Moving household items question

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cecilyb
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Moving household items question

Post by cecilyb » Fri, 17 May 2013 12:09 pm

We may be taking an assignment in Singapore for 3+ years coming from the US. What should we do about bringing things over like the vacuum, Kitchenaid mixer, etc., basically all the nice kitchen appliances that we use? What about the computer (it's an Apple)? Is it an option to have the plug changed out so that we don't have to buy new ones?

What about moving the furniture over, specifically some of the upholstered pieces like the couch and headboard? Will it do okay in such a humid environment?
ETA: the company will be paying for moving costs
Last edited by cecilyb on Fri, 17 May 2013 12:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Sergei82
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Post by Sergei82 » Fri, 17 May 2013 12:45 pm

Cheaper to buy here than to move it. Moreover, there is likelihood that your electronic appliances will not work here.

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Re: Moving household items question

Post by BedokAmerican » Fri, 17 May 2013 1:34 pm

cecilyb wrote:We may be taking an assignment in Singapore for 3+ years coming from the US. What should we do about bringing things over like the vacuum, Kitchenaid mixer, etc., basically all the nice kitchen appliances that we use? What about the computer (it's an Apple)? Is it an option to have the plug changed out so that we don't have to buy new ones?

What about moving the furniture over, specifically some of the upholstered pieces like the couch and headboard? Will it do okay in such a humid environment?
ETA: the company will be paying for moving costs
The only "appliances" we brought over were our apple computers because they can be plugged in with a simple converter. Other stuff, like kitchen appliances, you'll have to check voltage and if it's not at least 240 then it won't work here, even with a plug converter. It's best to buy kitchen appliances here.

An option would be to get a voltage converter to use with a plug converter but those voltage converters are very bulky. We had to get one for our printer and it is the size of a big black box. Having lots of voltage converters in your kitchen will take up lots of space and probably be more of a hassle than it's worth. Even a small voltage converter on top of a plug converter will need to be plugged into a power strip on the floor because all that weight won't fit on the wall.

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Post by JR8 » Fri, 17 May 2013 3:22 pm

Changing plugs is simple. But transformers are ugly things, and very heavy.

Forget about your big appliances, you might end up paying more to freight them than buying new. And you might rent a place that comes with appliances (it seems common), or in which your appliances will not fit.

Your computer.... well in my experience laptops have a voltage button on them, so you can switch 1110v - 240v.


p.s. When I moved from Europe to the US, the only electrical appliances I took were my hi-fi stack, that I ran through a transformer. And my desktop that I flipped from 240>110v.

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Post by Hannieroo » Fri, 17 May 2013 5:13 pm

We have one transformer we used it for seldom used but expensive things like drills. It is handy but not something you'd want attached to every appliance even if they were cheaper.

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Post by katbh » Fri, 17 May 2013 10:19 pm

Do not bring electricals. They are cheap here and also they do not last long in the humidity.
Bring furniture if employer paying BOTH ways. Make sure your contract specifies that they will pay for furniture going BACK as well.
But if not paying, you can get good cheap furniture here and there is a strong furniture hire system if you are not bringing.
There are also plenty of furnished apartments - maybe not to your taste but also maybe to your taste.
katbh

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Post by janiceliu88 » Sat, 18 May 2013 1:01 am

If you end up shipping your electricals (your computers, especially) remember to get insurance - my iMac came with a really hefty dent in spite of being bubble-wrapped into oblivion, and I'm so glad I had insurance for that.

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Post by cecilyb » Sat, 18 May 2013 3:38 am

Thanks for all the input. I saw someone mentioned that appliances don't last long in that kind of humidity, but I guess I'm having a hard time comprehending how bad the humidity actually is. Is it so bad that we shouldn't bring pictures and items like that? It's hard to imagine pretty much an entire household being left in storage for over 3 years and moving there with not much more than clothing, etc. and needing to start completely over with kitchen appliances and furniture. Again, the company will pay for everything because that's just their standard expat package.

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Post by katbh » Sat, 18 May 2013 8:31 am

The humidity is not too bad and most things will survive - especially if you blast the aircon every now and again to dry things out. But bikes and electrical appliances often suffer. If you leave things in cupboards they will go moody. Especially in the wetter/hotter months. You just need to keep an eye on everything. Do not let things sit for too long. Clean them, use them...Forget about them and the next time you see them they will be moody.
If you are at all worried or have precious things, an IF you think you would DEFINITELY be going back at the end of the three years, you may want to have the fun of starting fresh. At then end you can just take back any signature pieces that you bought here. BUT and this is a big BUT, many of my friends intended to stay only their 2 years...and now they have grown up children who they did not have when they came!
katbh

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 18 May 2013 9:19 am

katbh wrote:Clean them, use them...Forget about them and the next time you see them they will be moody.
Nice little play on words there, but I suspect it was unintentional.

They will be moldy, YOU will be moody! :lol:
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by nakatago » Sat, 18 May 2013 9:34 am

katbh wrote: Clean them, use them...Forget about them and the next time you see them they will be moody.
Yes. I had some slipcovers and bags that wouldn't talk to me for hours when I got them. It took a while before my duffel bag forgave me and only after I promised we'll get some ice cream with the pillow cases.
"A quokka is what would happen if there was an anime about kangaroos."

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Post by cecilyb » Sat, 18 May 2013 9:54 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:
katbh wrote:Clean them, use them...Forget about them and the next time you see them they will be moody.
Nice little play on words there, but I suspect it was unintentional.

They will be moldy, YOU will be moody! :lol:
That's pretty funny! I noticed the clean them and use them too. :D So dishes could actually grow mold just sitting in the cabinet? ETA: I'm having such a hard time imagining this because the thought of finding mold on anything where we live is completely foreign. So is the item covered in a layer of fuzzy mold or is it just spots of mold? What if you don't wear certain pieces of clothing very often, will those grow mold too? :o

I think our housing allowance will be about 8000-10,000 SGD. I haven't looked into it much but do places in that price range have decent air conditioning? We have central air and heat here in the US. Part of the reason we would consider this is to be able to travel throughout Asia, so what happens when we leave for 1-2 weeks?
I've read that a lot of people hire a maid, but I'm not sure I'm interested in that. So much to research, and I've barely scratched the surface on schools and International School vs. local school. :???:

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 18 May 2013 10:36 am

cecilyb wrote:
sundaymorningstaple wrote:
katbh wrote:Clean them, use them...Forget about them and the next time you see them they will be moody.
Nice little play on words there, but I suspect it was unintentional.

They will be moldy, YOU will be moody! :lol:
That's pretty funny! I noticed the clean them and use them too. :D So dishes could actually grow mold just sitting in the cabinet? ETA: I'm having such a hard time imagining this because the thought of finding mold on anything where we live is completely foreign. So is the item covered in a layer of fuzzy mold or is it just spots of mold? What if you don't wear certain pieces of clothing very often, will those grow mold too? :o

I think our housing allowance will be about 8000-10,000 SGD. I haven't looked into it much but do places in that price range have decent air conditioning? We have central air and heat here in the US. Part of the reason we would consider this is to be able to travel throughout Asia, so what happens when we leave for 1-2 weeks?
I've read that a lot of people hire a maid, but I'm not sure I'm interested in that. So much to research, and I've barely scratched the surface on schools and International School vs. local school. :???:

Leather, paper & other wood products are highly susceptible to mold growth as are walls if there is a seepage point from outside or enclosed piping (some walls are terrible in this aspect). Aircons are known for mold growth and a good cleaning is warranted regularly and not just with a vacuum cleaner. Look of one of our regulars, ev-disinfection, for mold knowledge as it is his whole business. A search here should turn up a number of photos and you can also check out his website as well.

Dishes aren't bad provided they are cleaned with hot water (not often done by most Asians here) but if you have a dishwasher (the mechanical kinds - not the domestic help). You shouldn't have too much problem there but, occasionally, little used frying pans will get some white mold spots growing on them. Not too much of the fuzzy stuff unless it your bread. We keep our bread in the freezer to give it a longer shelf life.
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by cecilyb » Sat, 18 May 2013 11:00 am

Thanks, I'll do a search for that username. In skimming a few posts, I've seen a few references to Hungry Hippos? I'm assuming that some sort of dehumidifier/desiccant? Is there anything else that will help with the humidity?

ETA: I've been reading through old posts about mold. If we leave all of our furniture here in storage, and buy new things at IKEA for instance, how do they prevent mold from growing on the furniture before you purchase it? Sorry about going on and on about this. We would be moving from a ver arid region of the US and I know nothing about seeing moldy spots all over your things.

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Post by katbh » Sat, 18 May 2013 12:07 pm

A quick blast of aircon every now and again usually fixes it. We do not use aircon much so we probably see more of it than most. But if you live as most people, you will have the aircon on much of the time and you will not have any problems. Aircon not only cools but also drys thing out. If you are going away for a length of time you can set your aircon unit to dehumidify (or dry) for a few hours a day.
And yes, it is very rare to find a place without good air-conditioning. Most places are fully set up for all rooms with strong aircons and many people live in arctic coldness for most of the time.

Yep... Moody v Mouldy comes from too early in the morning, too small a font and glasses that should have been sent for upgrade!
katbh

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