone as normal, and on top of that, you should be able to connect another network cable from your phone to your laptop.

All the VOIP phones i have used in the past have this capability, but i don't know if ALL VOIP phones can do this. It could save you having to buy a switch.

What make/model phone do you have?

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Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 5:11 pm

Steve1960 wrote:
JR8 wrote:We have fibre, and I had a trailing cable from the router off the lounge all the way to my study = ugly, dust-collector, trip hazard etc.

We've now got some set-up where the connection is routed via the existing domestic electrical mains cabling. > I plug my PC into a network cable, and on the other end I plug the cable into a little 'plug with flashing lights on' in a wall socket in the study. At the other end the router has a cable into a similar 'plug with flashing lights'. HTH it works I have no idea lol... but it does, and it's not expensive to set up, maybe we paid $100-120 for three 'things'. So we have another in the bedroom so my wife can surf/watch TV on her netbook, in bed.

Seems to be a solution for how all the typical ferro-concrete here and hard angles, create havoc with simple domestic wi-fi.

Our flashing things are branded 'TP-Link'. We bought them from some reputable big (very) electrical shop up-top the Funan Centre.


Thanks JR8 but I already (yesterday evening) did the hard work routing the cable from the living room to office / bedroom. I did this for exactly the reason you state, the WiFi signal is not great especially when doing Skype with family in the UK


You probably could have just bought a better wifi router, but those are admittedly expensive in Singapore. About S$300 or so, where they're less than half that on Amazon (but they won't ship them usually)

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Postby rdueej » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 6:35 pm

JR8 wrote:...
We've now got some set-up where the connection is routed via the existing domestic electrical mains cabling. > I plug my PC into a network cable, and on the other end I plug the cable into a little 'plug with flashing lights on' in a standard mains electrical wall socket in the study. At the other end the router has a cable into a similar 'plug with flashing lights'. HTH it works I have no idea lol... but it does, and it's not expensive to set up, maybe we paid $100-120 for three 'things'. So we have another in the bedroom so my wife can surf/watch TV on her netbook, in bed.
...
Our flashing things are branded 'TP-Link'. We bought them from some reputable big (very) electrical shop up-top the Funan Centre.


What you have is called a 'power line adapter'. They use the electrical mains wiring in your house as a replacement to the standard cat5 cables.

There is a possibility of a neighbour just plugging in another adapter (into their wall socket) and tapping out your signal. The signals don't cross transformers, but if your houses share other direct cabling, then it is a possibility.

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Postby x9200 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 6:58 pm

rdueej wrote:What you have is called a 'power line adapter'. They use the electrical mains wiring in your house as a replacement to the standard cat5 cables.

There is a possibility of a neighbour just plugging in another adapter (into their wall socket) and tapping out your signal. The signals don't cross transformers, but if your houses share other direct cabling, then it is a possibility.

This possibility is zero in any modern adapter. TP adapters use AES encryption IIRC and require pairing before they can be used.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 7:44 pm

Probably popular in crowded cities like HK, Delhi, Mexico city, etc.

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Postby rdueej » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 9:06 pm

x9200 wrote:
rdueej wrote:What you have is called a 'power line adapter'. They use the electrical mains wiring in your house as a replacement to the standard cat5 cables.

There is a possibility of a neighbour just plugging in another adapter (into their wall socket) and tapping out your signal. The signals don't cross transformers, but if your houses share other direct cabling, then it is a possibility.

This possibility is zero in any modern adapter. TP adapters use AES encryption IIRC and require pairing before they can be used.


I have not seen the newer versions, but good to know that such safety measures now exist.

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Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 30 Oct 2013 10:33 pm

rdueej wrote:
x9200 wrote:
rdueej wrote:What you have is called a 'power line adapter'. They use the electrical mains wiring in your house as a replacement to the standard cat5 cables.

There is a possibility of a neighbour just plugging in another adapter (into their wall socket) and tapping out your signal. The signals don't cross transformers, but if your houses share other direct cabling, then it is a possibility.

This possibility is zero in any modern adapter. TP adapters use AES encryption IIRC and require pairing before they can be used.


I have not seen the newer versions, but good to know that such safety measures now exist.


The ones I had in 2006 did this. It was only DES, but good enough to prevent what you describe.

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Postby Steve1960 » Thu, 31 Oct 2013 10:12 am

Stevie_W wrote:For most phones that use VOIP, you make your connection to the phone as normal, and on top of that, you should be able to connect another network cable from your phone to your laptop.

All the VOIP phones i have used in the past have this capability, but i don't know if ALL VOIP phones can do this. It could save you having to buy a switch.

What make/model phone do you have?


](*,)

You are absolutely right of course. Thank you very much for saving an idiots money!

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Postby JR8 » Thu, 31 Oct 2013 10:24 am

Interesting follow-up there. I'd considered our domestic circuits as being entirely 'discreet', but yes I can see that what's beyond the main feed in, is shared.

It's a great product in a place like SG where they seem to provide as little cabling/connectivity/wall-plugs as possible. And what with most of us being transient here, we can't start installing permanent CAT5/6 network cabling around the place.

A 2-thumbs up concept. I hope whoever invented it is enjoying retirement lolling on some tropical beach :)

p.s. I first heard of the concept some years ago. Initially a product in the UK called Homeplug (IIRC), but I was fully cabled up back then so didn't need it. So having that in the back of my mind is what spurred action here this time. Do research online for articles including comparative tests of different brands, so you get what's appropriate for your needs. There's a lot of info out there...

Yes, X9 is correct in that we had to pair-up/synch our 3 units prior to initial use.


--- I remember the shop name now, Challenger, @ Funan


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