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Questions To Ask In Interviews

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Questions To Ask In Interviews

Postby c a r e e r » Wed, 15 Dec 2004 8:52 pm

[align=center]Questions to ask in interviews

by Scott Boyd[/align]




OK, so you filled out the application form, got through all the testing and answered all their questions easily. Now your faced with your greatest challenge!

The dreaded question, "is there anything you would like to ask us?". DOH! You know you can't just say "no, I'm fine" and walk away.

This is your final test - all the rest was just a warm up - this is the big game!

Most of the questions to ask, below, would naturally have to be tailored for each position applied for (I can't hold your hand all the way through your application process - you're just going to have to learn to stand on your own two feet!).

What scope for promotion and upward progress is there within this company?

This shows that you are both keen and are making long term plans to remain with the company.

Is the company planning any expansions or developments that might lead to further career opportunities?

This shows that you are taking an interest in the company, and again that you are making long term plans to remain with them.

I am keen to further develop my skills and experience. What sort of scope is there to do this within your company?

Employers will value potential as much as existing skills and experience. You will be perceived to be more valuable to them if they think your skills and knowledge will continuingly grow. Also, most employers will have some sort of training or staff facilities in place, so it's always good to let them know they're not wasting their money!

Relate to your past experience.

For example, if you found a previous job not to be challenging enough, then say so at your interview.

Ask your potential employer how they will challenge you!

Note: If you tell them that you found your previous job dull and boring, but you are applying for the same role in a different company, then the chances are that you won't get the job!

Relate to what they have been telling you at the interview.

If you bring something up that they have mentioned to before, it shows that you have been listening (which is the least that they can expect from you after all!).

Say something along the lines of, "You said before that you are expanding into the music business. I have a particular interest in the music industry, so would it be possible, nearer the time, for me to participate in this?".

Relate to the industry.

Read up on the industry that your potential employer works in.

If there have been notable developments recently, then bring them up (ask what impact the developments had on their business).



Good luck!
Regards Scott Boyd - Webmaster and Founder - Jobseekers Advice




Written by Scott Boyd, Founder of www.jobseekersadvice.com
Free Career Advice for jobseekers

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Postby Strong Eagle » Wed, 15 Dec 2004 10:21 pm

I suppose that those are a decent set of questions, and probably ought to be asked during an interview. However, the problem is that all those questions are "me" focused... what are MY long term opportunities, what are MY opportunities for education and growth.

No, the questions I like to hear go something like this:

What sorts of problems would you be hiring me to solve?

If you hire me, what areas could I make the biggest contribution?

Will I be given the opportunity to manage the costs of doing my job?

Would you be open to doing things differently if I could show you a more cost effective way of doing things that doesn't increase risk?

Will I be able to learn all about the company, its strategies, its goals?

See, when I hear a candidate ask these kind of questions, it makes me believe that he/she is more concerned about what they can do for the company as opposed to what the company can do for them.

Most people ask about benefits, training, and career opportunities. It is the rare individual that asks how he/she can benefit the company, and that sir, is what differentiates the person from the rest of the flock.

Cheers.

Disagree

Re: Questions To Ask In Interviews

Postby Disagree » Fri, 17 Dec 2004 12:56 pm

I am quite disagree with Scott's question. Given the economics evironment, Job seeker has to understand the interviewer and it company position rather than pushing your luck by prompting question that in turns, the interviewer will think otherwise.

What scope for promotion and upward progress is there within this company?

- For the past 3 years, Singapore has been going through retrenchment and companies are barely surviving. By prompting this question will lead to the interviewer thinks that you only interested in promotion within certain time frame. Interviewer will brand you as one of those will resign if you did not get the promotion and upward progression you are seeking for.

Is the company planning any expansions or developments that might lead to further career opportunities?

Again, this shows that you will not interested to help the company if they are doing badly and only interested for big and progressive one.

I am keen to further develop my skills and experience. What sort of scope is there to do this within your company?

Nowadays, no employer will value your sense for continue improvement. Too ambitious will scared your boss away as the interviewer will think that you wont spend enough time performing OT but rather than seeking outside courses if the company does not provide one.


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