Singapore Expats Forum

Enough with the begging already

Discuss about life in Singapore. Ask about cost of living, housing, travel, etiquette & lifestyle. Share experience & advice with Singaporeans & expat staying in Singapore.

Sponsored by:
Image
AE Logistics - Singapore Movers

User avatar
zzm9980
Governor
Governor
Posts: 6842
Joined: Wed, 06 Jul 2011
Location: Once more unto the breach

Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 2:59 pm

Hannieroo wrote:I've had none here. At all.


Go to a heartland central market (Toa Payoh Central, AMK Central, Bedok Central, MP, etc) on a Sunday. Especially outside banks and NTUC.

User avatar
zzm9980
Governor
Governor
Posts: 6842
Joined: Wed, 06 Jul 2011
Location: Once more unto the breach

Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 3:02 pm

JR8 wrote:Here's an entry level candidate...


I was just going to ask if that was Sara Jessica Parker, but the URL confirmed it. Wow someone beat her with an ugly stick (axe?). Poor Ferris Bueller.

katbh
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 599
Joined: Thu, 04 Oct 2007
Location: Singapore

Postby katbh » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 7:04 pm

Just to get it straight. Charity collection is permissible for school children to do. They do it largely because they get their CIP hours/points which they have to have each your or they will not be able to get a good O Level score. These points are for charity and community work. You can help at SPCA, old peoples homes, orphanages, charity collection etc. They are all officially organised and the children do not get any financial reward. This is very similar to charities in our home countries such as poppy day in UK, Legacy day in Australia etc. These charities really rely on this to get their work done, and they do not pay the children. In Singapore, secondary students need to do a certain amount of CIP hours to allow their O level score to be reduced by a point or so (the lower the score the better).

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35159
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 7:52 pm

So they are getting paid, but not in currency that is spendable, per se. :wink:

Or, to put it differently, it's not charity for them, they are earning something (usable on this earth as opposed to some mythical place in the clouds after they leave this place) :-|

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 8:00 pm

Quite: So they are being indirectly personally rewarded for ostensible '''charity''' (i.e. selfless) work?

Hello Singapore.

kookaburrah
Regular
Regular
Posts: 141
Joined: Thu, 21 Aug 2008
Location: SG

Postby kookaburrah » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 8:53 pm

Thank you! I am glad someone sees the point I am trying to make.

Ecureilx, I have clearly touched a particularly raw nerve and for that I apologise. My rant was toward the practice, not you.

You seem to be doing the same as the collectors - confusing money-collection-for-points with charity. I am not mother Theresa, and I never would purport to be, but this is not charity, but simple money collection. Again, I reiterate I do NOT think I am being scammed. I am sure the money is spent in government approved ways by the organisations in question. Just call a spade a spade, and maybe come out themselves and meet the populace. We like to know about these things - from people who care and actually DO. Send the children home and get them to spend some time with their grandparents - more useful, from a humanist perspective.

On another note, it hasn't escaped my attention that only the sexy charities get the masses to lift a pinky finger here. Just watch and see how ex-convicts, former drug users, or even AIDS charities get treated around here. Now THOSE I help. The children, you're damn right I don't.

Hannieroo
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 996
Joined: Tue, 22 Jan 2013

Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 8:59 pm

I.B and Duke of Edinburgh both require some sort of voluntary service. It's not a Sing Thing.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 9:05 pm

I get hung up upon this as a purist (and I apologise for my apparent puritan stance.

Giving means giving

Giving means getting no reward... er.. that's why it's *giving*, you are left in an unresolved debt. That IS the point.

Oh... I give up .... [sigh]

Hannieroo
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 996
Joined: Tue, 22 Jan 2013

Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 9:58 pm

I didn't say it wasn't a bit off. Enforced good.

But years of working for charities had taught me that nobody does it for nothing. To feel good, less guilt, boasting rights, whatever. There is always a pay off.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 10:17 pm

Yep, and that's why a simple act of charity

- not requiring you to build a house

- or rescue a village

- or what ever...

is so rare these days.

These days most people demand 'return', .... for their 'charity'...



Isn't it all so contrary.... bwahahaha....

morenangpinay
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 890
Joined: Mon, 02 Mar 2009

Postby morenangpinay » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 10:32 pm

Are they allowed to collect in another way? Like a fundraising activity atleast they also Learn some fundraising and organizing skills.it seems their approach is not very popular

Hannieroo
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 996
Joined: Tue, 22 Jan 2013

Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 10:33 pm

I don't agree. I think most people are basically good.

Maybe skewed because most of the people I know are either in caring professions or volunteer huge chunks of their time to causes they believe in. The last charity I worked for was goal based, not financially, but we all had a task that varied by difficulty and time commitment, when you completed it you actually got high. You could feel the euphoria. For some people that could get dangerous. But a payoff all the same.

That's a point, you never see a charity bag pack here. Swiss School had a car wash but that's the only one i've seen.

morenangpinay
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 890
Joined: Mon, 02 Mar 2009

Postby morenangpinay » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 10:38 pm

That's what my philosophy prof said .there are no unselfish acts. We do good acts because we feel good .

Hannieroo
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 996
Joined: Tue, 22 Jan 2013

Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 10:55 pm

Which is fine. Gets the job done, everybody is happy.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Thu, 13 Jun 2013 10:18 am

Hannieroo wrote:Which is fine. Gets the job done, everybody is happy.


Hence you could argue that charities are a facilitating mechanism allowing people to feel good about themselves :)

p.s. I've been in at both the front and back-ends.
- Working for a nil-profit all-volunteer charity for two years, incl digging wells/drains in Amazon villages, and so on...
-Working on Wall Street and being forced to donate part of my salary to charity via 'United Way', so the Bank could get a huge annual headline about how '''generous''' it's employees were...

(I've mentioned it before, but it's maybe worth airing again. In Confucionist societies people who receive charity (say monks on the daily alms rounds, or street-beggars) do not thank or even acknowledge a donor. The first few times I witnessed this I have to say I was puzzled (if not even a little put-out).

It is because to thank/acknowledge you would be the 'repay' (or settle) the debt, and it is considered more humble, or honest, [or? hunting the right word here] to remain in debt to the donor. The donor doesn't get thanked > they don't get to 'feel good about themselves', BUT as that is not why they gave, they don't want to be thanked. They wanted to 'give of themselves').


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Staying, Living in Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests