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A kaleidoscope of accents

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JR8
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A kaleidoscope of accents

Postby JR8 » Fri, 25 Jan 2013 10:34 pm

I was just out earlier today and I saw this decidedly queer looking young fellow of a most unusual hue. For reasons yet to be divined I found myself thinking in a patois, in the style of 'Little Britain':


'Ere, it looks like he's been f****** Tango'd or summing!!!'


[Tango being a repulsive orangade drink that reputedly does turn you orange if you drink it in industrial quantities. Like Donatella 'Officially orange' Versace]

Having an interest in languages and accents, a linguistic bent if you will, I was wondering whether others might like to share any linguistic differences/nuances/idiosyncrasies from their own country/region.

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Postby nakatago » Fri, 25 Jan 2013 10:49 pm


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Postby JR8 » Sat, 26 Jan 2013 12:33 am

---------------------------------------------------
'Code-switching

Taglish and Englog are portmanteaus given to a mix of English and Tagalog. The amount of English vs. Tagalog varies from the occasional use of English loan words to outright code-switching where the language changes in mid-sentence. Such code-switching is prevalent throughout the Philippines and in various of the languages of the Philippines other than Tagalog.

Code Mixing also entails the use of foreign words that are Filipinized by reforming them using Filipino rules, such as verb conjugations. Users typically use Filipino or English words, whichever comes to mind first or whichever is easier to use.
Magshoshopping kami sa mall. Sino ba ang magdadrive sa shopping center?
"We will go shopping at the mall. Who will drive to the shopping center?"

Although it is generally looked down upon, code-switching is prevalent in all levels of society; however, city-dwellers, the highly educated, and people born around and after World War II are more likely to do it.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tagalog_la ... sification

Hmmmm.... very interesting. I've always thought of code-switching as rapidly adopting an accent to empathise/connect with the natives (i.e. go on holiday to Florida and come home speaking like a yank ;)).

Same way that in Singapore you suddenly realise one day you're slipping in a 'lah', 'so how ah!?', or 'waaah, cannot leh!' here and there :)

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Postby nakatago » Sat, 26 Jan 2013 1:13 am

JR8 wrote:---------------------------------------------------
'Code-switching

Taglish and Englog are portmanteaus given to a mix of English and Tagalog. The amount of English vs. Tagalog varies from the occasional use of English loan words to outright code-switching where the language changes in mid-sentence. Such code-switching is prevalent throughout the Philippines and in various of the languages of the Philippines other than Tagalog.

Code Mixing also entails the use of foreign words that are Filipinized by reforming them using Filipino rules, such as verb conjugations. Users typically use Filipino or English words, whichever comes to mind first or whichever is easier to use.
Magshoshopping kami sa mall. Sino ba ang magdadrive sa shopping center?
"We will go shopping at the mall. Who will drive to the shopping center?"

Although it is generally looked down upon, code-switching is prevalent in all levels of society; however, city-dwellers, the highly educated, and people born around and after World War II are more likely to do it.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tagalog_la ... sification

Hmmmm.... very interesting. I've always thought of code-switching as rapidly adopting an accent to empathise/connect with the natives (i.e. go on holiday to Florida and come home speaking like a yank ;)).

Same way that in Singapore you suddenly realise one day you're slipping in a 'lah', 'so how ah!?', or 'waaah, cannot leh!' here and there :)


Some people find it really entertaining when I do an Irish, French or Ozzie accent.

Of course, all it's good for is a cheap party trick and offending any Irish, French or Ozzie who can inadvertently hear me.

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Postby JR8 » Sat, 26 Jan 2013 3:59 am

nakatago wrote:Some people find it really entertaining when I do an Irish, French or Ozzie accent.

Of course, all it's good for is a cheap party trick and offending any Irish, French or Ozzie who can inadvertently hear me.



Yah.




No.





I'd pay to hear an accent.


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