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Singapore most emotionless society in the world

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x9200
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Postby x9200 » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 12:46 pm

zzm9980 wrote:The article is light on details, but I think they were going for the more the 'traditional' range of emotions, (like happy or sad), not passive aggression :P

Anyway, I did a little digging (ok, one Google search) and found the question is actually about discussing said emotions:

http://www.gallup.com/poll/158882/singa ... world.aspx

Being emotional and discussing said emotions are different things obviously. I recall some threads here talking about the lack of emotional depth in many people in Singapore. I've witnessed it too, and to me the survey makes sense. I'm not saying everyone either, but I can distinctly make out a large subset of the populace who act blur not just to their surroundings, but in conversations or interactions where you normally expect some kind of feeling.


But all this mean only they do not express their certain emotions openly, and not that they are with no emotions.
You show an average group of Westerners and SGrs some stupid movie like Bean (or even something local right from Ch 5) and observe their reactions. Now I bet SGrs will laugh/smile much more frequently and Westerners may not even smile so does it prove that SGrs are more emotional? I think this survey is fundamentally wrong either with its basic methodology or with the word phrasing and conclusions.

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Postby the lynx » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 1:27 pm

Kept re-reading the article, not sure what was their actual methodology but I wouldn't say that I agree to the results.

Emotionless? I do not think so. Look at all the drama queens and kings on the comment section of the news portal.

I would say yes to lack of empathy and graciousness though; those are indeed rare among the locals.

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Postby Callput » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 1:39 pm

x9200 wrote:
zzm9980 wrote:The article is light on details, but I think they were going for the more the 'traditional' range of emotions, (like happy or sad), not passive aggression :P

Anyway, I did a little digging (ok, one Google search) and found the question is actually about discussing said emotions:

http://www.gallup.com/poll/158882/singa ... world.aspx

Being emotional and discussing said emotions are different things obviously. I recall some threads here talking about the lack of emotional depth in many people in Singapore. I've witnessed it too, and to me the survey makes sense. I'm not saying everyone either, but I can distinctly make out a large subset of the populace who act blur not just to their surroundings, but in conversations or interactions where you normally expect some kind of feeling.


But all this mean only they do not express their certain emotions openly, and not that they are with no emotions.
You show an average group of Westerners and SGrs some stupid movie like Bean (or even something local right from Ch 5) and observe their reactions. Now I bet SGrs will laugh/smile much more frequently and Westerners may not even smile so does it prove that SGrs are more emotional? I think this survey is fundamentally wrong either with its basic methodology or with the word phrasing and conclusions.


+1

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Postby morenangpinay » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 3:34 pm

A poll of more than 150 nations conducted via telephone and in-person of about 1,000 people ages 15 and older in each country every year between 2009 and 2011 asked participants whether they had five positive and five negative emotions a lot the day before. The negative emotions include anger, stress, sadness, physical pain, and worry, and the positive emotions include feeling well-rested, being treated with respect, enjoyment, smiling and laughing a lot, and learning or doing something interesting.

Read more at http://www.medicaldaily.com/articles/13 ... t5klWxr.99

looks like singaporeans dont experience the negative and positive range.it didnt say there is no emotion, just least emotional. maybe stunted eq

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Postby Mi Amigo » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 3:55 pm

Some very good points raised in this thread. Perhaps I was being too cynical (moi??) in my comments about the local rags and maybe instead I should be applauding them for at least having the courage to run an article like this, flawed though the underlying info may be? I like the comment about watching a Mr Bean film. We're always amazed at the way cinema audiences here laugh so much at anything even slightly humorous. So there is obviously some emotion there under the skin. I think Lynx hit the nail on the head TBH.

the lynx wrote:Kept re-reading the article, not sure what was their actual methodology but I wouldn't say that I agree to the results.

Emotionless? I do not think so. Look at all the drama queens and kings on the comment section of the news portal.

I would say yes to lack of empathy and graciousness though; those are indeed rare among the locals.
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Postby movingtospore » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 4:07 pm

Perhaps Gallup missed the point that S'poreans just say no when a question makes them uncomfortable, or when they don't know they answer, I think. So perhaps what it really shows is that a bunch of people got cold calls asking about there emotions and said no, no, no, no, yes, no, good bye.

Seriously.

I won't defend them about many things but one this I will!

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Postby the lynx » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 4:08 pm

Mi Amigo wrote:Some very good points raised in this thread. Perhaps I was being too cynical (moi??) in my comments about the local rags and maybe instead I should be applauding them for running this article? I like the comment about watching a Mr Bean film. We're always amazed at the way cinema audiences here laugh so much at anything even slightly humorous. So there is obviously some emotion there under the skin. I think Lynx hit the nail on the head TBH.

the lynx wrote:Kept re-reading the article, not sure what was their actual methodology but I wouldn't say that I agree to the results.

Emotionless? I do not think so. Look at all the drama queens and kings on the comment section of the news portal.

I would say yes to lack of empathy and graciousness though; those are indeed rare among the locals.


To add, my regular social interaction involves large groups of Singaporeans, young and old and I do not think that they are unable to express emotions; they function pretty fine actually.

And if you look at their Facebook, Twitter and Weibo, you will be amused by the ridiculous amount of exaggerated expressions for every damn thing, even their chicken rice (ZOMG! LMFAO! WTF! etc). And knowing how 'soft and domesticated' some of them are, what makes you think it won't be easy for them to break down under little stress?

Now, on acting 'blur like sotong' bit, that is just a mode of self-defence and doesn't reflect anything about being emotional. That's why I go back to my point that it is their lack of empathy and graciousness that is the problem.

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Postby v4jr4 » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 4:12 pm

I'll add STOMP for reference :lol:
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Postby zzm9980 » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 5:00 pm

the lynx wrote:And if you look at their Facebook, Twitter and Weibo,


Interesting point. Maybe it comes down to inability/unwillingness to be honest about the polled emotions with strangers? While you can argue people 'online' are strangers, many people would consider their friends/followers on said social networks to be their friends, and not realize they are strangers (until they insult a Malaysian wedding and half the island knows in an hour...)

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 22 Nov 2012 5:20 pm

:lol:

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Postby SV1231 » Fri, 23 Nov 2012 3:22 pm

zzm9980 wrote:The article is light on details, but I think they were going for the more the 'traditional' range of emotions, (like happy or sad), not passive aggression :P

You show an average group of Westerners and SGrs some stupid movie like Bean (or even something local right from Ch 5) and observe their reactions. Now I bet SGrs will laugh/smile much more frequently and Westerners may not even smile so does it prove that SGrs are more emotional? I think this survey is fundamentally wrong either with its basic methodology or with the word phrasing and conclusions.


It is tragic that you call the survey fundamentally wrong & to prove your point provide such fundamentally flawed explanation like "show an average group of Westerners and SGrs some stupid movie like Bean".. May I ask, who will define ‘Average’, 'Stupid' or westerners for that matter (some people may think westerners to be Caucasians only).. so you see it is very subjective & prone to bias... you are within your right to accept/ reject the findings.. but please do that for the right reason.. No point in guessing that I can vouch for this particular study & the data crunching that went into this.. Most people when we tell them what’s wrong with their team/department/country/Region/world starts with a denial .. & questioning the metrics or the methodology.. Usually the solutioning does not start until the acknowledgement..
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Postby SV1231 » Fri, 23 Nov 2012 3:26 pm

movingtospore wrote:Perhaps Gallup missed the point that S'poreans just say no when a question makes them uncomfortable, or when they don't know they answer, I think. So perhaps what it really shows is that a bunch of people got cold calls asking about there emotions and said no, no, no, no, yes, no, good bye.

Seriously.

I won't defend them about many things but one this I will!


Mr Expert,
No it did not happen like that.
By the way, did it occur to you that your observation is a comment (sad) on the intellectual grasp of Singaporeans ..
Looks like you will have to hypothesize a bit more .. too bad :(
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Postby Mi Amigo » Fri, 23 Nov 2012 3:49 pm

SV1231, I'm trying to understand your first post above. Did you really mean:

SV1231 wrote:No point in guessing that I can vouch for this particular study & the data crunching that went into this.

... or did you actually mean to have some additional punctuation, viz...

No point in guessing that. I can vouch for this particular study & the data crunching that went into this.

Obviously the meaning is different in each case.

From your second post...

SV1231 wrote:No it did not happen like that.

... it seems that perhaps you did have some involvement in the survey. Care to enlighten us further?
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Postby x9200 » Fri, 23 Nov 2012 6:30 pm

SV1231, if you want to have by any chance a reasonable discussion on the points raised you are encouraged to quote properly and write the way people could comprehend and would be willing to respond with some arguments. Calm down, think over your approach inclusive of handling public relation matters and come back if you really want to discuss the survey.

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Postby the lynx » Sat, 24 Nov 2012 12:03 am

SV1231 wrote:
zzm9980 wrote:The article is light on details, but I think they were going for the more the 'traditional' range of emotions, (like happy or sad), not passive aggression :P

You show an average group of Westerners and SGrs some stupid movie like Bean (or even something local right from Ch 5) and observe their reactions. Now I bet SGrs will laugh/smile much more frequently and Westerners may not even smile so does it prove that SGrs are more emotional? I think this survey is fundamentally wrong either with its basic methodology or with the word phrasing and conclusions.


It is tragic that you call the survey fundamentally wrong & to prove your point provide such fundamentally flawed explanation like "show an average group of Westerners and SGrs some stupid movie like Bean".. May I ask, who will define ‘Average’, 'Stupid' or westerners for that matter (some people may think westerners to be Caucasians only).. so you see it is very subjective & prone to bias... you are within your right to accept/ reject the findings.. but please do that for the right reason.. No point in guessing that I can vouch for this particular study & the data crunching that went into this.. Most people when we tell them what’s wrong with their team/department/country/Region/world starts with a denial .. & questioning the metrics or the methodology.. Usually the solutioning does not start until the acknowledgement..


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