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Philippine cuisine

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Postby nakatago » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 9:36 am

x9200 wrote:
Filipinos just don't bother putting up restaurants to cater to other than Filipinos

But why? If there is a business opportunity there would people willing to earn some money. Hard to believe Filipinos are different :)
IMO what revhappy said makes good sense. The only other local majority eating pork are Chinese but they don't like heavy stuff. Indians like heavy stuff but not pork. Malay cuisine partly overlaps with Chinese and Indian (in the food textures and some flavor patters at least) so there is no clear contradiction here. These are the cuisines catering for cross-culture majorities and the Filipino cuisine only seems to suit one single major group and some Western minorities (still did not try it but looks good).

@SMS, your daughter?


Frankly, maybe because Filipinos don't think that big.

Current Filipino food has some Spanish influence (a lot of our dishes have Spanish-originated names for one thing) and those dishes similar to other Southeast Asian cuisine is not considered special enough to be worthy in a restaurant because of the lack of meat--meat is considered special and for showing off/special occasions. We still do have a lot of chicken and fish dishes but consider meat dishes more special and hence served in gatherings or in restaurants.

For food similar to the region, we also a lot of Chinese-influenced food as well--noodles and stir-fry mostly--but we recognize them as such and hence not banner them as Filipino food if foreigners ask. We also have our versions of the coconut-based Malay deserts. Grilled seafood is also popular but mostly without gravy (and we use vinegar as a dipping sauce! and we make ketchup out of bananas!) but for some reason, people don't think about them when asked about 'what is Filipino cuisine.'

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Postby zzm9980 » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 10:25 am

There is a big Filipino community in Chicago, my parent's neighbors actually. They used to always cook us these fried rolls (no idea what- In Chicago, everything is just an Egg Roll) and this fluffy pound cake. I think it was made with Pineapple. Note sure if those are popular dishes, or just what my neighbor liked to cook, but I sure miss them.

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Postby nakatago » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 10:47 am

zzm9980 wrote:There is a big Filipino community in Chicago, my parent's neighbors actually. They used to always cook us these fried rolls (no idea what- In Chicago, everything is just an Egg Roll) and this fluffy pound cake. I think it was made with Pineapple. Note sure if those are popular dishes, or just what my neighbor liked to cook, but I sure miss them.


lumpiang shanghai* (if small and meat-filled)/pritong lumpia (if big-ish and primarily vegetable filled) and crema de fruta?

*Yes, we have weird ways of naming food sometimes. e.g. Bicol express is named after the train going to Bicol; pancit Malabon is not known as such in Malabon (they call it pancit luglog).

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Postby zzm9980 » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 11:27 am

pritong lumpia. They were definitely big and vegetable filled.

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Postby morenangpinay » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 11:43 am

from what i have been reading lately, its slowly being promoted in the US, UK, middle east,etc. because other asian cuisines are already saturated in the market like thai, vietnamese, japanese, korean. There are also more Filipino chefs in the US now than before so there have been some efforts in promoting the cuisine. But for now, Philippine cuisine is served as a comfort food to Filipinos so when there is filipino food, it isnt plated, not appealing in appearance and oily for some.

Aside from this, it is unlike other asian food where there is only one particular way of preparing the dishes. Each dish has a different variation depending on where the person cooking came from. So for Nakatago, he would have a different adobo because he came from Pangasinan and I would have a different adobo because I came from the north. lol it has the fusion of spanish, malay, indian, chinese, american cuisines. Plus, when you think of Philippines or Manila, people think of Balut which has acquired the exotic image because of fear factor.

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Postby morenangpinay » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 11:46 am

we also use alot of vinegar (sugarcane vinegar) in our dishes because in the old days it is meant to preserve the food without needing refrigeration.

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Postby nakatago » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 11:48 am

zzm9980 wrote:pritong lumpia. They were definitely big and vegetable filled.


goes well when dipped in spicy vinegar

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Postby Barnsley » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 4:22 pm

Went to Tampines Mall for lunch today and the queue for the Filipino Cuisine was the longest in the Kopitiam, must have served 30+ in the 20 minutes or so I was there.

Apparently its supposed to be pretty authentic, looks a tad pricey though!!
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Postby the lynx » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 4:32 pm

morenangpinay wrote:Plus, when you think of Philippines or Manila, people think of Balut which has acquired the exotic image because of fear factor.


That, was how I first got to know about balut when I was a teenager. :P

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Postby nakatago » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 4:34 pm

morenangpinay wrote: So for Nakatago, he would have a different adobo because he came from Pangasinan and I would have a different adobo because I came from the north.


Pampanga; but I'm not from there. My mom is.

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Postby morenangpinay » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 4:52 pm

nakatago wrote:
morenangpinay wrote: So for Nakatago, he would have a different adobo because he came from Pangasinan and I would have a different adobo because I came from the north.


Pampanga; but I'm not from there. My mom is.


oops lol. my family comes from Ilocos, abra and bicol.

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Postby x9200 » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 5:35 pm

morenangpinay wrote:Aside from this, it is unlike other asian food where there is only one particular way of preparing the dishes.

But isn't typical of any cuisine actually? Every place, region or person adds some specific touch. Take for example something as simple as Thai style chicken. Leaving aside what this has to do with Thai, there is probably no place that serves it the same. At least I see the differences and still have or had my favorite one in one coffee shop in CCK :)

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Postby v4jr4 » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 6:02 pm

Unlike Indonesian cuisines in Singapore (which I find expensive), I saw one place in Jurong Point Kopitiam for Philippine cuisines. I'm not a pork lover, but giving a glance, I don't see anything out of ordinary. I'll give a shot later on. But does it different with Chinese cuisines? In terms of flavor.

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Postby JR8 » Tue, 24 Jul 2012 6:45 pm

Lechon mmmm!
Crispy pata mmmm2!

I think an interesting aspect of PH food is that it seems to be quite hybridised. So it has it's Asian roots but this is overlaid with very strong Spanish and American influences.

I wonder if when say a visitor in SG eats out in a restaurant they want to take a cultural as well as culinary journey. Maybe some PH food just has too many cultural influences so it in part loses it's identity??

Don't know, just musing, there must be a reason why there are not more PH restaurants, as the food itself can be exceptional.

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Re: Philippine cuisine

Postby pagkaingpinoytv » Thu, 26 Jan 2017 11:41 am

You can try home made Jollibee foods just google for the recipe or go directly to Jollibee they have the best fried chicken in the world

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTKD42V0fvg


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