Do it yourself?

Discuss about life in Singapore. Ask about cost of living, housing, travel, etiquette & lifestyle. Share experience & advice with Singaporeans & expat staying in Singapore.
Post Reply
User avatar
the lynx
Governor
Governor
Posts: 5274
Joined: Thu, 09 Dec 2010 6:29 pm
Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location:

Post by the lynx » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 12:11 am

My God! And now the topic has gone from the McGyver DIY to steamy DIY
:P

That's so so typical of Friday posts... :lol:

x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9869
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009 4:06 pm
Location: Singapore

Post by x9200 » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 8:11 am

So getting back to the initial topic I completely agree with what was said earlier - if you have some basic DIY skills then DIY. It will be:
1. Much cheaper
2. Of better quality
3. Faster and less troublesome

I have never encountered any local, standard contractor with the quality I was satisfied with. They don't care whether they put something tilted (i.e. a water tap), or dirty with glue, or with loose screws, or with different colors and finish than everything around (bathrooms tiles, parquet varnishing). Average service quality in Singapore is bad to very bad, why it should be any better when it comes to the handyman and contractors work?

Of course I will not touch gas related things and typically I give up on integrated electronics (except computers) and major plumbing but the rest I pretty much try to fix by myself.

revhappy
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1067
Joined: Wed, 10 Jun 2009 9:16 pm

Post by revhappy » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 8:46 am

..
Last edited by revhappy on Sun, 14 Oct 2012 11:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

sensei_
Chatter
Chatter
Posts: 232
Joined: Sun, 31 Jul 2011 12:11 pm
Location: Perth, Australia

Post by sensei_ » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 10:17 am

singaporeans are generally useless when it comes to DIY. my cousin couldnt even put together a ikea furniture if his life dependent on it.

and most singaporeans dont even own any tools. so the culture is pretty much dead, not to mention, what do you expect from singaporeans if they are using crap tools. even the workshop where i work uses diamond brand spanners and box sockets. elsewhere, the minimum would be something like bahco, or stahlwille. not some monkey ching chong brand

on the other hand, my cousin was surprised to see that i had an engine crane, multiple full set of tools (sockets, breaker bar, torque, screwdrivers, etc), and all sorts of electrical tools to fix almost anything under my roof and my set of wheels.

to date i currently have something like ~300 hammers, ~1000 screwdrivers, ~50 planers, and a few chain blocks. the next container im sending to singapore, i am intending on sending some of those tools for my uncle's workshop so that he can actually learn some DIY.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 39562
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 1:26 pm
Answers: 10
Location: Retired on the Little Red Dot

Post by sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 10:20 am

I grew up on a farm. Anything, also can. Rebuild automotive engines, restore complete automobiles/bikes, automotive spray painting, Cabinet Maker, Carpenter, Roofer, Boat builder/refinisher, plumber, electrician, welding, concreting, fiberglass layup (haven't actually done any masonry or tiling though). Not too much I can't do, when it come to working with my hands. Had a full workshop when I lived in Seletar Camp, but had to sell all the major tools when I moved into HDB (things like a table saw, heavy duty router, belt sander, drill press, welding machine, etc.) Only kept pad sander, electric drill, jigsaw, dremel tool and reasonable quantities of hand tools.

Locked bedroom doors are not a problem at all and no need to use a hammer on them.
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9869
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009 4:06 pm
Location: Singapore

Post by x9200 » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 10:54 am

Yeah, but this is pretty much the opposite pole and it should not be expected everybody could do this. What should be is more over this line:
- fix seals/orings/washers
- be able to hang a lamp on the ceiling (and of course replace bulbs)
- change locks
- change bulbs in the car (with standard access)
- change tires (wheels) in the car
...

x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9869
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009 4:06 pm
Location: Singapore

Post by x9200 » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 11:01 am

I expect somebody may raise a valid point, why people that are far from the edge of poverty should be bothered and waste their precious time doing all these low qualification work that someone else can do for few peanuts (from their perspective). The answer in my case is: because I know I will do it better (at least in SG), faster and I don't mind doing it. All to all it saves me a lot of troubles.

revhappy
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1067
Joined: Wed, 10 Jun 2009 9:16 pm

Post by revhappy » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 11:39 am

Has anyone DIY cleaned the AC? I don't need to clean the large thing that is outside the window, but just clean the unit on the wall.

I noticed last house when we called the AC servicing they didn't do much, just dismantled it and washed it with vacuum cleaner and water were the only tools they used and they charged 20$ per unit after nego.

x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9869
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009 4:06 pm
Location: Singapore

Post by x9200 » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 12:14 pm

AC is IMHO a different kettle of fish - servicing/maintenance is often required by TA so you want to have a proof you are actually doing it.

revhappy
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1067
Joined: Wed, 10 Jun 2009 9:16 pm

Post by revhappy » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 3:45 pm

x9200 wrote:AC is IMHO a different kettle of fish - servicing/maintenance is often required by TA so you want to have a proof you are actually doing it.
Yeah, I find it funny though. Although they mention servicing. They dont mention what kind of servicing. For example in my previous house, when I called the AC servicing guys they said normal servicing 20$ per unit and chemical wash is 40$. I ofcourse chose only the normal serving. Also, I did only the final servicing and not every quarter. The reason I took that risk is because I while signing up the house the agent only showed me the last ac servicing reciept(done by previous tenant) as proof that it has been serviced so its ok. That was clue enough for me that my final reciept will be given to the next tenant ;)

This house also I am going to do the same thing. Just do the final AC servicing and show that as proof that the AC is fine. In the meanwhile I was considering cleaning it myself.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 39562
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 1:26 pm
Answers: 10
Location: Retired on the Little Red Dot

Post by sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 4:04 pm

You could find yourself in hot water. If you do your own servicing and only pay for the "theoretical" professionals, you could find yourself with a whopping bill which the LL will say, (over $150 or not) because you only had it serviced one time instead of quarterly, (you wont have the bills as proof) then you deliberately voided the T&A and the whole costs of repairing/replacing the units will come out of your pocket or out of your deposit.

Sometimes, if what you are doing has legal ramifications, you would be well placed to think twice, act once.
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

User avatar
the lynx
Governor
Governor
Posts: 5274
Joined: Thu, 09 Dec 2010 6:29 pm
Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location:

Post by the lynx » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 10:35 pm

revhappy wrote:Has anyone DIY cleaned the AC? I don't need to clean the large thing that is outside the window, but just clean the unit on the wall.

I noticed last house when we called the AC servicing they didn't do much, just dismantled it and washed it with vacuum cleaner and water were the only tools they used and they charged 20$ per unit after nego.
Me. Back at home and also here in Singapore. The difference is that I'm staying with an old lady, the owner, so I'm more than welcomed to clean the filters in AC if it would mean that she can save money on contractors.

The only trick is to familiarise with different models of AC because different models have slightly different way to open the compartment and to remove the filters to wash.

But if you're renting under strict conditions (keyword: TA), then you have to abide by the terms and conditions, like what x9200 and SMS said.

Segue
Regular
Regular
Posts: 80
Joined: Sat, 21 Feb 2009 1:09 pm
Location: Singapore

Post by Segue » Tue, 02 Oct 2012 9:30 pm

offshoreoildude wrote:For those who are a bit lost - DIY is common slang for masturbation in Singapore.
how how how?

Post Reply

Return to “Staying, Living in Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest