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Fogging

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wheaten
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Fogging

Postby wheaten » Wed, 16 Jan 2013 1:56 pm

I got caught in fogging yesterday. I came home and showered, but was clueless as to what I should have done. During and after the event. Does anyone know what the safeguards are if I get caught out again?
The Australian government traveller warning page for Singapore actually warns about the toxicity of fogging.

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the lynx
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Re: Fogging

Postby the lynx » Wed, 16 Jan 2013 2:11 pm

wheaten wrote:I got caught in fogging yesterday. I came home and showered, but was clueless as to what I should have done. During and after the event. Does anyone know what the safeguards are if I get caught out again?
The Australian government traveller warning page for Singapore actually warns about the toxicity of fogging.


Just stay away from the smoke. That's the best way.

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Postby wheaten » Wed, 16 Jan 2013 2:26 pm

This was an unexpected fogging at a time and place I have been to repeatedly. I can only assume I will get caught out, or a loved one will, and would like to know the correct procedures.

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x9200
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Postby x9200 » Wed, 16 Jan 2013 3:26 pm

Are you serious? What do you expect, they are fogging with Sarin or something?

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 16 Jan 2013 5:34 pm

Other than the odours and possible residual moisture that would lingers on your clothes, there's little to worry about as the concentrations are minute regarding minor contact with the insecticide contained therein. Obviously, though, if you make your living with on of them day in and day out, the concentrations over a period of time "may" accumulate to a level to be checked out. In fact, while prolonged exposure to the fumes can cause some problems, NEA requires ALL Vector Control Personnel to have 6 monthly blood tests just to ensure no build up. IN the 8 years I've been in the industry with over 180 guys in the field every day, we've never had a case of buildup. Of course when you guys are working 44 hours or more a week, they do wear masks for safety purposes, but you really need not worry about the occasional exposure to fogging. Australia are overly paranoid. Wait till you fly home on one of their planes and they start walking down the aisle fogging the plane (been there seen that).

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Postby wheaten » Wed, 16 Jan 2013 9:15 pm

Yes, I really was serious. My paranoia was not overly helped by hearing a podcast recently about the incidence of Parkinson's in Australian farmers who had been exposed to chemicals and then to add the warning that arrived the next day in my in box from the Australian government, well that was the tipping point that sent me here to ask the question. I quite like the post giving me reasons not to panic and appreciate all Who have taken the time to help answer my question. I emailed the NEA to ask them what they recommend earlier today. If I get a response, I will paste it here for anyone else who is interested.

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Postby x9200 » Wed, 16 Jan 2013 10:22 pm

But... just using some common sense would you really expect they were allowed to carry out the fogging the way they do if it would be any risk to the public or direct inhabitants?

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Postby Mi Amigo » Thu, 17 Jan 2013 12:30 am

The risk of a dengue epidemic would be much greater if they were to stop fogging. I don't particularly like the smoke either but I accept it as a necessary measure to keep the mozzies at bay. It didn't take me long to learn to 'tune in' to the sound of an approaching fogger and take the appropriate actions to minimise any direct exposure.
Be careful what you wish for

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JR8
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Postby JR8 » Thu, 17 Jan 2013 1:24 am

If you're outside, then simply move out of the way.

If you're indoors and the fog comes in through open windows, then breath through a wet flannel, towel or similar for a minute or two until it passes.

No big deal; it's that simple.

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Postby snowqueen » Sat, 19 Jan 2013 9:09 am

If this is happening at your condo, they usually have an exact day and time that they would be doing this. For us it's 10am on a Thursday (unless it's raining then they come back the next day).

If I was by the pool I move out the way until the fog had passed then come back. I'm now in a ground floor apartment so have to make sure everything is closed - the smell lingers a bit from the bin shute but only for an hour or so.

We have a lot of construction in our area at the moment and about to have the 2nd NEA Dengue visit within a 6 month period, last time this happened they conducted a 2nd fogging each week for a period of 2 months just to be sure.

I would rather get out the way of fogging for half an hour than get sick from Dengue.

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Postby wheaten » Wed, 23 Jan 2013 8:12 am

I was out walking at night and between getting caught up in a conversation, ignorance and darkness , didn't realise what I was walking into till it was too late! Mind you, it was the time of night I usually walk and it had never happened before, so I was not thinking about the possibility.
It then happened the next night, so I knew, turned around and went somewhere else. But it hasn't happened again. My concern is what to do should I or the kids get caught up in this sort of situation again. On fogging day at home, I remember to close the windows etc. I appreciate not being bitten by mosquitoes and so have never said I wanted fogging ( great euphemism ) to end, rather I am after some advice for after the event. Our area has had no reported dengue outbreaks , so it seems the fogging is successful and for that I am grateful.

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Postby offshoreoildude » Wed, 23 Jan 2013 8:40 am

The oil in fogging is similar to the active ingredients in Mortein - Allethrin.
Quite low toxicity. The carrying agent (oil) is probably more toxic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allethrin
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Postby the lynx » Wed, 23 Jan 2013 9:07 am

offshoreoildude wrote:The oil in fogging is similar to the active ingredients in Mortein - Allethrin.
Quite low toxicity. The carrying agent (oil) is probably more toxic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allethrin


All fogging solution allowed in Singapore are pyrethroid-based (basically if you look at the active ingredient on label, it has -thrin suffix at the back; like allethrin in this case). Supposed to be the least harmful form of insecticide to be released in air, compared to others like malathion (a staple for gardeners or landscaping enthusiasts) or fipronil (you will find in your cockroach bait in supermarkets).

Usually mixed with kerosene/diesel for fogging. As for the effect of kerosene/diesel in droplet form on human health, I'm not sure actually.


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