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Culture Shock - Arriving in singapore

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PNGMK
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Post by PNGMK » Sun, 23 Jun 2013 12:10 am

JR8 wrote:Apologies for 'flaking', I'm not the kind of person who likes saying I'm going to do something, and then not doing it.

My health/mobility varies day to day (rather like the smog), it can be hard to predict! This w/e has not been too great, and I haven't been out at all. I'm under-orders (Mrs JR8) that we both *have* to go out for dinner tonight, and I am NOT looking forward to the challenge one bit...

It'll be simpler when we're more settled in, and I look forward to finally meeting y'all then :)
Sorry to hear your health hasn't been great. I hate being ordered to 'take me out' as well but I do....

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Post by JR8 » Sun, 23 Jun 2013 10:48 am

PNGMK wrote:Sorry to hear your health hasn't been great. I hate being ordered to 'take me out' as well but I do....
This was one-step more inexplicable, it was going for dinner (out) with her extended family. No particular reason I -had- to be there.

Still ultimately I can just about do it, just it's a mental challenge/work, as when out you the have the thought of doing the journey back home hanging over you. However, it's a step-up from on the 4-odd months I spent in a hospital bed last year being treated and then relearning how to walk.


* On a happier note, and returning to the theme of 'Culture shock' - has anyone had the dish Ayam buah keluak? Just a 'little bit challenging'! :-D
-----------------
'The fresh fruit and seeds contain hydrogen cyanide and are deadly poisonous if consumed without prior preparation.[5][6][7] The seeds are first boiled and then buried in ash, banana leaves and earth for forty days,[8] during which time, they turn from a creamy white colour to dark brown or black.[9] The method relies on the fact that the hydrogen cyanide released by the boiling and fermentation is water soluble and easily washed out.

In Singapore and Malaysia, the seeds are best known as an essential ingredient in ayam (chicken) or babi (pork) buah keluak'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pangium_edule
--------------------

I was considering this food, and wondering who were the historic people who didn't survive the trial and error process of how to prepare it. And how desperately hungry they must have been ...

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Post by katbh » Sun, 23 Jun 2013 10:58 am

+ yes. But it tastes so good!

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Post by the lynx » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 9:14 am

JR8 wrote:
PNGMK wrote:Sorry to hear your health hasn't been great. I hate being ordered to 'take me out' as well but I do....
This was one-step more inexplicable, it was going for dinner (out) with her extended family. No particular reason I -had- to be there.

Still ultimately I can just about do it, just it's a mental challenge/work, as when out you the have the thought of doing the journey back home hanging over you. However, it's a step-up from on the 4-odd months I spent in a hospital bed last year being treated and then relearning how to walk.


* On a happier note, and returning to the theme of 'Culture shock' - has anyone had the dish Ayam buah keluak? Just a 'little bit challenging'! :-D
-----------------
'The fresh fruit and seeds contain hydrogen cyanide and are deadly poisonous if consumed without prior preparation.[5][6][7] The seeds are first boiled and then buried in ash, banana leaves and earth for forty days,[8] during which time, they turn from a creamy white colour to dark brown or black.[9] The method relies on the fact that the hydrogen cyanide released by the boiling and fermentation is water soluble and easily washed out.

In Singapore and Malaysia, the seeds are best known as an essential ingredient in ayam (chicken) or babi (pork) buah keluak'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pangium_edule
--------------------

I was considering this food, and wondering who were the historic people who didn't survive the trial and error process of how to prepare it. And how desperately hungry they must have been ...
I love that thing. Reminds me of my childhood, although I regret to say that I never learned to prepare buah keluak when my granny was still around.
I haven't had that for years!

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Post by v4jr4 » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 12:08 pm

the lynx wrote:I love that thing. Reminds me of my childhood, although I regret to say that I never learned to prepare buah keluak when my granny was still around.
I haven't had that for years!
The one that I have at Dulukala (somewhere around Bukit Timah) is pretty good. Ole Sayang at Melaka has this menu as well.
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Post by JR8 » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 12:11 pm

Brah wrote:Robert Frost, move over....
Thanks for the constructive input, but who is he?

Have you always lived in tower blocks? I haven't, about 5% of my life so far (all in Asia), much of the rest in villages and/or small and/or old houses. To me, the idea of 'vertical communities' is a very alien one.

I liked the visual juxtaposition of two old men, positioned identically so near, and yet oblivious of each each other. And then nearby the two maids, 'breaking the separateness' by leaning round a dividing balcony wall to chat.

Such symmetry and internal contradiction was something I used to really enjoy photographing back in the day.

Perhaps you remember...
http://forum.singaporeexpats.com/ftopic92318.html
'Photo Corner'

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the lynx
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Post by the lynx » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 1:02 pm

v4jr4 wrote:
the lynx wrote:I love that thing. Reminds me of my childhood, although I regret to say that I never learned to prepare buah keluak when my granny was still around.
I haven't had that for years!
The one that I have at Dulukala (somewhere around Bukit Timah) is pretty good. Ole Sayang at Melaka has this menu as well.
I think one can find this dish in every high-end Peranakan restaurant in Singapore. Have not seen it served in other types of restaurants.

BTW, welcome back v4jr4! It's been a while :)

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Post by QRM » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 1:30 pm

JR8 wrote: I was considering this food, and wondering who were the historic people who didn't survive the trial and error process of how to prepare it. And how desperately hungry they must have been ...
I often wonder how desperate for a cuppa one must be to go sifting through cat shitte for some beans. I tried it (surprising mild and no turd taste.),

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 1:45 pm

This stuff is pretty heavy..... and expensive!

Elephant Dung Coffee
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by QRM » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 2:35 pm

It will take a enterprising third world village to get all the villagers to eat raw coffee beans before they go to bed, next day collect it from the outdoor can and sell it to white folks in expensive hotels! I might try it myself see what it taste like?
Last edited by QRM on Mon, 24 Jun 2013 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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sundaymorningstaple
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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 2:38 pm

:shock: :lol:
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by zzm9980 » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 2:47 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:This stuff is pretty heavy..... and expensive!

Elephant Dung Coffee
I'd try it.

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Post by v4jr4 » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 3:27 pm

the lynx wrote:
v4jr4 wrote:
the lynx wrote:I love that thing. Reminds me of my childhood, although I regret to say that I never learned to prepare buah keluak when my granny was still around.
I haven't had that for years!
The one that I have at Dulukala (somewhere around Bukit Timah) is pretty good. Ole Sayang at Melaka has this menu as well.
I think one can find this dish in every high-end Peranakan restaurant in Singapore. Have not seen it served in other types of restaurants.

BTW, welcome back v4jr4! It's been a while :)
Somewhat, I'm lucky enough to receive the impact of the "bullets". Good thing is, I'm still alive and kickin' :lol:
"Budget Expat"

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Post by v4jr4 » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 3:31 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:This stuff is pretty heavy..... and expensive!

Elephant Dung Coffee
My lord. The luwak coffee doesn't give enough "kick". Not sure why, but I still put siphon (syphon?) method as the main suspect.

Not to mention elephant's durian dung, but I think I can try that one :lol:
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Post by kookaburrah » Mon, 24 Jun 2013 3:46 pm

JR8 wrote:
Brah wrote:Robert Frost, move over....
Thanks for the constructive input, but who is he?

Have you always lived in tower blocks? I haven't, about 5% of my life so far (all in Asia), much of the rest in villages and/or small and/or old houses. To me, the idea of 'vertical communities' is a very alien one.

I liked the visual juxtaposition of two old men, positioned identically so near, and yet oblivious of each each other. And then nearby the two maids, 'breaking the separateness' by leaning round a dividing balcony wall to chat.

Such symmetry and internal contradiction was something I used to really enjoy photographing back in the day.

Perhaps you remember...
http://forum.singaporeexpats.com/ftopic92318.html
'Photo Corner'
Hum, I may be wrong here, but I think that was all good natured teasing, JR8. The way you waxed lyrical on the vagaries of vertical living was quite poetically put, and the Frost dig made me smile.

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