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Canada vs Singapore lifestyle

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Wd40
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Postby Wd40 » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 10:40 pm

To me a perfect place for everybody is a climate like in say Bali or Thailand. Singapore the heat is actually quite ok, its the humidity that kills you. But even then in a tropical climate as long as you are not working outdoors, anybody can survive, even old. But you cant say the same thing about cold climates.

Take the coldest extreme the north and south pole and take the hottest extreme, desert in the middle east. Its is easier to survive in a desert than the poles.

The reason is when you say hot, how hot are we talking about? If its a tropical climate we are talking 35 deg celcius, thats not too far from body temperature. When we are talking about cold, even moderate cold it is 0-10 deg and thats far from body temperature and more "abnormal" for the body than the heat in tropical climate.

With tropical climate you get brightness and sunshine and with cold climate you get darkness and gloom, the choice is easy. Thats why I said there is a reason why the oldest civilizations started in hotter areas.

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Postby JR8 » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 11:53 pm

Wd40 wrote:Take the coldest extreme the north and south pole and take the hottest extreme, desert in the middle east. Its is easier to survive in a desert than the poles.


Hmmmm... a debatable point.

If you have suitable clothing I'd rather be seeking to survive in a cold place than a desert any day.

Your #1 priority is water. If you are generally healthy you can live on water alone for a month+, and Ice/snow = water. In a desert you have little realistic chance of finding any water at all, in the minimal time you have to find it. Similar goes with availability of food.

If you are going to die from cold, you do so via hypothermia which leads to unconsciousness. In the heat, you get heat stroke that leads via delirium to a shortish but most unpleasant death.

Just my 2c

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 11:59 pm

Wd40 wrote:To me a perfect place for everybody is a climate like in say Bali or Thailand. Singapore the heat is actually quite ok, its the humidity that kills you. But even then in a tropical climate as long as you are not working outdoors, anybody can survive, even old. But you cant say the same thing about cold climates.

Take the coldest extreme the north and south pole and take the hottest extreme, desert in the middle east. Its is easier to survive in a desert than the poles.

The reason is when you say hot, how hot are we talking about? If its a tropical climate we are talking 35 deg celcius, thats not too far from body temperature. When we are talking about cold, even moderate cold it is 0-10 deg and thats far from body temperature and more "abnormal" for the body than the heat in tropical climate.

With tropical climate you get brightness and sunshine and with cold climate you get darkness and gloom, the choice is easy. Thats why I said there is a reason why the oldest civilizations started in hotter areas.


You, obviously, haven't traveled much. The capital of the US often hit's 40+C in the summer months. Death valley in the US is the hottest location in the world, Including the gulf states in the Middle east or the Sahara.

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Postby iamsen » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 12:20 am

I hate the sun, daylight and daytime in general.

The bright light hurts my eyes. The heat drains my energy and makes me lethargic. It causes me to sweat, something that is uncomfortable and causes a stink and dirties clothes.

If it gets cold, I'll hide under a blanket and all is well.

Cold is better.


You are right that it's not really that hot in Sg, just too bloody humid. How high do the temps go? 38?

I've been in Japanese and Aussie summers where the afternoon temperatures regularly hit the mid 40s. It still stings to be out under the sun but it's not as humid which makes it somewhat better.

But it's still better to be cold.

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Postby vink2 » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 9:13 am

movingtospore wrote:
vink2 wrote:
x9200 wrote:Service is better in Singapore.



Surely you jest.


No, I don't jest, it is true, service is far much better in Singapore compare to Australia and extremely far much better compare to New Zealand.

You are working in Australian service industry... sorry for that :cry:

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Postby zzm9980 » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 6:01 pm

Wd40 wrote:Its not the temperature in itself that I am worried about, it is the overall darkness and gloominess. You know, not seeing the sun for days.


I'm the opposite. I prefer overcast or cloudy days. I'm sure I'm not the only one. Although I do know some people like you that claim they get depressed without the sun. Of course most of those were emo whiners who got depressed over a whole host of things. (Including an Ex! :P)

edit: Actually a quick google, it really is a symptom of depression. Explains the Ex for sure. Maybe you should get yourself checked out ;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seasonal_a ... e_disorder


Wd40 wrote: Its is easier to survive in a desert than the poles.


You should do a bit of research on what a 'desert' actually is. The largest desert in the world is at the south pole, and the second largest the north pole.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_de ... ar_regions

I'll admit I understand what I think you meant though. :) Without research, my guess would be that with enough water (and UV protection), the body will survive in extreme heat easier than extreme cold.

I'm not sure I'd call Bali or Thailand ideal climates. I would personally like 22-24c constantly without killer humidity. Actually, going back to your first topic, about depression without sun, I think I get depressed without season change of any sort. Northern California was mostly ideal for me. "Summers" (about 7-9 months) in the 20-24c range. "Winters" cloudy and rainy, 14-18c. The 'rain' rarely was hard enough to justify an umbrella or even wipers in the car. In the seven years I lived there, I can recall only two thunder storms, and only one morning it was cold enough to see frost (It was gone by ~9am).

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Postby JR8 » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 7:31 pm

zzm9980 wrote: I do know some people like you that claim they get depressed without the sun. Of course most of those were emo whiners who got depressed over a whole host of things. (Including an Ex! :P)

edit: Actually a quick google, it really is a symptom of depression. Explains the Ex for sure. Maybe you should get yourself checked out ;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seasonal_a ... e_disorder


I definitely get this, as does my father. In common parlance it is called 'winter blues'.

Today I'm feeling significantly jollier and more invigorated than I have been recently, simply because today we have sunshine plus a largely blue sky, for the first time in a several weeks!

p.s. Greenland has the highest rate of suicide in the world. Over double 2nd place Belgium, 9* both the US and UK rate, and 15* SG. I'm not saying it's all down to UV light, but I believe it plays a part.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_co ... icide_rate
Greenland 108.1/100k/year
Belgium 53.5/as above
USA 12.0
UK 11.8
SG 7.1


p.s. Canada is at 11.5

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Postby x9200 » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 8:18 pm

zzm9980 wrote:
Wd40 wrote:Its not the temperature in itself that I am worried about, it is the overall darkness and gloominess. You know, not seeing the sun for days.


I'm the opposite. I prefer overcast or cloudy days. I'm sure I'm not the only one.

No, you are not, I prefer when it is cloudy or rains in Singapore (and I commute with a motorbike) and I like winter, subzero temperatures and snowy (and misty) landscapes. How one can replace a singularity of Singapore weather with all the multiseason's colors, smells and scenarios? Only for having the seasons, how the nature changes following them is worth everything the climate of Singapore can offer.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 10:29 pm

Normal max temp is 33C but hottest on record I believe is only 34 C. Normal is 31~32 C. No, To me hot is better. Cold causes frostbite when you run out of heating oil, (which if the power companies run out, so do electricity) or firewood. Then you freeze. rUnless you have a team of huskies. (That's where the name of the group came from - Three Dog Night - damn cold night).

iamsen wrote:I hate the sun, daylight and daytime in general.

The bright light hurts my eyes. The heat drains my energy and makes me lethargic. It causes me to sweat, something that is uncomfortable and causes a stink and dirties clothes.

If it gets cold, I'll hide under a blanket and all is well.

Cold is better.


You are right that it's not really that hot in Sg, just too bloody humid. How high do the temps go? 38?

I've been in Japanese and Aussie summers where the afternoon temperatures regularly hit the mid 40s. It still stings to be out under the sun but it's not as humid which makes it somewhat better.

But it's still better to be cold.

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Postby zzm9980 » Mon, 08 Apr 2013 8:07 am

x9200 wrote: how the nature changes following them is worth everything the climate of Singapore can offer.


My favorite time of the year is mid to late Autumn in the northern hemisphere. Particularly upper midwest (Michigan and Wisconsin) or New England when the leaves change color. I believe most people coming from a mono-climate who lived through a full season change and actually saw it (not sitting in the suburban office park cubicle their body shop employer stuck them at) would truly appreciate it and likely change their perspective.

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Postby Wd40 » Mon, 08 Apr 2013 8:49 am

iamsen wrote:I hate the sun, daylight and daytime in general.

The bright light hurts my eyes. The heat drains my energy and makes me lethargic. It causes me to sweat, something that is uncomfortable and causes a stink and dirties clothes.

If it gets cold, I'll hide under a blanket and all is well.

Cold is better.


You are right that it's not really that hot in Sg, just too bloody humid. How high do the temps go? 38?

I've been in Japanese and Aussie summers where the afternoon temperatures regularly hit the mid 40s. It still stings to be out under the sun but it's not as humid which makes it somewhat better.

But it's still better to be cold.


Haha, I guess you are chinese local. Of all the locals I have seen, its the chinese that I have noticed finding the heat and humidity the most uncomfortable with. I have seen some sweating profusely :) May be something to do with their skin as originally the chinese skin is meant to be in a colder weather. Malays and Indians on the other hand, take the heat and humidity as a piece of cake.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 08 Apr 2013 10:44 am

I ride the MRT daily from west to east at the end of the work day and from south to north up Serangoon way. I'm afraid I don't quite agree with you assessment of Malay and Indians. Sorry.

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Postby iamsen » Mon, 08 Apr 2013 10:54 am

zzm9980 wrote:I believe most people coming from a mono-climate who lived through a full season change and actually saw it (not sitting in the suburban office park cubicle their body shop employer stuck them at) would truly appreciate it and likely change their perspective.


Couldn't agree more with this. Watching the seasons change is just amazing. Now if we could solve the sticky problem of eliminating summer from existence.

Winter -> Spring- > Autumn -> repeat. That's all I ask for. Please god.

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Postby iamsen » Mon, 08 Apr 2013 10:56 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:I ride the MRT daily from west to east at the end of the work day and from south to north up Serangoon way. I'm afraid I don't quite agree with you assessment of Malay and Indians. Sorry.


My observation is that darker skinned folks seem to sweat a lot more profusely. I suppose it's just physics in action.

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Postby Wd40 » Mon, 08 Apr 2013 1:30 pm

iamsen wrote:
sundaymorningstaple wrote:I ride the MRT daily from west to east at the end of the work day and from south to north up Serangoon way. I'm afraid I don't quite agree with you assessment of Malay and Indians. Sorry.


My observation is that darker skinned folks seem to sweat a lot more profusely. I suppose it's just physics in action.


But darker skin is able to withstand heat and sun more easily than white/yellow skin,no? I thought thats why africans are black.

In India its very clear, in the north kashmir and himalayas has absolutely fair skin and there is snow there. In south india and srilanka people are the darkest and its hot like singapore there. In between the 2 regions, lots of browns.


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