Singapore Expats Forum

What Happens When You Live Abroad

Discuss about the latest news & interesting topics, real life experience or other out of topic discussions with locals & expatriates in Singapore.

User avatar
Vaucluse
Director
Director
Posts: 3443
Joined: Sun, 10 Jul 2005

Postby Vaucluse » Fri, 15 Jun 2012 10:55 pm

SingLaw wrote: Brits and Americans both move way more than people in most other countries. If such a statistic could be found,


Really? Is this a typically Anglo-shaded comment? Oh, and there are some stats about percentages of the population who own passports . . . and Americans are definitely not in the top ten by any means.

Congrats on your 30 years, Silverback . . .

I was a dip kid, was even born here in Asia (Thailand) and moved every four years with my parents . . . when I started working I did the same.

I think when one doesn't have firm roots in any particular place then adaptability comes into play . . . and pretty much every country has a lot to offer if one is prepared to ignore one's biases.
......................................................

'nuff said Image

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Fri, 15 Jun 2012 11:02 pm

Vaucluse wrote: . . . and pretty much every country has a lot to offer if
one is prepared to ignore one's biases.


This also requires one to accept the county's biases. Ironic eh...

User avatar
BigSis
Chatter
Chatter
Posts: 401
Joined: Sat, 17 Apr 2010

Postby BigSis » Sat, 16 Jun 2012 9:20 am

carteki wrote: I now have friends in just about all corners of the globe and actually find myself far more reluctant to make friends with newcomers to Singapore just because I know that they'll be leaving too.

In spite of what the author has said I do believe that it is possible to live abroad and not come home an expat. I was abroad for 2 years on my first stint away and on my return it felt as if I'd never left - my social diary was unchanged from 2 years previously, but this time after about 18 months away I realised that the experience changed me so much so that I'm not going to be able to "slot right in" again.


I'm the same with the friend thing - the longer I've lived here the less willing I have been to go out and meet new people for that very reason. I've just stuck with the few friends I've still got here after everyone else has moved on.

We're heading back home in less than 3 weeks and I'm sure it will be different but hopefully we won't feel too changed by our 10 years here (hmmm, I must remember not to desperately press the pedestrian crossing button like it's going to make a difference and walk around with my hand on my head to 'protect' my hair from the tropical downpour :wink: :? #-o :D )

Congrats on the 30 years SMS

SingLaw
Member
Member
Posts: 47
Joined: Thu, 01 Mar 2012

Postby SingLaw » Mon, 18 Jun 2012 1:42 am

Vaucluse wrote:
SingLaw wrote: Brits and Americans both move way more than people in most other countries. If such a statistic could be found,


Really? Is this a typically Anglo-shaded comment? Oh, and there are some stats about percentages of the population who own passports . . . and Americans are definitely not in the top ten by any means.

Congrats on your 30 years, Silverback . . .

I was a dip kid, was even born here in Asia (Thailand) and moved every four years with my parents . . . when I started working I did the same.

I think when one doesn't have firm roots in any particular place then adaptability comes into play . . . and pretty much every country has a lot to offer if one is prepared to ignore one's biases.


Sorry, to clarify, I meant move away from home (for instance, moving from Oklahoma City to Chicago), not necessarily move out of the country. In that respect, you're absolutely right that Americans rarely even leave the country, much less move. :)

User avatar
Vaucluse
Director
Director
Posts: 3443
Joined: Sun, 10 Jul 2005

Postby Vaucluse » Tue, 19 Jun 2012 2:13 pm

JR8 wrote:
Vaucluse wrote: . . . and pretty much every country has a lot to offer if
one is prepared to ignore one's biases.


This also requires one to accept the county's biases. Ironic eh...
Not really - the two can be mutually exclusive. Ignoring someone/thing doesn't require acceptance at all.

SingLaw wrote:
Sorry, to clarify, I meant move away from home (for instance, moving from Oklahoma City to Chicago), not necessarily move out of the country. In that respect, you're absolutely right that Americans rarely even leave the country, much less move. :)
No worries, my apologies for misunderstanding
......................................................



'nuff said Image


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “General Discussions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest