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Discuss about life in Singapore. Ask about cost of living, housing, travel, etiquette & lifestyle. Share experience & advice with Singaporeans & expat staying in Singapore.
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iamsen
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Post by iamsen » Tue, 16 Apr 2013 5:41 am

JR8 wrote:That's ironic. Surely the Chinese are in SG (historically) because they 'couldn't make it in their own country'?
I use that against my family and friends everytime. 'It's different'. Like freak it is.

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JR8
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Post by JR8 » Tue, 16 Apr 2013 6:42 am

Exactly. Arrogant twits (many of them).

Indentured labour from China, brought down into Malaya, and now they think the land is their birth-right...


Yeah, that's funny! :lol:

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Post by Edroche » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 2:44 pm

JR8 wrote:
Edroche wrote:Found this article about visiting China to be v interesting. http://www.china-mike.com/chinese-cultu ... ut-groups/
Thanks for the link, that was a fascinating read, and it helps me understand something that I've been grappling with (unsuccessfully) for c25 odd years.
No probs. I found it could be applied to Singapore. I don't see much difference but thats just my observation.

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Post by Edroche » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 3:01 pm

zzm9980 wrote:
Edroche wrote:Found this article about visiting China to be v interesting. http://www.china-mike.com/chinese-cultu ... ut-groups/
This could explain the local forum trolls' fascinating assumption that every expat here is someone who 'couldn't make it' in their own country.
The local talents should walk into the next room and bring this issue up with their grandparents or even parents who come from a different country

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Post by gailwynand » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 8:24 am

I'll be sure to ask my mainland Chinese friends who are Western educated and speak better English than most of the locals if they moved to Singapore because they didn't want to learn English.

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Post by bgd » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 10:54 am

gailwynand wrote:I'll be sure to ask my mainland Chinese friends who are Western educated and speak better English than most of the locals if they moved to Singapore because they didn't want to learn English.
A PRC I know says his parents love visiting Sg because they don't need English. They of course are tourists.

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Post by zzm9980 » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 11:22 am

gailwynand wrote:I'll be sure to ask my mainland Chinese friends who are Western educated and speak better English than most of the locals if they moved to Singapore because they didn't want to learn English.
Their bilingual skills, western education, and connections at/to home will get them premium positions. These aren't the average Chinese university grads looking for PMET spots because they couldn't find any at home.

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Sooner8
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Post by Sooner8 » Sat, 04 May 2013 8:29 am

Interesting reading. Is this endemic to just the Chinese ethnicity or do other groups do similar and/or other stuff unique to their cultures?

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Post by morenangpinay » Tue, 28 May 2013 2:06 pm

Ii had another experience yesterday . Was waiting for a relative and there were 2 chinese locals sitting next to me and started talking bout foreigners being in Singapore and how these foreigners wouldn't be here if they were good.they would be in usa etc.. i think ive grown a thick skin coz it didnt bother me at all lol. It just made him strain himself because he talked louder an louder

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 28 May 2013 2:24 pm

Don't you just love it when that happens. :lol:

Yeah, they don't seem to be able to see the forest for the trees. They don't realize that most are here not because we couldn't make it at home, but because we WERE good and therefore other countries made offers we couldn't resist (along with the opportunity to see more of the world at the expense of somebody else - ;-) ). Unfortunately, they just show everybody around them exactly why they have to bring in foreign talent.
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by ScoobyDoes » Tue, 28 May 2013 2:33 pm

That and the fact they admit to themselves that Singapore itself is second rate whereby if anybody was any good they wouldn't even think of being here - 'Singapore only qualifies for the second or third tier employee.'

Of course we see that as not the case and yes, SMS, a lot get those offers that are too good to resist......that's the whole reason I moved to HK in the first place. That and the fact my dad kicked me out, telling me I would be stupid to stay at home (even 15yrs ago the political and social writing was on the wall). :lol:
'When Lewis Hamilton wins a race he has to thank Vodafone whereas in my day I used to chase the crumpet. I know which era I'd rather race in.'

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Post by morenangpinay » Wed, 29 May 2013 10:41 am

exactly i was laughing inside thinking they admit they are second rate. I am guessing if the locals had the chance they would migrate somewhere else.

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Post by sdkks » Sun, 09 Jun 2013 12:41 am

What I witnessed a few days ago was disturbing. There was this Australian guy who boarded MRT, his shirt had some sweat and he was standing next to a young Chinese lady. There was no other place to move, it was packed. From the start of journey, until he alighted, this lady held her nose with her hand, protecting herself from the smell. This guy noticed this but couldn't do anything though he was embarassed by her behaviour and people staring at him. I was behind both of them and smell wasn't so horrifying either. Was she really disturbed or was it a way to humiliate him I don't know.

I saw this a few times before this incident, too, even from boys. My wife said they do this when Indians hold the upper handles for support when travelling on train.

Even if I was disturbed, I wouldn't hold my nose and embarass someone like that, never, even to a hobo. I find this offensive, I don't know how is the local perception.

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Post by AngMoG » Sun, 09 Jun 2013 1:08 am

sdkks wrote: I saw this a few times before this incident, too, even from boys. My wife said they do this when Indians hold the upper handles for support when travelling on train.

Even if I was disturbed, I wouldn't hold my nose and embarass someone like that, never, even to a hobo. I find this offensive, I don't know how is the local perception.
I have to say I have understanding for holding your nose. If you don't, how will anyone ever notice they stink? So many subcontinentals here, and also white people, who seemingly have never heard of deodorant. Should make that a mandatory training, or HR policy, or similar ;)

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Post by nakatago » Sun, 09 Jun 2013 8:32 am

AngMoG wrote:
sdkks wrote: I saw this a few times before this incident, too, even from boys. My wife said they do this when Indians hold the upper handles for support when travelling on train.

Even if I was disturbed, I wouldn't hold my nose and embarass someone like that, never, even to a hobo. I find this offensive, I don't know how is the local perception.
I have to say I have understanding for holding your nose. If you don't, how will anyone ever notice they stink? So many subcontinentals here, and also white people, who seemingly have never heard of deodorant. Should make that a mandatory training, or HR policy, or similar ;)
I've been told a story of a fastfood manager threatening his subcontinental staff of being fired of he doesn't start showering before coming to work and using deodorant.
"A quokka is what would happen if there was an anime about kangaroos."

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