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stiwi
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Re: connecting 2 wireless routers to M1 fibre Huawei ONT

Postby stiwi » Wed, 02 Oct 2013 6:58 pm

Tanuki wrote:
zzm9980 wrote:
Cancel M1 and sign up for a provider who will give you more than a single static IP.

I have been in the process of narrowing down my choices for the ISP when we move in to our place in 2 weeks. ViewQwest is a few bucks more for an extra 50 mbps (over MR) but the kicker to me is the 5 IP's you get with it. Nice!


You get 8 IPs but at an extra charge of $50/month, otherwise you get just 1 static IP.

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Re: connecting 2 wireless routers to M1 fibre Huawei ONT

Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 02 Oct 2013 8:46 pm

Tanuki wrote:
zzm9980 wrote:
Cancel M1 and sign up for a provider who will give you more than a single static IP.

I have been in the process of narrowing down my choices for the ISP when we move in to our place in 2 weeks. ViewQwest is a few bucks more for an extra 50 mbps (over MR) but the kicker to me is the 5 IP's you get with it. Nice!


The only reason I didn't go with VQ was that they were slow to respond to my email inquiries, and MR had a sales booth close enough to my office I could visit them at lunch. (AMK Central)

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Tanuki
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Re: connecting 2 wireless routers to M1 fibre Huawei ONT

Postby Tanuki » Wed, 02 Oct 2013 10:31 pm

stiwi wrote:
Tanuki wrote:
zzm9980 wrote:
Cancel M1 and sign up for a provider who will give you more than a single static IP.

I have been in the process of narrowing down my choices for the ISP when we move in to our place in 2 weeks. ViewQwest is a few bucks more for an extra 50 mbps (over MR) but the kicker to me is the 5 IP's you get with it. Nice!


You get 8 IPs but at an extra charge of $50/month, otherwise you get just 1 static IP.

8 is true, but one is the network address, one is broadcast and one is for the router they give you. Thus you have 5 IP's to use as you like. The form splits to the second page in that area, so I didn't notice the part of it being $50 per month. Hmmm, not so great after all then.

nada5521
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Postby nada5521 » Sun, 17 Nov 2013 1:37 am

Image

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zzm9980
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Postby zzm9980 » Sun, 17 Nov 2013 7:50 am

nada5521 wrote: use this link http://www.xxxxxxxxxxx.com/downloads.php , its my best vpn service , its very fast , easy in use and working without annoying ads


(censoring the link so I don't propagate spam)

Everyone remember: "If you're not paying for something, you're not the customer; you're the product being sold."

Don't trust a 'free' VPN, especially if it claims to operate without ads. That means they're probably just stealing your passwords or serving you malware for a paying client.

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Postby LicaFronte » Thu, 07 Aug 2014 2:40 am

Check this one out:

Image

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aster
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Postby aster » Thu, 07 Aug 2014 3:05 am

3...2...1....

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zzm9980
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Postby zzm9980 » Thu, 07 Aug 2014 4:23 am

Besides your VPN service being ridiculously overpriced, why would you want a VPN based out of Singapore?

That's a rhetorical question btw. If you really don't know why you wouldn't, check this other thread:
ftopic102999.html

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aster
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Postby aster » Thu, 07 Aug 2014 6:56 pm

It's also important to know what it's to be used for. If for using Netflix/Hulu then ideally you want a provider that has a server in Singapore (all good providers should have servers in a few dozen cities) that shows up under a US IP address.

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zzm9980
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Postby zzm9980 » Fri, 08 Aug 2014 1:26 am

aster wrote:It's also important to know what it's to be used for. If for using Netflix/Hulu then ideally you want a provider that has a server in Singapore (all good providers should have servers in a few dozen cities) that shows up under a US IP address.


In most cases it would be better to just connect directly to a US VPN provider. Those "multi hop" VPNs don't really do anything for you. They almost assuredly do not have their own direct circuit between hops so you're still at the mercy of Internet routing and the speed of light to get to the US.

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Postby curiousgeorge » Fri, 08 Aug 2014 8:45 am

I've stopped using VPNs.

I switched to a "smartDNS" provider. Instead of connecting via servers in another county, you basically spoof your DNS server into thinking you are in a different country.

Traffic goes via your ISP instead of some far-off server which usually means better speeds. Not encrypted like a VPN though, so if you need that it won't work for you.

For me, this was a far better solution than VPN, because most TV boxes and some phones/tablets don't allow for a VPN service, but they *do* allow you to edit your DNS server.

IIRC, MyRepublic does this natively - i.e. if you are on MR, then you can use Netflix etc without doing anything.

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Postby zzm9980 » Fri, 08 Aug 2014 8:58 am

curiousgeorge wrote:I've stopped using VPNs.

I switched to a "smartDNS" provider. Instead of connecting via servers in another county, you basically spoof your DNS server into thinking you are in a different country.

Traffic goes via your ISP instead of some far-off server which usually means better speeds. Not encrypted like a VPN though, so if you need that it won't work for you.

For me, this was a far better solution than VPN, because most TV boxes and some phones/tablets don't allow for a VPN service, but they *do* allow you to edit your DNS server.

IIRC, MyRepublic does this natively - i.e. if you are on MR, then you can use Netflix etc without doing anything.


It is definitely a better solution if you're only using a VPN for streaming TV.

Myrepublic and Viewquest both do it flawlessly. Used it on my AppleTV and everything worked without a hitch.

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aster
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Postby aster » Fri, 08 Aug 2014 10:47 pm

Very true, a DNS-based solution is perfect when it comes to using Netflix/Hulu. These services check your IP location only when connecting, as soon as that clears the content is streamed straight from them to you in the fastest way (unlike VPNs, where the VPN server acts like an intermediary and all traffic is routed through it).

As mentioned, providers such as ViewQwest or MyRepublic often offer such a service on their end, fooling the likes of Netflix that your IP address is actually in the US. :)

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Postby zzm9980 » Sat, 09 Aug 2014 12:35 am

aster wrote:Very true, a DNS-based solution is perfect when it comes to using Netflix/Hulu. These services check your IP location only when connecting, as soon as that clears the content is streamed straight from them to you in the fastest way (unlike VPNs, where the VPN server acts like an intermediary and all traffic is routed through it).

As mentioned, providers such as ViewQwest or MyRepublic often offer such a service on their end, fooling the likes of Netflix that your IP address is actually in the US. :)


I was actually under the impression it wasn't this simple. The VPN services redirect you to a transparent proxy server in the appropriate geo location which then retrieves your content. It's a simpler configuration for your appliances on your network, but on the backend it is just as complicated (or more so) as a VPN.

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aster
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Postby aster » Sat, 09 Aug 2014 1:23 am

zzm9980 wrote:I was actually under the impression it wasn't this simple. The VPN services redirect you to a transparent proxy server in the appropriate geo location which then retrieves your content. It's a simpler configuration for your appliances on your network, but on the backend it is just as complicated (or more so) as a VPN.


Doing it the DNS way is extremely simple. It makes VPN look like rocket science in comparison if you are to use Apple TV this way.

Both ways require you to pay some small monthly fee, but with DNS-based solutions what you get in return is just a single IP address to use in your DNS settings. In fact all you have to do to make Apple TV work from here under any ISP is to just enter the ATV menu, go into internet settings, and input this DNS number there. That's it, nothing else required.


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