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What are the factors contributing to PR Approval?

Relocating, travelling or planning to make Singapore home? Discuss the criterias, passes or visa that is required.
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proxymoron
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Postby proxymoron » Fri, 11 Jan 2013 4:25 pm

@vestapo
To be honest, most non-indian companies here would hire indian people without graduation / masters. Provided you know your trade and have the communication skills to project it properly. And as mentioned in these forums many times, the "masters" from India hold not much weightage partly due to its abundance and partly coz of the shady nature of the universities.

I myself am an Indian who dont have a Degree (or masters):oops: , who got PR in 2010, just 18th months after landing here. And I was on P2 employement pass. I expected rejection, but still went ahead with the application. Now, I am really glad I did that.

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Postby FaeLLe » Sat, 02 Feb 2013 10:18 pm

beppi wrote:You forgot what SMS usually calls "collateral damage" - the number of family members the applicant has and could possibly bring to Singapore as dependants (they count in his disfavour!).
And the ability to produce offspring (preferably male, as "cannon fodder" for the army) is a big plus.


Just curious how it would work out if someone had LTVP for their parents while applying for PR, of course the PR application form would clearly indicate that parents are NOT included in application (there is an option to do so).

Occupation of father would be CEO of a company based overseas, approx annual revenue of 2-5 million per annum (of course there is no way to indicate this to ICA).

How would this play out.... recommended to cancel LTVP of parents before PR application? Or let the LTVP be valid but clearly indicate that they are not part of PR application.

Appreciate your thoughts...

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Postby x9200 » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 10:25 am

If ICA sees your parents as potentially positively contributing to Singapore economy and society they would probably be seen as an asset in your PR applications. Of course such situations are rather rare but all this is about what Singapore can get and lose granting you PR or other privileges.
Canceling LTVP, I don't think it would have any positive impact. You have to supply the list of your extended family members anyway so they may just wonder why did you do this.
BTW, this sounds a bit strange to me to be a CEO of an overseas company and stay here on LTVP.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 11:18 am

x9200 wrote:BTW, this sounds a bit strange to me to be a CEO of an overseas company and stay here on LTVP.


It's what has gotten them into the crap in most countries today. That "always looking for a way to scam the hosts" mentality.

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Postby Greenry82 » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 12:56 pm

Family ties / volunteer work may also play a small part...

but race will remain the major part we can see now a days MC are the lucky ones.


SMS & other experts - MC are the best flavours, Indians are the least desirable flavours (due to demographic changes lately) what I understand as per ICA point of views on this forum. How about uncommon nationalities/races like South Africa, Iran, Nepal, Turkey, Brunei?

Do they have better chances since they have very little popolation here?

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Postby FaeLLe » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 1:51 pm

x9200 wrote:BTW, this sounds a bit strange to me to be a CEO of an overseas company and stay here on LTVP.


Its all about effective delegation, physical presence is hardly required.

Even in my company we run global projects and operations through just conference calls and a very very lean team on the ground at very specific times.

Most of the supplier and customer management can be done by calls and accounting and audit activities are done remotely by logging in through VPN and Remote Desktops.

You just need people to be there to manage inventory and coordinate factory workers etc.; a good Manager i.e. his Son can get that done.

Also the company is HQ in a region where there are no corporate taxes (yes there are still such countries) and Singapore does not tax you on foreign income so no need to pay taxes here either.

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Postby FaeLLe » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 1:52 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:
x9200 wrote:BTW, this sounds a bit strange to me to be a CEO of an overseas company and stay here on LTVP.


It's what has gotten them into the crap in most countries today. That "always looking for a way to scam the hosts" mentality.


Not sure what that means SMS but countries are happy if you grow the economy but do not mandate you to stay there.

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Postby Wd40 » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 4:15 pm

FaeLLe wrote:
beppi wrote:You forgot what SMS usually calls "collateral damage" - the number of family members the applicant has and could possibly bring to Singapore as dependants (they count in his disfavour!).
And the ability to produce offspring (preferably male, as "cannon fodder" for the army) is a big plus.


Just curious how it would work out if someone had LTVP for their parents while applying for PR, of course the PR application form would clearly indicate that parents are NOT included in application (there is an option to do so).

Occupation of father would be CEO of a company based overseas, approx annual revenue of 2-5 million per annum (of course there is no way to indicate this to ICA).

How would this play out.... recommended to cancel LTVP of parents before PR application? Or let the LTVP be valid but clearly indicate that they are not part of PR application.

Appreciate your thoughts...


Dude, including parents in PR application is NOT an option. I thought this was very obvious stuff considering you have been in this country and this forum for so long and even more surprising is the other seniors posters haven't mentioned this to you yet. Parents are a consider as a burden here and at best it is only ltsvp that you can get, no DP, no PR. The fact the parent is CEO means nothing. it's neutral to negative in terms of impact on your PR application.

BTW, now I am able to connect the dots. Rich Father CEO of a company living with son on ltsvp. Son with avg salary yet buys a 3 bedroom condo here.

See how I guessed correctly in the other post that to buy a condo here on 6k salary you need to have a rich dad or dad in law :)

I am sure many Indians like you are living here and flaunting their property buys.

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Postby FaeLLe » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 4:36 pm

Including parents in PR option was never an option, in fact it was clearly mentioned that I would indicate they are not part of the application (there is a column in the form to indicate this.

Actually the deposit for my condo was the result of gains from my financial instruments / commodity yields that were invested with Citigold Singapore.

Made some quick wins on my bonuses and it was all locally generated income for which I paid taxes to IRAS, not remittances from my Rich father...

But yea I agree the status of my father probably does not mean much in a PR application and probably could be negative which is why I was seeking thoughts on cancellation of LTVP..

Wd40 wrote:
FaeLLe wrote:
beppi wrote:You forgot what SMS usually calls "collateral damage" - the number of family members the applicant has and could possibly bring to Singapore as dependants (they count in his disfavour!).
And the ability to produce offspring (preferably male, as "cannon fodder" for the army) is a big plus.


Just curious how it would work out if someone had LTVP for their parents while applying for PR, of course the PR application form would clearly indicate that parents are NOT included in application (there is an option to do so).

Occupation of father would be CEO of a company based overseas, approx annual revenue of 2-5 million per annum (of course there is no way to indicate this to ICA).

How would this play out.... recommended to cancel LTVP of parents before PR application? Or let the LTVP be valid but clearly indicate that they are not part of PR application.

Appreciate your thoughts...


Dude, including parents in PR application is NOT an option. I thought this was very obvious stuff considering you have been in this country and this forum for so long and even more surprising is the other seniors posters haven't mentioned this to you yet. Parents are a consider as a burden here and at best it is only ltsvp that you can get, no DP, no PR. The fact the parent is CEO means nothing. it's neutral to negative in terms of impact on your PR application.

BTW, now I am able to connect the dots. Rich Father CEO of a company living with son on ltsvp. Son with avg salary yet buys a 3 bedroom condo here.

See how I guessed correctly in the other post that to buy a condo here on 6k salary you need to have a rich dad or dad in law :)

I am sure many Indians like you are living here and flaunting their property buys.

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Postby Wd40 » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 4:44 pm

Haha, when there is no option to include parents why or how do you indicate that parents are not included in the application? :lol:

The column in the form is for spouse and children.

It's not just about the source of funds. It's about your risk taking ability. If my dad was a CEO like you, the moment I stepped in this country I would have bought a condo by taking personal loans for 5-6 banks for the down payment like some of my friends did :)

I don't know whether canceling ltsvp will have any impact. I don't think anybody on this forum knows. It may well appear as a "stunt" to the ICA. Who knows.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 03 Feb 2013 6:12 pm

I can assure you that anything that can, even remotely, look negative, WILL be looked at that way by immigration. You must remember that their primary directive is to weed them out, not find reasons to let them in. Until that is no longer a primary directive, you are gong to just have to look at the worst case scenario.

See, abusers make it harder for all those who follow. The fact that Singaporeans are Kiasu, doesn't mean all are, but that a significant number of them are. Same goes with PR abusers from the Subcontinent. Not all are but a sufficient number were so now the who continent gets tarred with the same brush.

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Postby LongTimeHere » Thu, 07 Feb 2013 1:57 pm

Buddy the simple answer is ... nobody knows. There is no defined criteria other than what is mentioned on the ICA website which is not much.

Most people talk from 'experience'. To quantify that even if somebody knows about 1000 cases then that is less than 1% of the total PR's granted in the last decade.

So put in your facts, only facts in your application - if ICA calls you for clarification and you fumble then may God be with you.

Above all know the responsibilities that come with being a PR, make sure you fully understand the NS obligations, make sure you are willing to embrace this country and be with Singaporeans , then submit and hope for the best.

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Postby FaeLLe » Thu, 07 Feb 2013 3:52 pm

Love the idea of NS, think it toughens the hell out of individuals :)

But the best time to do it is after getting out of college and before you start working...

Only thing is I have no clue how I / someone would continue paying their home / car loans off if they got into Full Time NS in the middle of their career.


LongTimeHere wrote:Buddy the simple answer is ... nobody knows. There is no defined criteria other than what is mentioned on the ICA website which is not much.

Most people talk from 'experience'. To quantify that even if somebody knows about 1000 cases then that is less than 1% of the total PR's granted in the last decade.

So put in your facts, only facts in your application - if ICA calls you for clarification and you fumble then may God be with you.

Above all know the responsibilities that come with being a PR, make sure you fully understand the NS obligations, make sure you are willing to embrace this country and be with Singaporeans , then submit and hope for the best.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 07 Feb 2013 5:35 pm

Actually the best time to do NS is before you start university as it's only a max of 24 months but if you are fit, maybe 21 months. Starting after University will put you at a disadvantage as the knowledge retention of most graduates here in Singapore is only around 6 months as they only cram for tests and rarely retain any knowledge much longer than that unless they have a job where they get into that actually causes them to have to use some of the knowledge.

If you wait till after university to do NS, by the time time finish NS they will have to go back to university for a least a year to relearn all that was forgotten by the time they finished their BMT.

As to NS in Singapore toughening up individuals, I'm of mixed emotions, there. Yeah, physically it does, but I though is would also help in other areas as well, but looking at my sons past 1.5 years, I don't see much change outside of the physical.


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