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Peculiar usage of words in Singaporean vocabulary

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zzm9980
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Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 7:21 pm

abbym wrote:I thought irregardless was an american thing? I have american friends who use it... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irregardless - not really that conclusive, but I don't think it is singaporean


It's definitely used by everyone, I just hear it 10x more often in Singapore than anywhere else. Even the Indians in India I deal with don't use it, and they make written Singlish look like Shakespeare.

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Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 14 Aug 2013 8:04 pm

abbym wrote:We just say ATM in the UK. Not sure about PIN - I think both ways are used, but yes, pin number doesn't really make sense! :)


Cashpoint. My children say mummy but my eldest spells it mom because he learned it in the states. But my mil spells it that way because they do in the Black Country.

Must buy. Why? Because you put a label on it?

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Postby Barnsley » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 10:30 am

Hannieroo wrote:
abbym wrote:We just say ATM in the UK. Not sure about PIN - I think both ways are used, but yes, pin number doesn't really make sense! :)


Cashpoint. My children say mummy but my eldest spells it mom because he learned it in the states. But my mil spells it that way because they do in the Black Country.

Must buy. Why? Because you put a label on it?


I am a Cashpoint person as well ........ sadly I am now starting to say ATM for Cashpoint.

Losing my roots :(
Life is short, paddle harder!!

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Postby Hannieroo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 11:00 am

You big sellout.

Steve1960
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Postby Steve1960 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 11:56 am

There is only one English. The Queen's English.

Bring back the days of the Empire.

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Postby PNGMK » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 12:01 pm

Steve1960 wrote:There is only one English. The Queen's English.

Bring back the days of the Empire.


The one with very obvious germanic accent?

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Postby Steve1960 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 12:19 pm

I am just teasing :wink:

My Filipina wife already has me talking American English. Elevator, Stroller, diapers etc

Thankfully when I write I have not forgotten my 'U' yet. So I still have my sense of humour :-)

Damn the spell checker on this site is asking me to change it to 'humor'



:x

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Postby nakatago » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 12:21 pm

Steve1960 wrote:There is only one English. The Queen's English.

Bring back the days of the Empire.


Which queen dost thee suggest?

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Postby Steve1960 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 12:29 pm

nakatago wrote:
Which queen dost thee suggest?


Pearly Queen, proper English mate

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Postby Hannieroo » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 12:46 pm

Steve1960 wrote:There is only one English. The Queen's English.

Bring back the days of the Empire.


You should get that put on a t shirt. Maybe for next National day?

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Postby Steve1960 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 1:02 pm

Hannieroo wrote:[

You should get that put on a t shirt. Maybe for next National day?


That is about as good an idea as the one I had about bringing my wife's friend across to be our maid.

Runs in the family though. I recently had to persuade my brother not to wear his 'paddle faster I hear banjos' t-shirt on a visit to the southern US states..............

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Postby BedokAmerican » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 1:28 pm

Here's another: "biscuits" instead of "crackers" or "cookies."

I've always thought biscuits were a type of just-baked bread.

Let me guess: Biscuits are part of the queen's English.

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Postby abbym » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 1:57 pm

yes, biscuit is english. we use crackers for dry biscuits - like jacobs crackers - that you'd have with cheese.

Something I've seen here (and still don't understand) is a 1-for-1 promotion. I'm used to 2-for-1 (where you buy two items and pay for only one), but I really can't work out what a 1-for-1 deal could possibly be. Maybe 1 item costs only $1? Can anyone explain?

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Postby Steve1960 » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 1:57 pm

BedokAmerican wrote:Here's another: "biscuits" instead of "crackers" or "cookies."

I've always thought biscuits were a type of just-baked bread.

Let me guess: Biscuits are part of the queen's English.


Of course, you have a biscuit with Earl Grey tea :-)

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Postby abbym » Thu, 15 Aug 2013 1:58 pm

oh and we use cookies for baked biscuits which usually have chocolate chips in, are slightly chewy, or slightly larger than usual


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