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Peculiar usage of words in Singaporean vocabulary

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BedokAmerican
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Postby BedokAmerican » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 7:27 am

singapore eagle wrote:I think that BedokAmerican should be banned from posting on this thread until he takes some proper english classes :D

How about the use of the word 'one' at the end of a sentence? As in "He's very rich one".

Or, now I think about it 'one kind'. "Your brother one kind"


"English" is supposed to be capitalized, just like other languages. It's the grammatically correct way of writing.

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Postby zzm9980 » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 7:42 am

singapore eagle wrote:I think that BedokAmerican should be banned from posting on this thread until he takes some proper english classes :D


And what would those be? American English is no less "proper" than British English. It actually really makes me chuckle because I see Singaporeans snobbishly deriding American English more often than I see even Brits (the master snobs!) doing it.

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Postby singapore eagle » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 8:56 am

zzm9980 wrote:
singapore eagle wrote:I think that BedokAmerican should be banned from posting on this thread until he takes some proper english classes :D


And what would those be? American English is no less "proper" than British English. It actually really makes me chuckle because I see Singaporeans snobbishly deriding American English more often than I see even Brits (the master snobs!) doing it.


Please don't take me seriously. This is actually a really interesting discussion, because language and even grammar are things that constantly evolve. It's very difficult to know right from wrong (although many Singaporeans' inability to conjugate verbs properly is definitely wrong, in my opinion!).

I meant only to remark that an American's definition of 'peculiar' is vastly different from many other people's.

BedokAmerican wrote:"English" is supposed to be capitalized, just like other languages. It's the grammatically correct way of writing.


I knew I would get that sort of comeback!

Anyway, apologies everyone for any offence caused.
Last edited by singapore eagle on Fri, 16 Aug 2013 10:03 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby abbym » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 9:53 am

Hannieroo wrote:But in the US I did notice that UK programmes with regional accents were subtitled and brutish books were edited to useAmericanEnglish


I think they did this with The Northern Lights, by Philip Pullman. Renamed it The Golden Compass for north Americans. Not sure if the content changed but golden compass is certainly easier to read than alethiometer. I don't think it ever took off there anyway as housewives soon realised what the story was about and stopped reading it to their children...

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Postby PNGMK » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 9:55 am

singapore eagle wrote:One that I quite like is 'blur'.

"Why are you so blur today?". My wife probably asks me this every other day.


Yes that's a favourite of mine as well. I've made it my life mission to spread it to the west as well.

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Postby PNGMK » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 9:57 am

BedokAmerican wrote:
Hannieroo wrote:And this is merely an observation.

In the UK American documentaries are not subtitled and books written by American authors are not edited. So Brits figure out by context what a chip is or a Twinkie. But in the US I did notice that UK programmes with regional accents were subtitled and brutish books were edited to use American English. It surprised me but did explain why people looked at me crazy for saying knickers or petrol.


Oh yes, "chips" instead of "French fries" is one I forgot to mention. I've seen chips on menus and thought my sandwich would come with potato chips and French Fries showed up instead.

BTW, I think Twinkies are nasty.

Also, I had to look up petrol. Didn't know that was another word for gas.


Yes that ones drives me nuts. Ruth will say the car is "low on gas" and I'll ask her if the aircon is not working? (because that's the only part that uses a stored gaseous component to my knowledge). She'll get snarky and then say "it's low on gasoline" and I'll respond - "Oh - petrol!".

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Postby the lynx » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 10:05 am

PNGMK wrote:
BedokAmerican wrote:
Hannieroo wrote:And this is merely an observation.

In the UK American documentaries are not subtitled and books written by American authors are not edited. So Brits figure out by context what a chip is or a Twinkie. But in the US I did notice that UK programmes with regional accents were subtitled and brutish books were edited to use American English. It surprised me but did explain why people looked at me crazy for saying knickers or petrol.


Oh yes, "chips" instead of "French fries" is one I forgot to mention. I've seen chips on menus and thought my sandwich would come with potato chips and French Fries showed up instead.

BTW, I think Twinkies are nasty.

Also, I had to look up petrol. Didn't know that was another word for gas.


Yes that ones drives me nuts. Ruth will say the car is "low on gas" and I'll ask her if the aircon is not working? (because that's the only part that uses a stored gaseous component to my knowledge). She'll get snarky and then say "it's low on gasoline" and I'll respond - "Oh - petrol!".


This!

:lol: :lol: :lol:

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Postby zzm9980 » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 10:39 am

PNGMK wrote:
singapore eagle wrote:One that I quite like is 'blur'.

"Why are you so blur today?". My wife probably asks me this every other day.


Yes that's a favourite of mine as well. I've made it my life mission to spread it to the west as well.


I love it also!

I even explain 'blur like sotong' to anyone who will listen.

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Postby zzm9980 » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 10:41 am

singapore eagle wrote:Please don't take me seriously.
....
I meant only to remark that an American's definition of 'peculiar' is vastly different from many other people's.


Don't take me too seriously either. That last person who did (in a very similar discussion!) seemed to suffer some type of breakdown and stopped posting. He was one of the top posting members too :p

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Postby zzm9980 » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 10:43 am

BedokAmerican wrote:Also, I had to look up petrol. Didn't know that was another word for gas.


I'm pretty sure you're just trolling now. Come on you really never heard these terms in the US?

I think as long as I've been here, the only British-English words that threw me for a few seconds were 'prang' referring to a car accident) and 'digestives' (referring to graham crackers, and that was on this board).

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Postby PNGMK » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 11:04 am

zzm9980 wrote:
BedokAmerican wrote:Also, I had to look up petrol. Didn't know that was another word for gas.


I'm pretty sure you're just trolling now. Come on you really never heard these terms in the US?

I think as long as I've been here, the only British-English words that threw me for a few seconds were 'prang' referring to a car accident) and 'digestives' (referring to graham crackers, and that was on this board).


In PNG prang was slang for an accident as well, however I understood it had it's roots in aviation crashes.

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Postby Wd40 » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 11:09 am

zzm9980 wrote:
singapore eagle wrote:I think that BedokAmerican should be banned from posting on this thread until he takes some proper english classes :D


And what would those be? American English is no less "proper" than British English. It actually really makes me chuckle because I see Singaporeans snobbishly deriding American English more often than I see even Brits (the master snobs!) doing it.


Thats wierd. Indians love American English and they love British English as well, especially the accents.

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Postby singapore eagle » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 11:39 am

Posting on another thread a moment ago, I was reminded that Singaporean's 'take' meals.

"Have you taken breakfast yet?"

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Postby Barnsley » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 12:54 pm

singapore eagle wrote:Posting on another thread a moment ago, I was reminded that Singaporean's 'take' meals.

"Have you taken breakfast yet?"


Thats proper English ........

In cricket , both Lunch and Tea are taken :D
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Postby Barnsley » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 12:55 pm

zzm9980 wrote:
singapore eagle wrote:Please don't take me seriously.
....
I meant only to remark that an American's definition of 'peculiar' is vastly different from many other people's.


Don't take me too seriously either. That last person who did (in a very similar discussion!) seemed to suffer some type of breakdown and stopped posting. He was one of the top posting members too :p


I was gonna ask where they went ........ noticed they hadnt contributed in a while.
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