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Motorcycle Buying Process Question

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x9200
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Postby x9200 » Fri, 28 Feb 2014 9:29 am

The only thing I really don't like about my motorbike (which is Piaggio X9) is the sound the engine makes on acceleration. You know, typical for the sub 200 class, higher tone as compared to much softer and low tone for 300-400 and above. I would also prefer to have it manual. Otherwise, speed, acceleration, I have not really anything to complain about. And it's a very capacious bike. All what I manage to buy and carry with me will fit to it this or some other way. And it looks good. So I still think its rather subjective. Plus sometimes I am concerned whether I should upgrade for the safety reason. My riding style is very dynamic.

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Postby taxico » Sat, 01 Mar 2014 12:58 am

ST_Nepal wrote:One more curiosity, is it worth getting second hand class 2A bike, until I get class 2 licence then buy new one.

I like to ride super 4.


it really depends on your riding style and experience. and how heavy a bike can you handle? i laugh sometimes when i see a skinny short asian man struggling to balance a liter gsxr on his toes.

the super 4 is a great commuting bike in singapore and definitely not underpowered for local roads.

650cc is the magic number for my riding style if i wanted a daily rider. not too heavy for my knees and just enough juice for my type of downshift but not enough torque for things to get hairy (for me).

i would love to have a 1000cc sportbike but i don't think i can deal with using it on a daily basis.

but... i now ride a 500cc fuoco because i'm banned from riding anything with 2 wheels in singapore after a half-serious accident some years back.
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Postby x9200 » Sat, 01 Mar 2014 10:00 am

Is it really that significant factor? My X9 is close to 200kg (185kg IIRC) and it's 2b only. CBR650 is like 150-165kg. FJR1300 I am thinking of buying is ca 270kg.

The only time I've seen somebody having problems with more heavy bikes were for some petit ladies when a 2 class bike was on the ground (i mean flat on the ground). And the girls still managed to bring it up or they did not pass the final test.

What I found more significant is for example difference between scooters and regular bikes. They could be the same weight but they have very different center of mass and I need like half an hour to adjust to it.

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Postby ST_Nepal » Sat, 01 Mar 2014 1:06 pm

Hi,

I m undergoing class 2A lesson. So far

Lesson 1 : 1X
Lesson 2 : 2X
Lesson 3 : 2X (not pass yet)
1st time : 22 points
2nd time : 28 points

I am ok in riding on the road but not strictly sure about SG road traffic rules when it comes to circuit lesson at SSDC.

I get points on Blind spot, poor acceleration, change lane abruptly, unnecessary stopping etc. I feel down but I think it's hard for me becoz my 2B licence is converted.

I am going for 3attempt assessment on 6th March, hope I can pass this lesson.

Any encouragement or sharing pls..

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Postby ST_Nepal » Sat, 01 Mar 2014 1:09 pm

Thank you very much for all those information guys, really appreciate.

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Postby x9200 » Sat, 01 Mar 2014 1:15 pm

ST_Nepal wrote:I get points on Blind spot, poor acceleration, change lane abruptly, unnecessary stopping etc. I feel down but I think it's hard for me becoz my 2B licence is converted.

You think right. If you did 2B locally you would have no problems at all with 2A and 2. Unfortunately you have to learn what they want even if you think it is unreasonable. Get some extra runs outside the normal "curriculum". They are cheaper (at least used to be) and you can do on the circuit whatever you think would need further improvements.

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Postby taxico » Sat, 01 Mar 2014 1:51 pm

x9200 wrote:Is it really that significant factor? My X9 is close to 200kg (185kg IIRC) and it's 2b only. CBR650 is like 150-165kg. FJR1300 I am thinking of buying is ca 270kg...

What I found more significant is for example difference between scooters and regular bikes. They could be the same weight but they have very different center of mass and I need like half an hour to adjust to it.


you are right. i guess i meant more about good weigh distribution than just weight itself.

a heavier (but not overly heavy) bike inspires more confidence for some people (at least me) while others may prefer a lighter bike.

this may affect inexperienced riders and their handling know-how.

( the x9 was meant to be a 500 or 600cc maxi-scooter, so it's not a small/light bike even at 200cc.)
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Postby taxico » Sat, 01 Mar 2014 1:53 pm

ST_Nepal wrote:...I feel down but I think it's hard for me becoz my 2B licence is converted.

I am going for 3attempt assessment on 6th March, hope I can pass this lesson.

Any encouragement or sharing pls..


sorry, no words of encouragement possible. i converted to 2B, went for 1 lesson and ended up in a big verbal argument with 3 of the riding instructors over how stupid and lousy their curriculum was, threw the riding school booklet at their feet and never went back.

i then successfully converted from 2B to 2. local riding schools are extremely rigid.
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Postby ST_Nepal » Sun, 02 Mar 2014 1:05 pm

Yes, really appreciate for all your responses from all of you.

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Postby PNGMK » Sun, 02 Mar 2014 10:31 pm

taxico wrote:
ST_Nepal wrote:...I feel down but I think it's hard for me becoz my 2B licence is converted.

I am going for 3attempt assessment on 6th March, hope I can pass this lesson.

Any encouragement or sharing pls..


sorry, no words of encouragement possible. i converted to 2B, went for 1 lesson and ended up in a big verbal argument with 3 of the riding instructors over how stupid and lousy their curriculum was, threw the riding school booklet at their feet and never went back.

i then successfully converted from 2B to 2. local riding schools are extremely rigid.


+1. In my last job I had to do a defensive driving course in Ubi every two years. It drove me nuts being 'taught' to drive by the imbeciles they employ. The last one (sneakily) pulled on the hand brake on the skid pan.... I guess he was expecting me to spin out.... I corrected it, stomped the pedal through the floor and power slid out of it much to the hysterical amusement of the sinkes in the back seat. Sheepish instructor remembers "Aussies know how to drive lah". I can't imagine how it must be taught to ride a bike by them - but they must teach every rider to leave their legs dangling...

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Postby x9200 » Mon, 03 Mar 2014 7:38 am

It's not that bad but there are not any flexible. They have their curriculum and all it's micromanaged. It is mostly intended for local survival with something they consider the best practice. If one fails to adhere to all the points he will fail to pass to the next stage (and test of course). For example, emergency stopping on a wet road involves like 10 or so consecutive steps failing any of them to execute in right order = failure. At the same time I knew people at the last stages of the course who failed to understand some completely basic traffic regulations like always stopping in front of the stop sign.
Some of their practices I also consider unreasonable.

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Postby bgd » Mon, 03 Mar 2014 8:47 am

x9200 wrote:Is it really that significant factor? My X9 is close to 200kg (185kg IIRC) and it's 2b only. CBR650 is like 150-165kg. FJR1300 I am thinking of buying is ca 270kg.

The only time I've seen somebody having problems with more heavy bikes were for some petit ladies when a 2 class bike was on the ground (i mean flat on the ground). And the girls still managed to bring it up or they did not pass the final test.

What I found more significant is for example difference between scooters and regular bikes. They could be the same weight but they have very different center of mass and I need like half an hour to adjust to it.


Weight is really only a factor at low speeds, when you're trying to push the thing or worse, pick it up. Some bikes carry their weight low, e.g. the boxer BMWs and some high, Yamaha Tenere. At speed the weight disappears. If you are vertically challenged then some bikes will be handful at low speed, but experience helps.

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Postby x9200 » Mon, 03 Mar 2014 9:15 am

Partly related question: during a regular motorcycle course do they teach outside Singapore things like countersteering (I think this is the term)?

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Postby bgd » Mon, 03 Mar 2014 9:24 am

x9200 wrote:Partly related question: during a regular motorcycle course do they teach outside Singapore things like countersteering (I think this is the term)?


Do you mean in courses outside of Singapore?

I learned in the UK and the instructor tried to introduce countersteering on the very first day. It was too big a step for me until a day later when I was bearing down on a tree and needed to turn the bike - it worked. The instructor was used to training advanced riders and was just filling in, so in my experience yes but I don't know whether it's normal.

It may actually be covered more normally in advanced courses. I think the basic course is more about satisfying the test criteria.

I did a Direct Access course. Rode a 500cc bike over a 4 day course. On passing the test, if you are over 21, you can (legally not necessarily well) ride a bike of any cc.

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Postby taxico » Mon, 03 Mar 2014 9:57 am

x9200 wrote:Partly related question: during a regular motorcycle course do they teach outside Singapore things like countersteering (I think this is the term)?


i got my bike license in the US (MSF) and NZ. i remember the instructors talking about the concept of how the wheels behave before/during a turn (and the correct approach et al).

i'm not sure what is covered locally. sidecar bike style?
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