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Cultural question - Bumiputera (Boomi) and Singapore Malays

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Rani's
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Cultural question - Bumiputera (Boomi) and Singapore Malays

Postby Rani's » Wed, 05 Sep 2012 12:30 am

Being new to many aspects of Singapore, could I ask if the Malaysian Bumiputera (often called Boomi) is the same ethnic group as the Malay people in Singapore?

Are they culturally the same group of people? Do they have similar norms and traditions etc.? Thanks

offshoreoildude
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Postby offshoreoildude » Wed, 05 Sep 2012 1:58 am

In general terms yes, but the Malay Singapore folk actually are compromised of many groups intermingled - everything from the Bugis (Sea Gypsys) to Javanese and other Indonesians to of course Malays from the Archipelago.

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Postby Rani's » Wed, 05 Sep 2012 11:11 am

Thanks, so they are generally the same. If it's not a difficult question to answer, how do the two groups compare in terms of lifestyle and aspirations?

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Postby teck21 » Wed, 05 Sep 2012 11:32 am

Rani's wrote:Thanks, so they are generally the same. If it's not a difficult question to answer, how do the two groups compare in terms of lifestyle and aspirations?


Only ethnically, and of course they share the same religion. The concept of bumiputera is largely political today though, and from that point of view, Singapore does not have any.

The Malaysian Higher Education Ministry defined bumiputra as follows, depending on the region of origin of the individual applicant:[4]
Peninsular Malaysia

"If one of the parents is Muslim Malay/Orang Asli[5] as stated in Article 160 (2) Federal Constitution of Malaysia; thus the child is considered as a Bumiputra"

Sabah
"If one of the parents is a Muslim Malay or indigenous native of Sabah as stated in Article 160A (6)(a) Federal Constitution of Malaysia; thus his child is considered as a Bumiputra"

Sarawak
"If both of the parent are indigenous natives of Sarawak as stated in Article 160A (6)(b) Federal Constitution of Malaysia; thus their child is considered as a Bumiputra"

In addition to the interpretation given above, a broader definition of bumiputra include groups such as the Indonesian Pribumis, Malaysian Siamese, Muslim Indian Malaysians, Straits Chinese or Peranakan, Khmer people and the Kristang people of Portuguese-Eurasian descent.[6]

Most of these encompass the community that have been established in southeast Asia prior the arrival of the British colonist that have forever altered the demographic of Malaysia.

Others[who?] favour a definition encompassing all children of Bumiputra; there have been notable cases of people with one Bumiputra parent and one non-Bumiputra parent being dismissed as non-Bumiputra.[4] -

*Stolen from Wiki

So while most malaysian bumi's are ethnically similar to Malays in Singapore, it is not a given. That Malaysian girl who got a bronze medal in diving? She's Dayak from Sarawak, and she's considered bumi.

Lifestyles and aspirations? You'd best ask them.

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Postby Rani's » Thu, 06 Sep 2012 1:17 am

teck21 wrote:Only ethnically, and of course they share the same religion. The concept of bumiputera is largely political today though, and from that point of view, Singapore does not have any.

Thanks to you both of you about, that's helpful.

Although Ethnically the same, would I be correct in saying that opportunities, standards of education and social conditions in Singapore will have advanced the Singapore Malay people much more in terms of social standing than the Bumiputera people of Malaysia?

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Postby the lynx » Thu, 06 Sep 2012 8:35 am

Rani's wrote:
teck21 wrote:Only ethnically, and of course they share the same religion. The concept of bumiputera is largely political today though, and from that point of view, Singapore does not have any.

Thanks to you both of you about, that's helpful.

Although Ethnically the same, would I be correct in saying that opportunities, standards of education and social conditions in Singapore will have advanced the Singapore Malay people much more in terms of social standing than the Bumiputera people of Malaysia?


teck21 has given a very comprehensive explanation on the definition of bumiputeras.

Now your question above is touching more on the political part. In Malaysia, the bumiputera has the special privilege/status in Malaysia (as part of the Constitution and also as part of the deal to keep the non-bumiputeras) so it would be inaccurate to compare between Malaysia and Singapore because we'd be talking about different pools altogether.

In Malaysia, the bumiputeras have the first-class citizen status, being given the priority for education, scholarships, economic assistance, business opportunities, property purchase, and other otherwise-merit-based privileges.

So I'd opine that the Malaysian Malays (unfortunately the other types especially the indigenous people are somehow omitted out in the 'distribution' of such privileges, despite of having equal standing with them) are actually a bunch of privileged people.

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Postby v4jr4 » Thu, 06 Sep 2012 4:09 pm

the lynx wrote:
Rani's wrote:
teck21 wrote:Only ethnically, and of course they share the same religion. The concept of bumiputera is largely political today though, and from that point of view, Singapore does not have any.

Thanks to you both of you about, that's helpful.

Although Ethnically the same, would I be correct in saying that opportunities, standards of education and social conditions in Singapore will have advanced the Singapore Malay people much more in terms of social standing than the Bumiputera people of Malaysia?


teck21 has given a very comprehensive explanation on the definition of bumiputeras.

Now your question above is touching more on the political part. In Malaysia, the bumiputera has the special privilege/status in Malaysia (as part of the Constitution and also as part of the deal to keep the non-bumiputeras) so it would be inaccurate to compare between Malaysia and Singapore because we'd be talking about different pools altogether.

In Malaysia, the bumiputeras have the first-class citizen status, being given the priority for education, scholarships, economic assistance, business opportunities, property purchase, and other otherwise-merit-based privileges.

So I'd opine that the Malaysian Malays (unfortunately the other types especially the indigenous people are somehow omitted out in the 'distribution' of such privileges, despite of having equal standing with them) are actually a bunch of privileged people.


Does it mean that the Malays who was born and grown up in Singapore will be treated as first-class citizen if they decide to settle down in Malaysia? Or will they be treated a little bit "different"?
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