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Stolen wallet, lost Dependant Pass/FIN cards

Relocating, travelling or planning to make Singapore home? Discuss the criterias, passes or visa that is required.
Hannieroo
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Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 23 Oct 2013 11:50 pm

On the States you have to present your driver's license on demand, have it to drive and give your SS number when asked.

How do you replace a stolen card if you also lost your passport and your driving license? Will just a thumbprint do?

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JR8
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Postby JR8 » Thu, 24 Oct 2013 12:11 am

Why is it presumed people have driving licences? Why carry one, if not driving. It seems rather a blunt tool.

After all something like 70% of US Citizens don't have passports (I have been told. (Not a snarky euro-comment or anything, I quite understand)). So I think the insinuation that US citizens have and carry some form of proxy ID card, fails.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 24 Oct 2013 12:38 am

The US is still big on cheques to pay for things but most commercial businesses want to see some form of photo identification. Therefore the Driver's license or the ID card issued by the local Dept of Motor Vehicles upon request (and payment for) is deemed a valid ID. So, most who don't drive carry a card from the State's department of motor vehicles as that form of identification.

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Postby beppi » Thu, 24 Oct 2013 2:25 am

The USA is all messed up in this respect!
I once wanted to open a bank account there, because of frequent business trips to America. The bank wanted a driving license as ID. I had never driven in my life, so they gave me the hint that I can get a driving license with which I cannot drive from the DMV. The DMV said I need a social security number, which I (as a foreigner) didn"t have. They said I can get a social security number without social security from some other office. I eventually got that, just for the asking (and filling a form - I used the postal address of my Serviced Apartment), a non-driving-license and a bank account - without being resident or having anything more than a three-month visa-on-arrival.

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Postby Hannieroo » Thu, 24 Oct 2013 2:36 am

Your license number on the back of the cheque is your guarantee. I've never lived there in a place where not driving is an option though.

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Postby JR8 » Thu, 24 Oct 2013 9:53 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:The US is still big on cheques to pay for things but most commercial businesses want to see some form of photo identification.


I'm imagining you mean a photo id to write a cheque? I remember something like that on my first UK bank account. It was a bankcard with my name and signature on it, and it simply confirmed my name/signature, it had no other function (and didn't have a photo on, that technology didn't exist back then :))

I recall being surprised at the use and complexity of 'checks' in the US. Particularly like re: cashing cheques across a state border and so on. I expect there is some parallel in the EU of writing a euro cheque in France, and seeking to deposit it in Spain or similar (though I think the payer would do this by bank transfer in the EU)


sundaymorningstaple wrote:Therefore the Driver's license or the ID card issued by the local Dept of Motor Vehicles upon request (and payment for) is deemed a valid ID. So, most who don't drive carry a card from the State's department of motor vehicles as that form of identification.



This reminded me of something from the UK. What if the postman tries to deliver a 'registered' item of mail to you and you're out? Well it goes back to the Post Office and he drops you a card advising you where/when to collect it.

To collect it you need to prove your id. This is done in quite a clever way that caters for everyone. The delivery card has two lists of documents, A and B [I've looked but can't find these on the PO website*], and you need to bring one from each. A and B have about 6-8 options in each, including passport, driving license, bank statement, credit card statement, unemployment benefits card, utility bill, and so on. It's pretty comprehensive, but what it means is you don't need to have a passport or driving license, there will always be some combination the rightful recipient can provide as proof of id. I suppose the logic is each piece of id that is acceptable has required verified proof of id. So the PO check is based on 2* that.



* But here is an example of the same methodology from another organisation:
http://www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk/Pages/ ... roups.aspx

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:04 am

Hannie, New York & Washington DC both can be comfortably lived in without ever needing a driving license or a car. In fact, owning a car in NYC is more of a bother than not having on.


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