Singapore Expats Forum

Use Japanese electronics/appliances in Singapore

Discuss about computers & Internet. Including mobile phones, home appliances & other gadgets. Read about Windows security risks or virus updates.
Worldtravel
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon, 14 Oct 2013

Use Japanese electronics/appliances in Singapore

Postby Worldtravel » Mon, 14 Oct 2013 7:11 pm

Hey guys

I'm potentially relocating to Sing from Tokyo. I have a fair bit of electronics that I would take with since I've spent a fair bit of money on it.

Could anyone please let me know how to make sure they work in Sing please?

I have a 42 inch Sony LCD TV, a Denon AVR 1912 amplifier, and a blu ray player.

I've got a large subwoofer which I bought from the US...

Thank you!

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Mon, 14 Oct 2013 7:45 pm

As I recall JP systems work on 110v, whereas it's 240v here. Other things like 'PAL/SECAM system' compatibility are the same IIRC.

So looking at your list, your primary question is running all that 110v gear, off 240v mains. And the possibility/practicality of running it through a couple of big transformers.

You can find this info online. Google for things like 'voltage compatbility worldwide, step-up step-down transformers' ... and such like :)

User avatar
Tanuki
Regular
Regular
Posts: 149
Joined: Fri, 19 Jul 2013

Postby Tanuki » Mon, 14 Oct 2013 11:32 pm

The first place to check on any device is the specs that are listed on it. You may need an electron microscope to read the stuff, as they tend to use font sizes that humans can't see any more. Well, ok, that's maybe just me... :???:

Anyhow the device itself will have a note of what voltage range it can handle and whether it needs 50 or 60 Hz juice. Except for clocks, the 50 or 60 Hz power doesn't appear to create any issues, from what we've used (TV and audio equipment, rice cooker, microwave).

We bought some good voltage transformers from Amazon prior to moving here (we have Japanese and US electrical stuff). They're pretty easy to find in Japan also. If you wait til you're here, you can probably find some from expats who are leaving the country too.

User avatar
Strong Eagle
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 11059
Joined: Sat, 10 Jul 2004
Location: Off The Red Dot
Contact:

Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 15 Oct 2013 12:02 am

Japan is 100 volt, 50 hertz in east Japan, 60 hertz in the west.

As others have noted, your equipment must be variable voltage from 100 to 240 to work in Singapore. Typical examples would include laptop computers and new amplifiers and other electronics.

It is doubtful that your TV will work (at least to get standard cable signals). First, I don't think your Japanese TV receives anything but digital, and second, Japan uses a different digital system than Singapore.

However, there are some TV's (I own a Panasonic model) that, in addition to multiple voltages, also handle multiple signal input types. You should check your model.

User avatar
Tanuki
Regular
Regular
Posts: 149
Joined: Fri, 19 Jul 2013

Postby Tanuki » Tue, 15 Oct 2013 12:16 am

Strong Eagle wrote:
It is doubtful that your TV will work (at least to get standard cable signals). First, I don't think your Japanese TV receives anything but digital, and second, Japan uses a different digital system than Singapore.

True, but the only connection worth anything on TV's today is HDMI. Use that and you'll never have to be concerned with PAL/NTSC or any of that. It just turns the TV into a HD screen. however, the blue ray is a different story as that may not play the discs in SEA, which are not the same regional format as US or Japan. But you can usually play them on a computer and stream to an Apple TV or use HDMI to get around that. Woo Hoo!

BoroBoy
Regular
Regular
Posts: 96
Joined: Fri, 27 Mar 2009

Postby BoroBoy » Tue, 15 Oct 2013 12:27 am

I moved from sg to tokyo and things like tv, computer, playstation etc worked fine. Some adjusted automatically and others I had to flio a switch on the back from 240 to 110.
Things like hair dryers food processors, vacuum cleaner, iron did not work and I had to buy new.

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9314
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Postby x9200 » Tue, 15 Oct 2013 11:54 am

Tanuki wrote:
Strong Eagle wrote:
It is doubtful that your TV will work (at least to get standard cable signals). First, I don't think your Japanese TV receives anything but digital, and second, Japan uses a different digital system than Singapore.

True, but the only connection worth anything on TV's today is HDMI.

Ever heard about component + spdif, coax / toslink?

User avatar
Tanuki
Regular
Regular
Posts: 149
Joined: Fri, 19 Jul 2013

Postby Tanuki » Tue, 15 Oct 2013 11:57 am

x9200 wrote:Ever heard about component + spdif, coax / toslink?

That's an option I would only look at if the hardware didn't use HDMI. My Sony audio cabinet, for example, doesn't have it so I have spdif for the sound...

Worldtravel
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon, 14 Oct 2013

Postby Worldtravel » Wed, 16 Oct 2013 12:09 pm

Thanks for your input guys.

I've read somewhere that the wattage of the step down transformer also matters. How does it work? For example I intend to use a transformer for my subwoofer and my amplifier which I imagine have fairly high wattage.

User avatar
zzm9980
Governor
Governor
Posts: 6841
Joined: Wed, 06 Jul 2011
Location: Once more unto the breach

Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 16 Oct 2013 1:09 pm

Worldtravel wrote:Thanks for your input guys.

I've read somewhere that the wattage of the step down transformer also matters. How does it work? For example I intend to use a transformer for my subwoofer and my amplifier which I imagine have fairly high wattage.


Most of those don't work too well. You need to buy something fairly expensive to be reliable and not introduce electrical noise. At those costs, you might as well just replace your equipment.

I had a fairly cheap converter (~$40 USD) with only a cordless phone plugged into it; hardly high power. It still burnt out the phone after ~4 months.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Wed, 16 Oct 2013 1:13 pm

Worldtravel wrote:Thanks for your input guys.
I've read somewhere that the wattage of the step down transformer also matters. How does it work? For example I intend to use a transformer for my subwoofer and my amplifier which I imagine have fairly high wattage.


Check what wattage they are.

My hi-fi stack drew something like a max potential 3-400W (?/input), but you need to leave *lots* of buffer from the quoted figures... you'd need something like a 2-3kW trannie to run that, especially it's is high-end/performance gear. But no big deal, that was a standard spec even 15 years ago.

But don't think you're going to get a $10 travel plug/'trannie' and run a couple of hair-dryers through it, or a big hi-fi rig. A proper trannie is big, ugly, and very very heavy, but these days shouldn't be more than say S$75.


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Computer, Internet, Phone & Electronics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests