Singapore Expats Forum

Residence status for child born in Singapore (PR/Foreigner)

Discuss about life in Singapore. Ask about cost of living, housing, travel, etiquette & lifestyle. Share experience & advice with Singaporeans & expat staying in Singapore.

Sponsored by:
Image
AE Logistics - Singapore Movers

lfo_24
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat, 15 Jun 2013
Location: Singapore

Residence status for child born in Singapore (PR/Foreigner)

Postby lfo_24 » Fri, 05 Jul 2013 12:58 pm

Hi, my wife is PR and I am a foreigner on employment pass.
Just out of curiosity, if we were to have our child in Singapore, what is his /her residence status? Is the child PR by default?

If not,
1. Can we apply PR for the child straight away?
OR
2. Can we apply only LTVP for the child?

Please advise.

User avatar
Wd40
Director
Director
Posts: 3936
Joined: Tue, 04 Dec 2012
Location: SIndiapore

Postby Wd40 » Fri, 05 Jul 2013 1:02 pm

I believe there is some short cut way to apply PR for your child if parents are PR(not sure if one parent or both parent).

But this short cut method is not published and you need to go to ICA to get the details and I believe there is time limit from the date of birth of the child from which you can avail this short cut method.

I got this information from my friend, he wanted to apply for PR for his child, but ICA asked him to visit atleast 2 times and kept giving him incorrect details and then he got pissed off and decided to apply for the LTSVP. After all his child was a "SON".

The default status of your child is foreigner and you can apply LTSVP.

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9320
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Postby x9200 » Fri, 05 Jul 2013 5:39 pm

We were both PRs when our son was born and it did not take any shortcuts. ICA suggested to apply for PR and LTVP for him at the same time as for the first one it might have taken longer to get it.
Right after birth the child is given like 45 days (IIRC) to solve out the paperwork at the relevant embassy, meaning to get the temporary passport.

Edited to add: I don't see anything like this on the ICA web page, only that the birth should be registered within 14 days so maybe I mixed something up about 45 days.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35168
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Fri, 05 Jul 2013 6:08 pm

x9200, you might be getting that mixed up with the protocol for the birth of a citizen born abroad for Singaporeans. Babies born to Singapore Citizens have up to 42 days to register the birth and have to provide reasons if not done so. Children born overseas to a Singaporean citizen have up to one year.

http://www.overseassingaporean.sg/stayi ... bassy-info

Child born overseas to Singapore citizens

If your child is born overseas, you can submit an application for Singapore citizenship for your child within the first year of birth.


Child born outside Singapore where at least one parent is a Singapore Citizen.
An overseas-born minor (child) may be eligible for Singapore Citizenship by Descent under Article 122(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of Singapore, if his/her parents meet any of the following conditions:

Male Singapore citizen by Birth who has a lawful marriage at time of minor's birth
Male Singapore citizen by Registration who has a lawful marriage at time of minor's birth and minor does not acquire citizenship of the country he was born by reason of his birth in that country
Female Singapore citizen by Birth and minor born on or after 15 May 2004
Female Singapore citizen by Registration and minor born on or after 15 May 2004. Minor shall not acquire citizenship of the country he was born by reason of his birth in that country
Male (who has a lawful marriage at time of minor's birth) or Female Singapore citizen by Descent has to declare their residence period in Singapore. The application can only be accepted if the parent fulfils the requirements stipulated in the Annex.
The application has to be submitted within one year of the child's birth. Otherwise, a letter of explanation and additional documents are required for the late submission.

All applicants for citizenship must be of good character, have satisfied the residential requirement and have the intention to reside permanently in Singapore. They must also be able to support themselves and their dependents financially.

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9320
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Postby x9200 » Fri, 05 Jul 2013 6:34 pm

Max 42 days is for any birth registration:
http://www.ica.gov.sg/page.aspx?pageid=144
(the section seems for citizens but the wording tells differently)


but for some reasons I thought the time window was a bit longer than 14 days. I think we did it over 5 days as the embassy issued the passport on spot and then ICA gave him 90 days (as per our country typical allowance), again IIRC.

User avatar
QRM
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1831
Joined: Mon, 17 Oct 2005
Location: Nassim hill

Re: Residence status for child born in Singapore (PR/Foreign

Postby QRM » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 9:28 am

lfo_24 wrote:Hi, my wife is PR and I am a foreigner on employment pass.
Just out of curiosity, if we were to have our child in Singapore, what is his /her residence status? Is the child PR by default?

If not,
1. Can we apply PR for the child straight away?
OR
2. Can we apply only LTVP for the child?

Please advise.


One thing is residence status but what about the more important issue of nationality?

My wife and I are both British citizens but discovered at the last minute if our child was born in Singapore she would not be automatically entitled to British citizenship, we had to have an emergency flight to the UK where the child was born to ensure she maintained her british citizenship.

User avatar
Wd40
Director
Director
Posts: 3936
Joined: Tue, 04 Dec 2012
Location: SIndiapore

Re: Residence status for child born in Singapore (PR/Foreign

Postby Wd40 » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 10:02 am

QRM wrote:
lfo_24 wrote:Hi, my wife is PR and I am a foreigner on employment pass.
Just out of curiosity, if we were to have our child in Singapore, what is his /her residence status? Is the child PR by default?

If not,
1. Can we apply PR for the child straight away?
OR
2. Can we apply only LTVP for the child?

Please advise.


One thing is residence status but what about the more important issue of nationality?

My wife and I are both British citizens but discovered at the last minute if our child was born in Singapore she would not be automatically entitled to British citizenship, we had to have an emergency flight to the UK where the child was born to ensure she maintained her british citizenship.


But why did you have to fly to Britain? All you need is your passports and your child's birth cert, if she is born in SG and just go to your Embassy to get her passport on the spot,like x9200 said.

For sure, your child cannot get SG citizenship so British embassy has to help her to get her citizen, no?

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35168
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Re: Residence status for child born in Singapore (PR/Foreign

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 12:29 pm

QRM wrote:
lfo_24 wrote:Hi, my wife is PR and I am a foreigner on employment pass.
Just out of curiosity, if we were to have our child in Singapore, what is his /her residence status? Is the child PR by default?

If not,
1. Can we apply PR for the child straight away?
OR
2. Can we apply only LTVP for the child?

Please advise.


One thing is residence status but what about the more important issue of nationality?

My wife and I are both British citizens but discovered at the last minute if our child was born in Singapore she would not be automatically entitled to British citizenship, we had to have an emergency flight to the UK where the child was born to ensure she maintained her british citizenship.


Maybe that is something with the UK? As an American, all I had to do was register her birth using the Singapore issued Birth Certificate and they were automatically given Citizenship with only one parent being a US citizen.

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9320
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Re: Residence status for child born in Singapore (PR/Foreign

Postby x9200 » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 1:00 pm

Wd40 wrote:
QRM wrote:One thing is residence status but what about the more important issue of nationality?

My wife and I are both British citizens but discovered at the last minute if our child was born in Singapore she would not be automatically entitled to British citizenship, we had to have an emergency flight to the UK where the child was born to ensure she maintained her british citizenship.


But why did you have to fly to Britain? All you need is your passports and your child's birth cert, if she is born in SG and just go to your Embassy to get her passport on the spot,like x9200 said.

For sure, your child cannot get SG citizenship so British embassy has to help her to get her citizen, no?

For my country children born to its citizens acquire the citizenship at birth so it is automatic and requires no action. It looks like British decided to make it much more complicated:
http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/briti ... noverseas/

beppi
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1752
Joined: Thu, 07 Sep 2006
Location: Ahlongistan (O$P$)

Re: Residence status for child born in Singapore (PR/Foreign

Postby beppi » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 3:42 pm

Wd40 wrote:For sure, your child cannot get SG citizenship so British embassy has to help her to get her citizen, no?

Unfortunately, international law (or, rather, the patchwork of uncoordinated national laws) is not as easy as that. No country is obliged to help somebody who is denied something by another country - it is entirely up to the parents to ensure the kid has some citizenship, and there are real possibilities to end up stateless through error, inaction or even coincidence.
E.g., a baby of USA citizens can only inherit their citizenship if the parents have lived a certain number of years in the USA. If they do not fulfill this criteria, and give birth in a country which does not give citizenship to people born there, the baby is not eligible for any citizenship.
I knew some stateless people (who became so for political reasons) and can tell you that, despite passport-like UN papers for stateless refugees, they encountered real hazzles at every corner of their lives. It is to be avoided at all cost!

User avatar
Wd40
Director
Director
Posts: 3936
Joined: Tue, 04 Dec 2012
Location: SIndiapore

Postby Wd40 » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 4:13 pm

Thats interesting! and both USA and UK will happily offer citizenships to foreigners born in their country. How ironic!

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35168
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 4:20 pm

From Wiki....

The modern sense of citizenship is usually based on one or more of these factors:

Parents are citizens. If a person has one or both parents[citation needed] who are citizens of a given state, then the person is normally a citizen of that state as well. Citizenship granted in this fashion is referred to by the Latin phrase jus sanguinis meaning "right of blood" and means that citizenship is granted based on ancestry or ethnicity, and is related to the concept of a nation state common in Europe. A person could be born outside of the physical territory of a country, but if his or her parents are citizens, then the child is a citizen as well. States normally limit the right to citizenship by descent to a certain number of generations born outside the state. This form of citizenship is common in civil law countries
.
Born within a country. Many people are presumed to be citizens of a state if they were born within its territory. Citizenship granted in this fashion is referred to by the Latin phrase jus soli meaning "right of soil". This form of citizenship is common in common law countries and originated in England where those who were born within the realm were subjects of the king.

Marriage to a citizen. Citizenship can also be obtained by marrying a citizen, which is termed jure matrimonii.

Naturalization. States normally grant citizenship to people who have immigrated to that state and have resided there for the given number of years. Sometimes aspiring citizens may have to pass a test, swear allegiance to their new state and renounce their prior citizenship.

User avatar
Mi Amigo
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1791
Joined: Sat, 19 Jun 2004
Location: Kinto Pino

Postby Mi Amigo » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 5:33 pm

Wd40 wrote:Thats interesting! and both USA and UK will happily offer citizenships to foreigners born in their country. How ironic!

UK citizenship based solely on having been born there is no longer automatically available. Not sure whether or not it's still available in the USA.
Be careful what you wish for

User avatar
QRM
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1831
Joined: Mon, 17 Oct 2005
Location: Nassim hill

Re: Residence status for child born in Singapore (PR/Foreign

Postby QRM » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 8:50 pm

Wd40 wrote:
QRM wrote:
lfo_24 wrote:Hi, my wife is PR and I am a foreigner on employment pass.
Just out of curiosity, if we were to have our child in Singapore, what is his /her residence status? Is the child PR by default?

If not,
1. Can we apply PR for the child straight away?
OR
2. Can we apply only LTVP for the child?

Please advise.


One thing is residence status but what about the more important issue of nationality?

My wife and I are both British citizens but discovered at the last minute if our child was born in Singapore she would not be automatically entitled to British citizenship, we had to have an emergency flight to the UK where the child was born to ensure she maintained her british citizenship.


But why did you have to fly to Britain? All you need is your passports and your child's birth cert, if she is born in SG and just go to your Embassy to get her passport on the spot,like x9200 said.

For sure, your child cannot get SG citizenship so British embassy has to help her to get her citizen, no?


Which is exactly what I thought and so did my brother who had his baby in Hong Kong 2 months before ours was due he turned up at the British embassy to register his newborn only to have the bombshell dropped on him, they are not entitled to British citizenship, he called me and I doubled checked with the embassy here and it was true. Which explains our sudden sprint back to the uk when my wife was seven and a half months pregnant.

The small print is that my brother , myself and both our wives were not born in the uk. Our British parents were posted overseas. The only exception to the rule was if your parents worked in the armed forces or the crown.

User avatar
Wd40
Director
Director
Posts: 3936
Joined: Tue, 04 Dec 2012
Location: SIndiapore

Postby Wd40 » Sat, 06 Jul 2013 10:10 pm

Mi Amigo wrote:
Wd40 wrote:Thats interesting! and both USA and UK will happily offer citizenships to foreigners born in their country. How ironic!

UK citizenship based solely on having been born there is no longer automatically available. Not sure whether or not it's still available in the USA.


Yeah! I just read about British Citizenship. If you are born in the UK and one of your parents is a Citizen or you are legal settled in UK, then you get British Citizenship, which is not bad.

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/briti ... territory/

In case of US, I know a case of an Indian working in IT, who very recently was sent to the US onsite for a short term 2 years project. In the mean while his wife became pregnant and he made use of the opportunity and made sure his wife goes to the US to deliver the child to get US citizenship.

Now project is over and all 3 are back in India and the baby is a US citizen. Talk about Indians abusing PR :P


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Staying, Living in Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest