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Peculiar usage of words in Singaporean vocabulary

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PNGMK
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Post by PNGMK » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 5:25 pm

Wd40 wrote:
Hannieroo wrote:I lived near the Caucasus area and everyone there looks middle eastern.
How do middle eastern look? From what I know, there is no "one defining look". Most look like a cross between Indian, African and whites in varying proportions.
The nose is usually a dead give away.

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Post by Hannieroo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 5:29 pm

Lord, no. There's loads of sub races. Middle eastern is Caucasian but not white in a skin colour way.

Expat gets me. Expat hair. What is that? Expats aren't all white.

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Post by Wd40 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 5:54 pm

Its strange in Singapore, Expat is used for everyone who come in at high salary levels/Expat packages, live in condos etc and the rest are just called as FT.

In middle east everyone who is not a local is called an expatriate.

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Post by Mi Amigo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 7:18 pm

Hannieroo wrote:Expat gets me. Expat hair. What is that? Expats aren't all white.
Yeah, THIS ^^^^

Whenever I see 'Expat' written somewhere here (excluding this esteemed site of course), I just mentally substitute the word 'Ripoff'. E.g. real estate adverts that proclaim 'Expats' Choice' (well, they are more likely to misplace or leave out the apostrophe, but that's another discussion) - I take this to mean an agent who is focussing on ripping off newly arrived foreigners. Cynical? Moi??
Be careful what you wish for

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Post by Wd40 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 8:38 pm

Mi Amigo wrote:
Hannieroo wrote:Expat gets me. Expat hair. What is that? Expats aren't all white.
Yeah, THIS ^^^^

Whenever I see 'Expat' written somewhere here (excluding this esteemed site of course), I just mentally substitute the word 'Ripoff'. E.g. real estate adverts that proclaim 'Expats' Choice' (well, they are more likely to misplace or leave out the apostrophe, but that's another discussion) - I take this to mean an agent who is focussing on ripping off newly arrived foreigners. Cynical? Moi??
Lol. I sometimes see ads for motorcycle sales that highlight "expat owned", as if thats a positive point. Are expats more gentle with or better at taking care of bikes? :?

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Post by Hannieroo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 9:09 pm

It's just douchey.

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Post by BedokAmerican » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 10:31 pm

Here's another: "Prawns" instead of "shrimp"

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Post by Hannieroo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 10:38 pm

That's English English. A shrimp is a tiny thing used for potting or sandwiches. A prawn is the larger type. Technically they are different breeds.

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Post by Hannieroo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 10:44 pm

And this is merely an observation.

In the UK American documentaries are not subtitled and books written by American authors are not edited. So Brits figure out by context what a chip is or a Twinkie. But in the US I did notice that UK programmes with regional accents were subtitled and brutish books were edited to use American English. It surprised me but did explain why people looked at me crazy for saying knickers or petrol.

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Post by zzm9980 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 10:52 pm

Hannieroo wrote:And this is merely an observation.

In the UK American documentaries are not subtitled and books written by American authors are not edited. So Brits figure out by context what a chip is or a Twinkie. But in the US I did notice that UK programmes with regional accents were subtitled and brutish books were edited to use American English. It surprised me but did explain why people looked at me crazy for saying knickers or petrol.
Except for the Pikey accent in Snatch, I've never seen that. And I dare you to tell me that's not entirely reasonable to expect subtitles for that :P

Unless it was closed captioning for the entire show (Deaf people and all.)

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Post by singapore eagle » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 10:55 pm

I think that BedokAmerican should be banned from posting on this thread until he takes some proper english classes :D

How about the use of the word 'one' at the end of a sentence? As in "He's very rich one".

Or, now I think about it 'one kind'. "Your brother one kind"
Last edited by singapore eagle on Thu, 15 Aug 2013 11:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by singapore eagle » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 10:58 pm

One that I quite like is 'blur'.

"Why are you so blur today?". My wife probably asks me this every other day.

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Post by BedokAmerican » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 10:59 pm

Hannieroo wrote:And this is merely an observation.

In the UK American documentaries are not subtitled and books written by American authors are not edited. So Brits figure out by context what a chip is or a Twinkie. But in the US I did notice that UK programmes with regional accents were subtitled and brutish books were edited to use American English. It surprised me but did explain why people looked at me crazy for saying knickers or petrol.
Oh yes, "chips" instead of "French fries" is one I forgot to mention. I've seen chips on menus and thought my sandwich would come with potato chips and French Fries showed up instead.

BTW, I think Twinkies are nasty.

Also, I had to look up petrol. Didn't know that was another word for gas.

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Post by singapore eagle » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 11:09 pm

OK, one more. 'The ground'. You hear this all the time on the news.

"There's a lot of unhappiness on the ground"
"He's been walking the ground for the last two years"
"The ground is not so sweet this time"

I'll throw in 'grassroots' as another word that is peculiarly over-used here too.

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Fri, 16 Aug 2013 12:17 am

I've been walking the ground in a grassroots organization for the last 5 years. :cool:

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