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Hannieroo
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Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 8:12 am

I never thought I'd be grateful for rain. After 4 years in the Aberdeenshire hills I thought I'd seen enough precipitation to last me a life time. But no, on the days there is no rain here you can feel the pressure. The last few days have felt like a vacuum.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 8:48 am

You must not have had to drive across the island like I between 7 & 8 (an hour for a normal early morning jaunt of 25 minutes.) I like it when it rains all night as I don't use aircons. But unfortunately, Singaporean drivers in the rain, lose the remainder of the miniscule driving abilities that they normally have. :cry:

Hannieroo
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Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 8:53 am

I figured that would be the case. I've been driving the children to school near Holland then taking husband out to Pioneer so I can keep the car. Today I told him I was more than happy to be without. The thought of those mental truck drivers in poor visibility with reduced stopping distances put me right off.

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Postby BedokAmerican » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 3:04 pm

Ok, here's something else that surprised me about Singapore. Not that this is a big deal, but I figured I'd mention it:

The swimsuits people wear at the pool.

There are a high number of people who wear what appear to be "wet-suits" that I would think would be worn for cold-water surfing. This is true for children (both boys and girls) as well as women. There is also a high number of adult males who wear speedos.

Now, at first I thought maybe the "wet-suit" style was because it provides more sun protection, but I've also heard it's probably that Asians are more conservative. Maybe it's both. I don't know.

But about speedos, that surprised me because where I come from, speedos are usually only worn by competitive swimmers and babies/small children. But here, lots of men wear them, even heavy-set old men.

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Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 4:43 pm

BedokAmerican wrote:There are a high number of people who wear what appear to be "wet-suits" that I would think would be worn for cold-water surfing. This is true for children (both boys and girls) as well as women. There is also a high number of adult males who wear speedos.


That's easy. Muslims and gay guys. Singapore has lots of both.

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Postby nakatago » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 5:24 pm

zzm9980 wrote:
BedokAmerican wrote:There are a high number of people who wear what appear to be "wet-suits" that I would think would be worn for cold-water surfing. This is true for children (both boys and girls) as well as women. There is also a high number of adult males who wear speedos.


That's easy. Muslims and gay guys. Singapore has lots of both.


Don't forget about the people who think too highly of themselves.

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Postby Hannieroo » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 7:48 pm

Some people just don't get that the Peter Stringfellow look is a bad one.

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Postby Brah » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 9:18 pm

BedokAmerican wrote:Ok, here's something else that surprised me about Singapore. Not that this is a big deal, but I figured I'd mention it:

The swimsuits people wear at the pool.

There are a high number of people who wear what appear to be "wet-suits" that I would think would be worn for cold-water surfing.

They're not for cold water surfing or wet suits, which are made of a rubber-like material and much thicker. They are rash guards made of nylon and are for warm water surfing, though they use them here to not get tanned and to stay warm, mostly from the wind, as some of those people are swimming instructors who are in the water much of the day.

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Postby thismyvoice » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 10:27 pm

BedokAmerican wrote:One of the things that surprised me the most when I moved here a few months back was how clueless people are here. When going into a store and asking an employee a simple question about where an item is located or if they sell something particular and they look at you like you're a ghost. They'll often say they don't have something just because they don't want to deal with you or they'll try and bluff their way.

Now, SOMETIMES people can be helpful and know what they're talking about, but more often than not, they're totally clueless. They usually won't say something like, "I'm not sure, let me check."

Also, oftentimes security guards don't even know their way around the buildings where they work.

Now, please please please please forgive me for sounding racist, but most Asians living in America are very smart and articulate (although there are some exceptions). I know this isn't America, but I suppose I thought that would be the case worldwide and that Singapore would be filled with smart, articulate people. Like I said, SOME people here are bright and articulate but most aren't. This was one of the things that has surprised me about Singapore.


Never had a problem asking salespeople about products in NTUC, Challenger, Cold Storage, etc. Maybe they don't understand what you are trying to say?

Regarding smart and articulate people in Singapore. Intelligence of Singaporeans like in all countries follow the bell curve. It has its fair share of intelligent people and fools. The not so bright cannot just disappear.

There are 300,000 foreigners on E-pass/S-pass and close to a million Work-permit holders not in the construction sector. Many of these are Asians and not all are employed in Singapore on the basis of their intelligence. Back in the old days, PR were even given to hawkers and masseurs.

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Postby sensei_ » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 10:42 pm

offshoreoildude wrote: Other first world advanced countries lock down the entire crossing in all directions - which of course allows pedestrians to cross diagonally as well. Stupid LTA.


australia not one of those first world countries. infact, we go backwards and remove the ability to walk diagonally.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 11:13 pm

thismyvoice wrote:It has its fair share of............. fools. The not so bright cannot just disappear.



Truer words were never spoken. The sad part of this is they are going to be the new PMETs according to the Government. The country is going to hell in a handbasket. FFS, half of the local PMETs are already being carried by their subordinates. :roll:

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 11:35 pm

Hannieroo wrote:I never thought I'd be grateful for rain. After 4 years in the Aberdeenshire hills I thought I'd seen enough precipitation to last me a life time. But no, on the days there is no rain here you can feel the pressure. The last few days have felt like a vacuum.


Interesting point. As a country-boy in England I just grew us subconsciously 'feeling' the weather and having a say subconscious 1, 3, 6hr forecast in my head based upon things like:
- Temperature
- Perceived humidity
- Cloud cover
- Wind speed and direction
- Animal behaviour (cows lying down etc)
- Sunset type/colour etc
It's nothing special, it's just instinct, and was generally quite reliable.

But my point is, in Singapore I could physically feel the change in weather, and it was very clear, and strange. I could feel when there was momentum behind a drop in air pressure, almost like pressure in or on my head. That was when you'd expect a storm to be coming in... the steps were...
- more cloud and/or darkening sky
- air pressure putting the zap on your head
- the final confirmation is the 'wind before the storm' when you damned well better go and close or fix ajar your windows at home!
- And then KA-BOOM!

I welcomed the big storms in SG. They were usually quite brief, and they knocked the smog out, and also knocked out the pollen, and washed away all the pollen that was already on the ground. Once the storm had passed through, the air was so much fresher, cleaner and healthier, plus the thermometer was at least briefly on the back-foot...

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Postby Hannieroo » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 8:18 am

It is strange, it's lovely then suddenly it gets to a point where it just needs to rain and then it's lovely again. I think where we are was 5 days without and the air was too tight. Absolutely cracking today though.

I'm surprised about the lack of window cleaners. I did know it was something that people did themselves or just left and the heights make it difficult. Houston was the same, gardeners everywhere but you have to wash your own windows. Almost the exact opposite of the UK.

And the size of the kitchens. For a country that likes to cook there is little storage. I can only assume people prefer to shop every day. I don't think my LL knows what to make of me shelving out the helper's room and calling it a pantry.

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Postby nakatago » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 9:04 am

sensei_ wrote:
offshoreoildude wrote: Other first world advanced countries lock down the entire crossing in all directions - which of course allows pedestrians to cross diagonally as well. Stupid LTA.


australia not one of those first world countries. infact, we go backwards and remove the ability to walk diagonally.


Maybe in Perth.

(cue Perth jokes)

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 9:10 am

The country doesn't like to cook. That's why there are so many eating places and such small kitchens in homes. Most eat in hawker centres so there is less clean up and most new wives don't/can't cook anyway (interferes with their careers). Therefore the restaurant/eating house/hawker centres abound.

When I bought my flat I designed my own kitchen and one of the biggest items was substantial storage space and counter space (still not enough of that though). I can carry a month's worth of staples if need be (and usually do). Most of the locals who come to my house can't believe the amount of foodstuffs I keep. But we don't eat out. My wife is an excellent cook in her own right and has always cooks for a small crowd since she was a young girl. (She was the eldest of 7 children).

Window cleaners. This is another story. Most make their maids do it. And you often read about maids falling to their deaths because of a lack of a security harness. Washing windows is a real pain if living in homes without balconys and such. Even having professionals have a problem as there are no gondolas on residential buildings. I have always been the washer in my family.


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