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No Cooking Allowed

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iloverice
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Postby iloverice » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:16 pm

chronoel wrote:we're renting a room..


Well, since you are renting a room, then it's up to the landlord to decide on whether you can cook or not. The contract state provide the gas, but never state that you are allowed to cook (am I right?).

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Postby chronoel » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:20 pm

Should it be specifically stated?

I mean for example there is a faucet in the kitchen and we want to get water. Since it's not stated in the contract that there's a faucet in the kitchen, then does it mean we cannot get potable water? Or we can't use the pathway to the door since it's not stated in the contract. Simple things like right of way can be denied simply because it's not stated. Is that what is meant by this?

:(

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nakatago
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Postby nakatago » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:28 pm

chronoel wrote:Should it be specifically stated?

I mean for example there is a faucet in the kitchen and we want to get water. Since it's not stated in the contract that there's a faucet in the kitchen, then does it mean we cannot get potable water? Or we can't use the pathway to the door since it's not stated in the contract. Simple things like right of way can be denied simply because it's not stated. Is that what is meant by this?

:(


Even if it weren't, if the landlord is there and he tells you not to cook and if you try and he threatens you with eviction or some other sanction, what can you do?

You don't have leverage.

Take it up with your agent, however. If he basically tells you to just bear it, approach CEA for advice.

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Postby chronoel » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:31 pm

Can you enlighten me on this eviction please..

Does this mean they will give us a notice period to leave..
And will we get our deposit back?

FYI. It's stated in the TA that the notice period is 12 months. Minimum stay of 3 months and it's just our second month. So I'm worried if we say we will leave they'll not return our deposit.

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Postby beppi » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:32 pm

If you are living together with your landlord in his apartment, obviously he's the boss and you better have a good relationship with him. Instead of thinking about whether he can disallow cooking (and preparing to fight over it), you could talk to him reasonably and try to find a mutually acceptable solution. You could for example offer to clean the kitchen every week, or cook a good meal for him every now and then.

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Postby chronoel » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:34 pm

Yeah, we tried that already. We said we'll only cook on weekends and we always clean after we cook.

But they don't want to settle.

They don't live in the house.

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Postby beppi » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:38 pm

Is your Tenancy Agreement properly stamped by the authorities (and did you pay the stamp fee for it)?
If not, you cannot enforce it legally (incl. return of the deposit) and depend on your landlord's goodwill. So, don't destroy that goodwill by fighting against him!

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JR8
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Postby JR8 » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:38 pm

I think you need to apply some common sense.

Do others cook? If yes, then it might be considered unreasonable if you are not allowed to. It is also confusing to suggest the gas supply is included in the rent, and then add, 'Oh but sorry, you can't use any'.

But rather than kicking off World War 3, why not discuss it with your flatmates? Do they cook? What do they think the situation means? It is likely the landlord simply uses a 'boiler-plate' agreement, i.e. the same for everybody.

If you have no satisfactory answer from your flatmates, then ask the landlord (via his agent) to confirm that some simple cooking (i.e. not vats of curry every day) 'now and again' (no need to be more specific) is permitted.


p.s. Further 2c: I have heard before that there is potentially an issue, between Indian tenants/sharers, and non-Indian landlords. The latter find the cooking smells challenging to deal with, and the heavy use of oils leaves a film over the kitchen cabinets etc., which is a hell of a job to clean off.

But if you understand what if any motives are causing this rather confused situation, then you will be prepared to find a solution or compromise that will keep everyone happy.

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nakatago
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Postby nakatago » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 7:52 pm

Moreover, the issue usually arises from people who can't clean up after themselves even if their lives depended on it.

If you can assure the landlord that you'll leave the kitchen in the same condition as when he had the kitchen fixtures installed, you're more likely to get him to agree.

How to convince him, however, is another matter.

The Indian tenants thing, I've heard from both agents AND owners is the the problem is the smell of the food permeates anything porous--usually wood--and stays there long after the tenant has moved out.

For any other race, grime build up on the stove, the hood, the walls, etc from frying is troublesome.

So, having slobs use your stuff can be quite...irritating and can't blame some people to impose an outright (although extreme) ban.

(On a personal note, I'm really ticked off by people who can't clean a microwave after their food splatters all over the interior or a toaster oven pan that has petrified food bits stuck on the pan :x )

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Postby iloverice » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 8:23 pm

My previous experience teach me to get the words - Cooking allowed - stated in the contract. Why? Because I stayed in a house before where me and the landlord have a verbal agreement on light cooking allowed, such as instant noodles, but on the end of the day it never happen, he simply told me that that one before I move in, he has the right to change his mind, no black n white, no complaint. What I do after that? I wait till the tenancy agreement expired, 6 mth contract, then I give him one month notice and move out. No arguement, because no mater what happen, it's still his house and I'm just a tenant.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 11 Mar 2013 8:51 pm

^^^ +1

Mi Amigo, see, I'm not the only one who thinks about those things. :wink:


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