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Peculiar usage of words in Singaporean vocabulary

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abbym
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Post by abbym » Tue, 13 Aug 2013 10:33 pm

PNGMK wrote:
abbym wrote:Strangely, that is american I think? In the UK you start at ground, then go up to 1,2,3...etc. In north america the ground floor is level 1 if I remember correctly? Someone tell me if I'm wrong please! :)
I prefer (vastly) the European number line model

5
4
3
2
1
0
-1
-2

You know exactly where the 'datum' (ground level is). That's engineering in action.

YES! All numbering should start with 0

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Post by BedokAmerican » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 9:20 am

Here's another word often used here (that I think is also British/European):
Mum or Mummy instead of Mom or Mommy

Mums are a type of flower. A mummy is a wrapped up object made to look like a person, often seen as a part of scary Halloween decorations.

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Post by katbh » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 9:51 am

It is UK/AUS etc - rest of world again. We all write and say Mum not the mantra MOM.
But what I find strange is that at schools I am referred to as 'such and such's' Mummy. Not mother or parent. But Mummy

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Post by PNGMK » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 10:27 am

BedokAmerican wrote:Here's another word often used here (that I think is also British/European):
Mum or Mummy instead of Mom or Mommy

Mums are a type of flower. A mummy is a wrapped up object made to look like a person, often seen as a part of scary Halloween decorations.
Our adopted daughter calls her American mother (my wife) "mummy" - drives my wife wild. I taught her that.

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Post by Barnsley » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 2:22 pm

PNGMK wrote:
BedokAmerican wrote:Here's another word often used here (that I think is also British/European):
Mum or Mummy instead of Mom or Mommy

Mums are a type of flower. A mummy is a wrapped up object made to look like a person, often seen as a part of scary Halloween decorations.
Our adopted daughter calls her American mother (my wife) "mummy" - drives my wife wild. I taught her that.
Good Work
Life is short, paddle harder!!

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Post by Barnsley » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 2:24 pm

BedokAmerican wrote:Here's another word often used here (that I think is also British/European):
Mum or Mummy instead of Mom or Mommy

Mums are a type of flower. A mummy is a wrapped up object made to look like a person, often seen as a part of scary Halloween decorations.
As we are on a discussion on use of words and odd meanings.

Why do Americans say they "could care less" about something when the appear to mean they "couldn't care less" if you analyse the context they are using it.
Life is short, paddle harder!!

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Post by nakatago » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 2:42 pm

Barnsley wrote:
BedokAmerican wrote:Here's another word often used here (that I think is also British/European):
Mum or Mummy instead of Mom or Mommy

Mums are a type of flower. A mummy is a wrapped up object made to look like a person, often seen as a part of scary Halloween decorations.
As we are on a discussion on use of words and odd meanings.

Why do Americans say they "could care less" about something when the appear to mean they "couldn't care less" if you analyse the context they are using it.
Those Americans who could care less, don't know any better. I haven't heard a yank misuse it (yet). However, those who misuse it, probably misuse 'literally' as well, as in "I'm so hungry I could literally eat a cow" misuse.

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Post by BedokAmerican » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 2:51 pm

I agree that Americans don't always make sense. Every culture has its quirks.


For example: "ATM machine" (used worldwide).

"ATM machine" translated is "Automatic Teller Machine Machine."

Correct way: "ATM"


Another example:

"Enter your PIN number." (another worldwide phrase)

"PIN number" translated is "Personal Identification Number Number."

Correct way: "Enter your PIN."

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Post by abbym » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 3:00 pm

We just say ATM in the UK. Not sure about PIN - I think both ways are used, but yes, pin number doesn't really make sense! :)

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Post by Wd40 » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 3:14 pm

nakatago wrote:
Barnsley wrote:
BedokAmerican wrote:Here's another word often used here (that I think is also British/European):
Mum or Mummy instead of Mom or Mommy

Mums are a type of flower. A mummy is a wrapped up object made to look like a person, often seen as a part of scary Halloween decorations.
As we are on a discussion on use of words and odd meanings.

Why do Americans say they "could care less" about something when the appear to mean they "couldn't care less" if you analyse the context they are using it.
Those Americans who could care less, don't know any better. I haven't heard a yank misuse it (yet). However, those who misuse it, probably misuse 'literally' as well, as in "I'm so hungry I could literally eat a cow" misuse.
Just like "That ain't no good" Misuse :)

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Post by zzm9980 » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 4:25 pm

nakatago wrote:. However, those who misuse it, probably misuse 'literally' as well, as in "I'm so hungry I could literally eat a cow" misuse.
Ah, but literally has literally been misused so often, it's now considered acceptable usage according to Oxford.

On that note, here is what seems to be a true Singaporean peculiarity (and not just the difference between American and British English):

Irregardless

Yes, I hear it misused occasionally in most English speaking countries, but I almost never hear it used properly in Singapore. Drives me nuts. And yes, like literally, it's now considered acceptable to use it either way despite sounding so f*cking retarded.

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Post by the lynx » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 4:28 pm

repeat again
reconfirm
rewind back

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Post by kookaburrah » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 5:29 pm

"Erudite Singlish". E.g. (from random website)

"As Hong Bao rates is normally derive from the wedding banquet rates inorder for the newly wed to recover from their wedding cost, any increase or decrease in how much they pay for their wedding packages shall and will affect how much Hong Bao you need to pack."

It brings to mind Hyacinth Bucket in Keeping Up Appearances.

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Post by abbym » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 5:36 pm

I thought irregardless was an american thing? I have american friends who use it... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irregardless - not really that conclusive, but I don't think it is singaporean

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Post by Mi Amigo » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 6:01 pm

BedokAmerican wrote:Sorry if I've offended anyone. That wasn't my intent. I'm having some fun with this. I agree that the American way of speak isn't always the best way.
Absolutely no offence taken by me, and I can't imagine anyone else being offended either. I think this is a very interesting discussion.
BedokAmerican wrote:It's just that when you ask for the "toilet," you're implying you need to pull down your pants and "do your business." If you ask for the "restroom," you could be implying that you need to wash your hands, look in the mirror, maybe use the toilet, etc. Therefore, in my opinion, restroom is just a more general term and less invasive than "toilet" because people don't want to know exactly what you're going to do in the bathroom/restroom/toilet. But I'm pretty sure that 99% of the people who go to the restroom use the toilet.
As zzm said, I think it's a question of relative 'prudishness' (if such a word exists). In the UK there are many words for toilet, including (but not limited to): Bog, Kasi, Lavatory and Crapper (as in Thomas, without whose fine efforts we'd all probably still be digging holes in the ground). 'On the Throne' is another oft-used phrase from my childhood, but for the more genteel minded there were signs indicating the presence of 'Public Conveniences'.
BedokAmerican wrote:"Way out" vs "exit"
I used to love the sign at my local cinema in England above one of the 'exits' that read:

WAY OUT
LADIES

I was always optimistic about meeting some way out ladies, but generally disappointed with the outcome.
Barnsley wrote:
BedokAmerican wrote:Here's another word often used here (that I think is also British/European):
Mum or Mummy instead of Mom or Mommy

Mums are a type of flower. A mummy is a wrapped up object made to look like a person, often seen as a part of scary Halloween decorations.
As we are on a discussion on use of words and odd meanings.

Why do Americans say they "could care less" about something when the appear to mean they "couldn't care less" if you analyse the context they are using it.
I always thought this was a kind of unfinished sentence, as in, "I could care less, but it would be difficult."
kookaburrah wrote:"Erudite Singlish". E.g. (from random website)

"As Hong Bao rates is normally derive from the wedding banquet rates inorder for the newly wed to recover from their wedding cost, any increase or decrease in how much they pay for their wedding packages shall and will affect how much Hong Bao you need to pack."
Oh no. Please shoot me now.
Be careful what you wish for

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