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PR under PTS > quit job for PhD > REP renewal?

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the lynx
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PR under PTS > quit job for PhD > REP renewal?

Postby the lynx » Tue, 30 Apr 2013 11:22 am

So what if someone gets PR under PTS scheme, quits his job, pursues a PhD in local university (hence, no income/tax), and REP expires after that?

Since renewal of REP requires documents to prove CPF/income tax...

Any idea?

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 30 Apr 2013 1:18 pm

They would probably give a one year REP to do the PhD and then go from there at the next renewal, provided the individual is still here. This is assuming the PhD is directly related to the field of employment that the PTS was granted for initially.

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Postby the lynx » Tue, 30 Apr 2013 4:39 pm

What about the documentation during REP renewal? Since in ICA's page the renewal applicant is asked for either:

1. A letter (issued not more than one month ago) from the employer addressed to the Controller of Immigration, stating the date of employment, position held and monthly salary; or

2. Statement from the CPF Board showing the CPF Contribution History for the last 12 months; or

3. Income Tax Notice of Assessment for the last one year.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 30 Apr 2013 7:39 pm

One should visit Immigration before setting out on that type of journey and try to get something from them in writing so that when the course was finished, that would suffice for documentary evidence. Again, uncharted territory for me and no anecdotal evidence so a trip to ICA might be in order (rather than a phone call) before embarking on something like that.

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Re: PR under PTS > quit job for PhD > REP renewal?

Postby x9200 » Wed, 01 May 2013 8:18 am

the lynx wrote:So what if someone gets PR under PTS scheme, quits his job, pursues a PhD in local university (hence, no income/tax), and REP expires after that?

Since renewal of REP requires documents to prove CPF/income tax...

Any idea?

Are you going to cover the course fees from your own pocket? If not, and there will be a scholarship involved you may have an income depending on the scholarship extent.

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Postby iloverice » Thu, 02 May 2013 5:09 pm

I did call ICA few years ago to enquire this, as I have plan to go back to school for an MBA :D could I work part-time? And the officer told me, I still need to maintain my full time job (because I obtain my PR from PT scheme). So, I cancelled that plan as I know I will not be able to cope with part-time programme and full time job.

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Postby rdueej » Tue, 23 Jul 2013 4:50 pm

I have looked into this issue for quite sometime now and might be able to provide some information.

In general, a student is admitted into a PhD programme only if they are going to be fully funded. It is extremely rare for a PhD candidate to be paying any expense out of pocket.

The PhD scholarship would cover your tuition fees and also provide for a monthly stipend each month (~2500 per month). To earn this income you are expected to take on part-time teaching assignments for undergraduates. This scholarship income (or you could say part-time employment) is subject to both tax and cpf deductions. So, you will have your your tax assessment as well cpf record. You could call this the full-time-study/part-time-work route.

There is another option which is also possible. The university is normally willing to hire the PhD student as full-time staff and then admit them as a part-time PhD candidate. The work would be the same and the pay around ~3000 per month. There is some extra money here because you will be expected to pay for tuition from this salary. The tax and cpf statements would be easily obtainable (the same as for normal university employees). You could call this the full-time-work/part-time-study route.

Both work out to the same thing eventually. I only suspect that the second route might be an easier option when it comes to renewal time.

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Postby the lynx » Tue, 03 Sep 2013 3:43 pm

rdueej wrote:I have looked into this issue for quite sometime now and might be able to provide some information.

In general, a student is admitted into a PhD programme only if they are going to be fully funded. It is extremely rare for a PhD candidate to be paying any expense out of pocket.

The PhD scholarship would cover your tuition fees and also provide for a monthly stipend each month (~2500 per month). To earn this income you are expected to take on part-time teaching assignments for undergraduates. This scholarship income (or you could say part-time employment) is subject to both tax and cpf deductions. So, you will have your your tax assessment as well cpf record. You could call this the full-time-study/part-time-work route.

There is another option which is also possible. The university is normally willing to hire the PhD student as full-time staff and then admit them as a part-time PhD candidate. The work would be the same and the pay around ~3000 per month. There is some extra money here because you will be expected to pay for tuition from this salary. The tax and cpf statements would be easily obtainable (the same as for normal university employees). You could call this the full-time-work/part-time-study route.

Both work out to the same thing eventually. I only suspect that the second route might be an easier option when it comes to renewal time.


I'm revisiting this option. rdueej, any idea how it might work for a PR holder under PTS?

Someone I know pointed out that applying for PhD as a PR will be a plus point because the fees are lower compared to foreigner applicant. But then again, applying for PR for the sake of cheaper fees for PhD shouts 'abuser' IMHO.

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Postby zzm9980 » Tue, 03 Sep 2013 6:33 pm

the lynx wrote: But then again, applying for PR for the sake of cheaper fees for PhD shouts 'abuser' IMHO.


Well, are you planning to give up your PR as soon as you get your PhD? Or are you planning to stick around and work as long as it makes sense? I think your overall intentions are what matter here.

Person A who premptively plans to get PR, start their PhD, buy their HDB, and then dump the PR and HDB the day they receive the PhD is an abused.

Person B who uses the cheaper school fees at the impetus to apply for the PR now, and believes they'll likely stick around to work after graduating isn't doing anything wrong.

Don't let the opinions of some frequent posters who act like everything is black and white discourage you from applying. Besides, you're FOTM. They want you here. Please marry a nice local Chinese boy and have a pair of boys while you're at it. :P

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Postby PNGMK » Tue, 03 Sep 2013 9:39 pm

iloverice wrote:I did call ICA few years ago to enquire this, as I have plan to go back to school for an MBA :D could I work part-time? And the officer told me, I still need to maintain my full time job (because I obtain my PR from PT scheme). So, I cancelled that plan as I know I will not be able to cope with part-time programme and full time job.


You're an academic weakling maybe. I've completed a M.Eng while working fulltime and that's a lot harder than some poxy MBA ;)

Putting aside my snark - if an MBA will help you in your career - do it now rather than later. Make the sacrifices to do it. You'll NEVER take a break from work to do it full time - the opportunity cost is too great. I should have done my M.Eng in my 30's - not my 40's.

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Postby bloodhound123 » Wed, 04 Sep 2013 12:21 am

PNGMK wrote:
iloverice wrote:I did call ICA few years ago to enquire this, as I have plan to go back to school for an MBA :D could I work part-time? And the officer told me, I still need to maintain my full time job (because I obtain my PR from PT scheme). So, I cancelled that plan as I know I will not be able to cope with part-time programme and full time job.


You're an academic weakling maybe. I've completed a M.Eng while working fulltime and that's a lot harder than some poxy MBA ;)

Putting aside my snark - if an MBA will help you in your career - do it now rather than later. Make the sacrifices to do it. You'll NEVER take a break from work to do it full time - the opportunity cost is too great. I should have done my M.Eng in my 30's - not my 40's.


I am not sure if a part-time MBA carries any value at all. I have friends who went to INSEAD and are struggling to find the in right job in Singapore. Many of them moved to Dubai to work in fund management firms. Pursuing a MBA from a mid-ranking or a low-ranking school might even trigger a downgrade in your career in the present circumstances.

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Postby Wd40 » Wed, 04 Sep 2013 6:51 am

bloodhound123 wrote:
PNGMK wrote:
iloverice wrote:I did call ICA few years ago to enquire this, as I have plan to go back to school for an MBA :D could I work part-time? And the officer told me, I still need to maintain my full time job (because I obtain my PR from PT scheme). So, I cancelled that plan as I know I will not be able to cope with part-time programme and full time job.


You're an academic weakling maybe. I've completed a M.Eng while working fulltime and that's a lot harder than some poxy MBA ;)

Putting aside my snark - if an MBA will help you in your career - do it now rather than later. Make the sacrifices to do it. You'll NEVER take a break from work to do it full time - the opportunity cost is too great. I should have done my M.Eng in my 30's - not my 40's.


I am not sure if a part-time MBA carries any value at all. I have friends who went to INSEAD and are struggling to find the in right job in Singapore. Many of them moved to Dubai to work in fund management firms. Pursuing a MBA from a mid-ranking or a low-ranking school might even trigger a downgrade in your career in the present circumstances.


Yeah, I agree, we live in a completely different world now, compared to even before 2008. The financial crisis has pretty much killed the hype of MBA degrees.

Now its a matter of holding on to your job tight tight and make hay while the sun shines.

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Postby the lynx » Wed, 04 Sep 2013 8:29 am

PNGMK wrote:
iloverice wrote:I did call ICA few years ago to enquire this, as I have plan to go back to school for an MBA :D could I work part-time? And the officer told me, I still need to maintain my full time job (because I obtain my PR from PT scheme). So, I cancelled that plan as I know I will not be able to cope with part-time programme and full time job.


You're an academic weakling maybe. I've completed a M.Eng while working fulltime and that's a lot harder than some poxy MBA ;)

Putting aside my snark - if an MBA will help you in your career - do it now rather than later. Make the sacrifices to do it. You'll NEVER take a break from work to do it full time - the opportunity cost is too great. I should have done my M.Eng in my 30's - not my 40's.


I'm curious, did you do your M.Eng in research mode or coursework mode?

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Postby x9200 » Wed, 04 Sep 2013 9:10 am

Lynx, anything here fits your profile?
http://www.a-star.edu.sg/Awards-Scholar ... ments.aspx
(don't get scared by aggressive rhetorics)

Note the intentions of the stakeholders: Eligibility [..] other nationals intending to take up Singapore citizenship. This is also for full time PhD so I don't think this would put you in a wrong position.

How long is it from your graduation?

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Postby the lynx » Wed, 04 Sep 2013 9:50 am

x9200 wrote:Lynx, anything here fits your profile?
http://www.a-star.edu.sg/Awards-Scholar ... ments.aspx
(don't get scared by aggressive rhetorics)

Note the intentions of the stakeholders: Eligibility [..] other nationals intending to take up Singapore citizenship. This is also for full time PhD so I don't think this would put you in a wrong position.

How long is it from your graduation?


Thanks x92. Will PM you.


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