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Work overseas

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Mexikaner
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Work overseas

Postby Mexikaner » Tue, 20 Aug 2013 4:27 pm

Hello!
I'm not sure if my following question falls under 'general discussions'. But anyway, maybe the administrator can later on help me categorise this topic properly.

My question is: can a EP holder, legally supervise a project overseas?
Let me put it this way: when 'working' overseas supervising a project, is the EP holder regarded by authorities as a tourist, and hence unauthorized to perform any job related activities?

It may sound as a silly question to you, since the visa stamp you get on your passport usually says "employment PAID or UNPAID prohibited". However when supervising a project that's exactly what you're doing, am I right?

Thank you for your comments! Gracias!

M.

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the lynx
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Postby the lynx » Tue, 20 Aug 2013 4:32 pm

Will that supervising work be paid in Singapore or in the country you're supervising? And which country you're referring to (it wasn't clear if you're referring to the authorities from Singapore or the other country)?

Singapore doesn't care if you're out overseas to supervise a project, as long as you pay your income tax dues and as long as it is arranged by your company based in Singapore, and you get paid in Singapore for your supervising role.

Maybe others can chime in with better info.

Hope that helps.

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Mexikaner
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Postby Mexikaner » Tue, 20 Aug 2013 4:59 pm

Hi Lynx, thank you and yes, hired and paid by Singapore company, and by authorities I meant the country authorities in which the company's project is based.

Then again my concern is not really on taxes.

mainly I'd like to know what are the legal grounds that allow a working professional perform his job in a foreign country? is this person really only regarded as a tourist?

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ScoobyDoes
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Postby ScoobyDoes » Tue, 20 Aug 2013 5:20 pm

How long will you be overseas?

If it is only for a few days or a week then you can pass that by but if it's going to be several weeks or months you might need to look at a Work Permit in the country where the project is being done.......it greatly depends on which country we're talking about where, for example, India can be a PITA.
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Strong Eagle
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Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 20 Aug 2013 11:01 pm

A big question is: Which country? If it is Malaysia, you can probably do it without issue... I ran a project for more than a year, kept an apartment in KL, traveled almost weekly. I was asked once if I was working. I said, yes, I work for a Singapore company that has an office in KL that I must visit. End of conversation.

Thailand can be more difficult.

beppi
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Postby beppi » Tue, 20 Aug 2013 11:05 pm

A Singapore EP allows you to work in and only in Singapore. It has no implications on your status anywhere else.
Different countries have different rules about what constitutes "work" and what permits are required for it.
In most cases, doing any job for money (no matter where paid!) is considered work and needs a permit from that country's authorities.
In some countries, short stays for work are allowed without permit (e.g. Taiwan: two weeks), and some countries also allow "business" (the difference to "work" is small) for a certain time (e.g. Taiwan: 1 month).
For anything beyond that, you need a work permit of that country. It might be possible to do some work under the radar, but check beforehand what the chances and consequences (penalties) are, to both the employee and the company, of being found.


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