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Brah
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Postby Brah » Tue, 11 Jun 2013 8:45 pm

Hannieroo wrote:Truth. A hatchet face and a buzz cut on a 5'10", 195lb woman is usually deterrent enough.

I thought the term was 'axe face'. At least that's what I learned from this forum.....

Back to the subject.

I usually both avoid these dopey-faced know-nothings and then feel bad for doing so.

They were everywhere this past weekend. This past weekend I was approached by a gaggle of three.

I was asked if I wanted to donate. I asked what it was for*. The one asking could barely form a sentence, and no it wasn't because I was intimidating her. When that non-answer wasn't sufficient I suggested that if you're going to ask strangers for money on the street, then you need to clearly explain what it is for*.

When she again failed at that, the more articulate of the bunch stepped up and gave a reasonable explanation. I told her "good work", turned to the inarticulate one and said "..and that is what you need to do...", put money in the tin and walked away without chance for further comment.


*Or if I was speaking the local dialect, "...you need to explain what is it for..." - which I hope sounds horrid to those reading this.

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Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 7:54 am

Brah wrote:*Or if I was speaking the local dialect, "...you need to explain what is it for..." - which I hope sounds horrid to those reading this.


I don't think thats local enough.Don't use explain. Try "can tell". Maybe "You can tell what is it for?" See, nothing longer than one syllable.

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Postby Brah » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 7:57 am

That works too.

I guess I just heard statements phrased as questions one too many times yesterday and was on a bit of a rant....

"...I don't know what is it for...."

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JR8
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Postby JR8 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 9:29 am

"Tell or not ah?"

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Postby martincymru » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 9:41 am

Wider issue .......
Put simply Orchard Road is a mess; an assault course for want of a better description.

The good old days when a walkway was that, simply a walkway.

LTA or whoever controls the walkways in Singapore need to get tough; illegal encroachment out of control and many dubious characters.

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Postby the lynx » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 9:43 am

Brah wrote:
Hannieroo wrote:Truth. A hatchet face and a buzz cut on a 5'10", 195lb woman is usually deterrent enough.

I thought the term was 'axe face'. At least that's what I learned from this forum.....


Sorry, don't mean to be rude but I personally don't know what a hatchet/axe face looks like so I googled it.

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/hatchet+face

Hatchet Face

The characteristic physiognomy of advanced myotonic dystrophy; the face is drawn and lugubrious, with hollowing of the muscles around the temples and jaws; eyes are ‘hooded’, lower lip droops, and global weakness of facial muscles causes sagging of lower face, accompanied by marked wasting of the neck muscles, especially the flexors, which imparts a ‘swan-neck’ appearance. The hatchet face may also be seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and in Curschmann-Batten-Steiner syndrome


:-| Is this the one JR8 and the others were talking about?

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 10:09 am

the lynx wrote: :-| Is this the one JR8 and the others were talking about?


No it's not a medical condition (!), it's a slang term for a woman with a big nose, eyes close together = the overall scheme rather resembling an axe/hatchet.


Here's an entry level candidate...
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Postby ecureilx » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 10:43 am

kookaburrah wrote:That's where I see a problem - the "many a charity" issue. There are indeed many. Countless, for a country the size of a handkerchief. This is the fifth different country I live in, and never have I been accosted by these many children asking me to contribute towards every conceivable cause under the sun. I agree that charities need funds to run their operations - but this, in my opinion, is the lazy way to do it.


Ah .. I see ... how else do the Charities raise funds ? Post-NKF Saga, Singapore tightened the fund raising guidelines, so you cannot do mega fund raisers etc. and burn 90cents to make 1$, and the children's collecting funds add to their CIP hours, something that's needed for their own good-scores too. So what is wrong again ? If you are not happy donating, DON'T DO IT .. nobody is holding a knife to your neck and demanding that you donate ...

I am sure they all have their permits and that their need is legitimate. What I feel is that this need is completely secondary to the exercise - children ask as they are told to with vague instructions beyond the "smile, look cute and say how nice we are being to old people/little orphans/whatever". This leads to the impression, seemingly prevalent around here, that dealing with old people/little orphans/whatever is exclusively the responsibility of said charity with no need for further engagement by the general population beyond these flag days.


Having done enough briefing for Students, no sir, you are wrong .. kids are not told to Smile and ask $ - they are given a brief of what the organisation is, and expected to answer, and if they don't answer, I wouldn't punish them or go in that direction, because, VWOs value the time the students spend

Arsenal_fan wrote:Well the children are ok, they can take no for an answer. I've had some really persistent volunteers from the heart foundation. They look far too professional to be volunteers. I guess they work on a commission basis.


That's a new Trend, and it is a matter of time before NCSS puts a stop to this practice of engaging professional fund raising organisation, if they were violating any law.

They really insisted on a large donation and even had a installment plan to donate (100$ monthly can?). Totally amazed at the idea, if you don't have the money to donate today will you be able to afford it tomorrow?


you are kidding right ? why not complain to NCSS ?? if you were asked to donate such large sums ? Go ahead and complain ..

Another incident around a year and a half ago, we had one of these good Samaritan turn up at our doorstep at 10 p.m. when i told him i donate to other causes and would not be able to help him, he got all angry and started yelling in mandarin.


Are you sure that was a legal fund raising exercise ? Legal fund raising exercises cannot go beyond 7PM .. so you should have called the cops .. they will turn up

I sometimes wonder how much of what you donate really goes towards the cause.


Go do some reading .. if you think money is being scammed, by the many welfare organisations and somebody is squandering the money, I have one little advice: Leave Singapore .. years ago, when the NKF Saga happened, the Government has enforced more transparency and accounting for any organisation that conducts public donation

If in doubt, stop accusing, go read up at NCSS at www.ncss.org.sg

And as per the latest updates, each fund raising approval form has a QR Code reader, directing you to the NCSS site and describing the progam, and also an Interactive SMS system to seek clarification.

BTW, FYI:

http://www.spf.gov.sg/licence/frameset_HH.html
[b]
All fundraising appeals are governed by the Charities (Fund-raising Appeals for Local and Foreign Charitable Purposes) Regulations and the Charities (Institutions of a Public Character (IPC)) Regulations. The Regulations cover areas such as duty to donors (e.g. what fundraisers should disclose), how donations are to be used, the need to maintain accounting records, efficiency in fundraising and requirements for commercial fundraisers.

Those who are keen to conduct house-to-house and/or street collections could either apply for a permit from the Singapore Police Force or seek an approval from the National Council of Social Service (NCSS) to do so if they are NCSS members. A Fund-Raising Permit for Foreign Charitable Causes from the office of the Commissioner of Charities is required for any fundraising appeal with overseas beneficiaries.

For details, please refer to the Charity Portal. The Charity Portal is a resource centre for both charities and the public, and contains comprehensive information on the rules and regulations governing charities. The two Regulations pertaining to fundraising can be found in the “Charity Essentialsâ€Â

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Sergei82
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Postby Sergei82 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 11:13 am

I plug in my earphones and just pass by without reacting. If they wave their hands and try to stop me, I smile and show them middle finger - I dun wanna hear what they want. Always works.

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Postby Strong Eagle » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 11:14 am

That looks a helluva lot like Michelle Bachmann.


JR8 wrote:
the lynx wrote: :-| Is this the one JR8 and the others were talking about?


No it's not a medical condition (!), it's a slang term for a woman with a big nose, eyes close together = the overall scheme rather resembling an axe/hatchet.


Here's an entry level candidate...
Image


Image

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Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 11:19 am

Somebody overdid the Botox.


For me it means a hard and not overly friendly face. SJP is more of a horse face. Eat something woman. :mad:

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 11:35 am

I associate it with Central European Jewish immigrants into East Coast US, esp NYC and the likes.

Or put another way, that was where I was living when I first observed this 'type' of features/look.


p.s. The other observation is that in Asia the features tend to be much softer; so when you return to the west, everyone looks very big and sort of 'pointy' in comparison - the axe/hatchet-faced look being at one extreme.

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Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 11:58 am

Well, it keeps people out of my face so I welcome it. Buying xxxl not so much.

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 1:35 pm

'Opinion polls suggest high levels of public hostility towards street fundraisers, with as many as 80 per cent of those interviewed being against them.[7] Under present UK law, street fundraising is legal as street fundraisers are not themselves soliciting cash donations, but rather Direct Debit agreements.'
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_fundraising
(The above refers to 'Charity Muggers/Chuggers' rather than in a more general sense. My bold above too)

A-ha! That will be the loophole via which these people are able to continue to operate. (So you just tell them 'I'd be happy happy to make a cash donation, but I don't have a bank account'. So you show wiling, but they cannot legally accept? hehehe... ).

I'd been pondering that, as technically it's illegal for any charity collector on a UK street (Salvation Army, Red Cross... and so on) to shake a collecting tin of coins, as the sound of the shaking coins is considered soliciting for cash.

I wonder if this law (and it being ignored) follows in SGn law...
Last edited by JR8 on Wed, 12 Jun 2013 6:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby ecureilx » Wed, 12 Jun 2013 1:48 pm

JR8 wrote:A-ha! That will be the loophole via which these people are able to continue to operate. (So you just tell them 'I'd be happy happy to make a cash donation, but you don't have a bank account'. So you show wiling, but they cannot legally accept? hehehe... ).


In Singapore, you are not allowed to insist on a minimum amount for donation, as per NCSS rules for fund raising.
JR8 wrote:I'd been pondering that, as technically it's illegal for any charity collector on a UK street (Salvation Army, Red Cross... and so on) to shake a collecting tin of coins, as the sound of the shaking coins is considered soliciting for cash.

I wonder if this law (and it being ignored) follows in SGn law...


in Singapore, as I wrote earlier, you need to get a permit, for weekday donation collection, and win a ballot for weekend donation collection, and the approval will state the terms and conditions, areas you can collect etc. etc.

Of course, I would like to add, of late, a lot of Asean people are turning up here, and collecting donation for this or that charity, and these are illegal. and these fair number tell you that they want minimum x $ for this or that charity .. and once I asked the person collecting if the donation is for her own benefit or actually for the charity, considering she would have to spend for flight ticket, accomodation and food etc. .

And your donating to them is also illegal, if I read the law and NCSS guidelines correctly.

Such donation collection should be in private, not in public places- private - i.e. churches, private gatherings etc.

I am still trying to figure out what ticked kookaburrah off .. maybe is a magnet for such 'illegal' fund raisers ??


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