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Peculiar usage of words in Singaporean vocabulary

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Hannieroo
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Postby Hannieroo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 2:08 pm

Biscuit is a french word not english.

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Postby Steve1960 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 2:18 pm

Hannieroo wrote:Biscuit is a french word not english.


Biscuit is an English word derived from a french word which was derived from a Latin phrase.

Blimey what a two and eight we are getting ourselves into here

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Postby BedokAmerican » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 2:21 pm

Here's another term I hear a lot here: "Caucasian" instead of "white."

In the U.S., usually the only time you see the word Caucasian is on official documentation. People speaking just say "white," even though that's not technically correct because white people are more peach-colored.

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Postby PNGMK » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 3:31 pm

BedokAmerican wrote:Here's another term I hear a lot here: "Caucasian" instead of "white."

In the U.S., usually the only time you see the word Caucasian is on official documentation. People speaking just say "white," even though that's not technically correct because white people are more peach-colored.


Yes... this one drives me nuts... for a start I don't think any of my ancestors are from the Caucas (isn't that near Russia?) and I've asked the ICA to record my race as "white" - they were appalled - "cannot! that's racist" - Hey hang on ass wipes - you're the racist racial profilers here! I think what they meant is "Cannot - that reminds us of our colonial days under the white overseer".

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Postby PNGMK » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 3:32 pm

Steve1960 wrote:
Hannieroo wrote:Biscuit is a french word not english.


Biscuit is an English word derived from a french word which was derived from a Latin phrase.

Blimey what a two and eight we are getting ourselves into here


Just try dealing with the word Scone and an American wife.

Me - I'll have some scones and jam for tea dear!

Her - You'll what?!

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Postby Fortan » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 3:45 pm

BedokAmerican wrote:I agree that Americans don't always make sense. Every culture has its quirks.


For example: "ATM machine" (used worldwide).

"ATM machine" translated is "Automatic Teller Machine Machine."

Correct way: "ATM"


Another example:

"Enter your PIN number." (another worldwide phrase)

"PIN number" translated is "Personal Identification Number Number."

Correct way: "Enter your PIN."


Just like 'narn bread'..... Narn means bread right?

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Postby the lynx » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 3:55 pm

Fortan wrote:
BedokAmerican wrote:I agree that Americans don't always make sense. Every culture has its quirks.


For example: "ATM machine" (used worldwide).

"ATM machine" translated is "Automatic Teller Machine Machine."

Correct way: "ATM"


Another example:

"Enter your PIN number." (another worldwide phrase)

"PIN number" translated is "Personal Identification Number Number."

Correct way: "Enter your PIN."


Just like 'narn bread'..... Narn means bread right?


Yep. Bread bread. :P
Partners in crime: Chapati bread and roti prata/prata bread

Same idea with rice paddy field = rice rice field

And pisang banana = banana banana

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Postby Steve1960 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 4:07 pm

PNGMK wrote:
Just try dealing with the word Scone and an American wife.

Me - I'll have some scones and jam for tea dear!

Her - You'll what?!


ooooh scones Devon clotted cream and jam I will have to add that to the things I miss thread :)

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Postby BedokAmerican » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 4:27 pm

abbym wrote:yes, biscuit is english. we use crackers for dry biscuits - like jacobs crackers - that you'd have with cheese.

Something I've seen here (and still don't understand) is a 1-for-1 promotion. I'm used to 2-for-1 (where you buy two items and pay for only one), but I really can't work out what a 1-for-1 deal could possibly be. Maybe 1 item costs only $1? Can anyone explain?


I don't understand this either. Does anyone know what the 1-for-1 or 1:1 means? Sounds almost as if they want you to think you're getting a good deal when you're really just paying the regular price.

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Postby BedokAmerican » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 4:27 pm

abbym wrote:yes, biscuit is english. we use crackers for dry biscuits - like jacobs crackers - that you'd have with cheese.

Something I've seen here (and still don't understand) is a 1-for-1 promotion. I'm used to 2-for-1 (where you buy two items and pay for only one), but I really can't work out what a 1-for-1 deal could possibly be. Maybe 1 item costs only $1? Can anyone explain?


I don't understand this either. Does anyone know what the 1-for-1 or 1:1 means? Sounds almost as if they want you to think you're getting a good deal when you're really just paying the regular price.

This is something I found online. Doesn't explain much.
http://1for1buffet.blogspot.sg

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 4:30 pm

Here one for one mean two for the price of one or half price. To the local, two for one would mean three. you buy one you get two more. one for one, buy one get one free. Simples. :P

If'n you been here three decades anyway! :oops:

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Postby Wd40 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 4:49 pm

I agree. The 1st time I heard the word Caucasian is here in Singapore. I never use it though, I refer to whites as whites.

Its interesting to read this wiki article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caucasian_race
Last edited by Wd40 on Thu, 15 Aug 2013 5:06 pm, edited 6 times in total.

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Postby abbym » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 4:51 pm

Aha, I understand now. Thank you!

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Postby Hannieroo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 5:10 pm

I lived near the Caucasus area and everyone there looks middle eastern.

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Postby Wd40 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 5:12 pm

Hannieroo wrote:I lived near the Caucasus area and everyone there looks middle eastern.


How do middle eastern look? From what I know, there is no "one defining look". Most look like a cross between Indian, African and whites in varying proportions.


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