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How to convert your motorcycle license into a Singapore one

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sundaymorningstaple
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 28 Jan 2013 5:41 pm

Watch what happens when you try to ride a bike according to the law. e.g., staying in the traffic lane instead of tearing along the dotted lines. Sure you want to ride here? Was tailgating first and deliberate whacked the bike.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=joaWef1W5Nc

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Re: A question of conversion timing

Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 29 Jan 2013 12:34 am

The Ref wrote:So if you have had a DL for around 20 years, but a motorbike license for less than 12 months what happens? I would declare as I am either too honest or a really bad lier :oops:

Do you still have to do the practical tests, training, ...?

Given I dont yet have either a car nor a bike should I just wait until I have had the Motor bike license 12 months before converting even if I am not riding one?

Thanks.


Contrary to what others say, I find Singapore to be a much safer city in which to motorcycle than other cities in the world. In any city in Texas, you will find much more aggressive drivers, higher speeds, larger vehicles, fewer bikes, and a lot less awareness of motorcycle traffic. Don't even ask me about Athens... beyond insanity and the only place I really feared for my life.

However, you need to become a proficient motorcycle rider to live a long time. Buy, read, memorize, and practice this book: http://www.amazon.com/Proficient-Motorc ... 1889540536. It is amazing the stupid things riders do in Singapore, in particular, cutting around cars on the inside of the corner, then wondering why they got knocked down.

With respect to license timings: If your driving license doesn't show the date of acquisition of your various endorsements, you need to provide additional documentation. When I submitted mine, it showed that I first got my license way back when, showed my motorcycle endorsement as well, but didn't show that it was gained 10 years later. In other words, it really depends upon what the documentation says.

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Postby x9200 » Tue, 29 Jan 2013 4:56 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Watch what happens when you try to ride a bike according to the law. e.g., staying in the traffic lane instead of tearing along the dotted lines. Sure you want to ride here? Was tailgating first and deliberate whacked the bike.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=joaWef1W5Nc

This is just one aggressive idiot that should be removed for some longer time from the society. In my everyday riding here for a number of years I had so far probably less than 3 situations where somebody was visually unhappy with me driving within the lane and I had only one situation with someone trying to scare me to take me out. I had no more then 10 situations where my horn was not sufficient to preserve my way.
Also, this is not true what was suggested by another poster that the car drivers particularly ignore motorcyclists - it's a general way of driving here so they do exactly the same towards cars. Comparing to many other countries people in Singapore are not actively aggressive on the roads. They drive/ride like sh*t but are very predictable.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 29 Jan 2013 6:53 am

We will have to just agree to disagree with this one. I've been knocked down 3 times in 30 years on a bicycle. all on clear, sunny, dry uncrowded conditions. Fortunately I've always had a helmet on. I have also been forced to the curb a number of times. I have also watched vehicles deliberately tailgate motorcycles within a metre of their rear wheel at speed. Granted motorcyclists here do garner much support because of their weaving in and out of traffic but that's still not a reason to deliberately crowd or squeeze motorcycles, which is done all the time.

Yes, you can ride here safely, but you have to use a modicum of common sense and not ride like the locals as that just drawn the ire of the cage drivers.

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Re: A question of conversion timing

Postby offshoreoildude » Tue, 29 Jan 2013 8:04 am

Strong Eagle wrote:
The Ref wrote:So if you have had a DL for around 20 years, but a motorbike license for less than 12 months what happens? I would declare as I am either too honest or a really bad lier :oops:

Do you still have to do the practical tests, training, ...?

Given I dont yet have either a car nor a bike should I just wait until I have had the Motor bike license 12 months before converting even if I am not riding one?

Thanks.


Contrary to what others say, I find Singapore to be a much safer city in which to motorcycle than other cities in the world. In any city in Texas, you will find much more aggressive drivers, higher speeds, larger vehicles, fewer bikes, and a lot less awareness of motorcycle traffic. Don't even ask me about Athens... beyond insanity and the only place I really feared for my life.

However, you need to become a proficient motorcycle rider to live a long time. Buy, read, memorize, and practice this book: http://www.amazon.com/Proficient-Motorc ... 1889540536. It is amazing the stupid things riders do in Singapore, in particular, cutting around cars on the inside of the corner, then wondering why they got knocked down.

With respect to license timings: If your driving license doesn't show the date of acquisition of your various endorsements, you need to provide additional documentation. When I submitted mine, it showed that I first got my license way back when, showed my motorcycle endorsement as well, but didn't show that it was gained 10 years later. In other words, it really depends upon what the documentation says.


+1 one on motorbike riding here. At least here there are so many bikes that car drivers are conscious of them - esp when they change lanes. In Perth now there are so few bike riders that car drivers don't even think of them anymore and hence accidents happen.
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Postby x9200 » Tue, 29 Jan 2013 8:58 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:We will have to just agree to disagree with this one. I've been knocked down 3 times in 30 years on a bicycle. all on clear, sunny, dry uncrowded conditions. Fortunately I've always had a helmet on. I have also been forced to the curb a number of times. I have also watched vehicles deliberately tailgate motorcycles within a metre of their rear wheel at speed. Granted motorcyclists here do garner much support because of their weaving in and out of traffic but that's still not a reason to deliberately crowd or squeeze motorcycles, which is done all the time.

Yes, you can ride here safely, but you have to use a modicum of common sense and not ride like the locals as that just drawn the ire of the cage drivers.

I agree with the above with no objections. It has all little to do with any form of common sense. This is the hard knowledge that has to be absorbed in order to ride safely. One of the most fatal mistake is to assume people drive/ride here according to some acceptable standards and I am not talking about signalling the change in the driving direction but offences of much more serious caliber. Overtaking vehicles signalling right turning from the right happens. Going straight or left from the lane for right turn only is common (I got hit this way). Rapid changing of a number of lanes crossing the hatched or chevron marked area just to get to the exit in the last moment is a standard practice. Things like these that you not expect to happen in any more developed country.

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Postby stuckmojo » Tue, 09 Apr 2013 2:33 pm

Hi everyone,

it seems my move to Singapore might actually happen after all. Priority number 1 is getting myself a Harley (ideally a new one).

I have a full unlimited European licence obtained through testing back in 1996. I was a near pro motocross rider in the late 1990's and had a Ninja 600 back then.

In the last 9 years I had no bike of my own but repeatedly rented bikes in Egypt for desert safaris (which is one of the best experiences a rider can have).

So here's the conundrum: I read somewhere that:

- you have 12 months to convert your licence.
but
- no finance on foreign licence + international permit.
and
- risk of getting a moped licence if converted.

I am worried about this. I ride my father in law's Harley and I am insured on it.

Do you think I will still get downgraded? I wouldn't be to happy about it.

Thanks for reading

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Postby offshoreoildude » Tue, 09 Apr 2013 2:44 pm

stuckmojo wrote:Hi everyone,

it seems my move to Singapore might actually happen after all. Priority number 1 is getting myself a Harley (ideally a new one).

I have a full unlimited European licence obtained through testing back in 1996. I was a near pro motocross rider in the late 1990's and had a Ninja 600 back then.

In the last 9 years I had no bike of my own but repeatedly rented bikes in Egypt for desert safaris (which is one of the best experiences a rider can have).

So here's the conundrum: I read somewhere that:

- you have 12 months to convert your licence.
but
- no finance on foreign licence + international permit.
and
- risk of getting a moped licence if converted.

I am worried about this. I ride my father in law's Harley and I am insured on it.

Do you think I will still get downgraded? I wouldn't be to happy about it.

Thanks for reading


I doubt you'll be downgraded. FYI H-D here rent out Harleys. I have a sportster myself.
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Postby Strong Eagle » Wed, 10 Apr 2013 12:54 am

Singapore Police Force website changed a couple of years ago to explicitly allow unlimited class 2 license conversions with proper experience. I don't think you'll have a problem.

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Postby stuckmojo » Wed, 10 Apr 2013 4:15 pm

Strong Eagle wrote:Singapore Police Force website changed a couple of years ago to explicitly allow unlimited class 2 license conversions with proper experience. I don't think you'll have a problem.


thanks,

and thanks offshoreoildude

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Postby Yeboah » Tue, 21 May 2013 2:14 pm

Afternoon gents,

Could one of the mods update the links in the op's post please?

I've lived in SG for 20 months now and previously commuted in London for 8 years on a bike, first on a CBT and then on a 125 license that morphed into a full license after two years (I forget what it is called), so I happily rode a Yamaha ZJ6-N for the past three years before moving here.

My driver's (car) license still bears the 125cc restriction on it with nothing to mention that it is tacitly understood in the UK that after two years that is no longer in force. (My XJ6 was fitted with a restrictor kit when I first bought it)

Has anyone here has experience of converting such a license and have they run into any issues with this nuance. I live in Novena but plan on moving further out so will be looking to start commuting on a bike again and I really dont feel like using a scooter or tinpot bike again.

Cheers

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Postby bgd » Tue, 21 May 2013 2:39 pm

Without knowing how it works I would have thought you should have updated your license with your new endorsement. I guess you can still do that?

I reckon you will be limited to a 2B here if your license only has a 125cc endorsement.

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Postby Yeboah » Tue, 21 May 2013 3:05 pm

bgd wrote:Without knowing how it works I would have thought you should have updated your license with your new endorsement. I guess you can still do that?

I reckon you will be limited to a 2B here if your license only has a 125cc endorsement.


Perhaps, the point is that legally I can ride without cc restriction in the UK but my license shows the 125cc restriction.

Without having my license in front of me now (its at home) my best guess is that I have a A license staged access:

https://www.gov.uk/ride-motorcycle-mope ... quirements

A

Motorbikes unlimited in size/power, with or without a sidecar, and motor tricycles with power output over 15 kW

Direct access - CBT theory and practical (you must be at least 24 years old); Staged access route - held an A2 licence for a minimum of 2 years - practical test (21 or over)

24 (direct) or 21 (staged access)



Its the same test but i passed on a 125 rather than a 600

The tacit understanding on the license is that you ride a 125 or >125 restricted to 125 for two years than are automatically grandfathered into the full license. (thats what I did, rode a 600 restricted to 125 for two years then had the restrictor removed)

Im guessing its this nuance which will get lost in translation in SG, unless anyone else with experience of doing this can confirm?

Cheers

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Postby x9200 » Tue, 21 May 2013 8:18 pm

You will probably need to make a convincing case:
1) showing some supporting documents (i.e. a print out from the web page)
2) a proof of you riding an unrestricted motorbike for some time (2-3 years or more)

They can (or used to) be very reasonable.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 21 May 2013 9:02 pm

Yeboah wrote:Afternoon gents,

Could one of the mods update the links in the op's post please?

I've lived in SG for 20 months now and previously commuted in London for 8 years on a bike, first on a CBT and then on a 125 license that morphed into a full license after two years (I forget what it is called), so I happily rode a Yamaha ZJ6-N for the past three years before moving here.

My driver's (car) license still bears the 125cc restriction on it with nothing to mention that it is tacitly understood in the UK that after two years that is no longer in force. (My XJ6 was fitted with a restrictor kit when I first bought it)

Has anyone here has experience of converting such a license and have they run into any issues with this nuance. I live in Novena but plan on moving further out so will be looking to start commuting on a bike again and I really dont feel like using a scooter or tinpot bike again.

Cheers


Link has been updated - moderator

Classes of driving licence that may be converted
Foreign licence conversion is only granted for class 2B and class 3 qualified driving licences. Learner driving licence may not be converted.

Those who wish to obtain a class 4 and/or class 5 licence need to go through training and a prescribed practical test before they can obtain the Singapore class 4 or 5 licence. No direct conversion is granted for these heavy vehicle licences.

Conversion for a higher capacity or open category motorcycle licence is normally not granted unless there are documentary proof of training, testing, ownership of bigger motorcycle and insurance policy indicating that you have gone through proper training and testing regime and have had at least one year riding experience on the road.


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