Singapore Expats Forum

Choosing a Race

A moderated forum for serious discussions only.
User avatar
the lynx
Governor
Governor
Posts: 5272
Joined: Thu, 09 Dec 2010
Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location:

Postby the lynx » Wed, 26 Sep 2012 11:10 am

Brah wrote:If it's so petty why keep dodging it? Does it really matter whether others agree or not?

As you were the one who mentioned AMK, which I'd never heard in years here, and as it seems to have originated from your country (I don't know if that's the case), to hear from someone from there if they are not only familiar with it but have actually used it is a pretty fair question.

If you haven't you have nothing to hide; if you did you have a lot of supporters here and I doubt that anyone, including me, would condemn you for it. Without hearing it from you it becomes like Romney's taxes.

Sorry you perceive me to shoot the messenger, I don't see it that way and I wouldn't take trying to get a straight answer so personal.

That's not to say that over the years I haven't gone after a few select and deserving people on the forum, you're not one of them and I find your posts among the better ones.


And I do want to know more about whether AM is a derivative of AMK - but I'll ask local friends as I think we've got all the responses we're going to get here.


EF - interesting, and thanks for that. Your post raises the question as to whether this is strictly Malaysian slang.


So how are Caucasians referred to in places like Jakarta?


the lynx wrote:Nah, I'm not uncomfortable. In fact, I'm amused by how tightly you bite at a petty matter. Pretty sure others would agree with me on that. And I'm not obligated to answer you since your intention has been proven to shoot the messenger after all.


Very well. I will give you a good run of your bite then.

When I was very young, adults and older children around me use that. So it is no surprise that it got into my own lexicon as a little child. Of course it didn't have to take long for me to learn (especially kindergarten, media and READING) that that was not correct and yeah, you could guess how quickly the transition was.

Of course that doesn't stop the AMK from continually being used around me until now but like I said earlier on, it is all about educating and making others aware that it is wrong.

Slurs could be worse, for all you want to know/care, where the prefix AM can be used with other objects (to the Cantonese equivalent) but that is very wrong. I'm not gonna go there because it is not the focus of our discussion, I have no part of it, and you can go bite elsewhere.

Interesting bit: I also thought it is the Malaysian thing, until I heard very few uncles and aunties here used them (but then again if they could be Malaysian-born citizens, so *shrugs*).
Last edited by the lynx on Wed, 26 Sep 2012 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35179
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 26 Sep 2012 11:14 am



Excellent link and one that ALL expats should read. The article really struck home, I'm sure, for a lot of "whities" who've never experienced REAL racism directed at them personally (or what they perceive to be racism). I came through the race riots and the burning of Washington DC back in the 60's & 70's and while in Washington in the 70's (the population there was 94% non-whites) I learned real quick about being labeled. I've never had a problem with foreign countries and being called Ang Moh, or Mat Salleh or bule (I worked in Indonesia for 12 years from 1982~1994. I've also been called Mr. Kentang a lot while in Indonesia as well because of my distinct hair style. It really doesn't bother me because I understand tone of voice even if I don't understand the actual language. I've grown past being the "vast" majority many years ago.

User avatar
v4jr4
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 887
Joined: Mon, 09 Jul 2012
Location: Chocolate Factory

Postby v4jr4 » Wed, 26 Sep 2012 11:24 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:I've also been called Mr. Kentang a lot while in Indonesia as well because of my distinct hair style.


Back then, my friends gave the title "Mr. Kentang" (translate: Mr. Potato) to someone who prefers potatoes over rice, be it foreigners or locals :P
"Budget Expat"

User avatar
zzm9980
Governor
Governor
Posts: 6842
Joined: Wed, 06 Jul 2011
Location: Once more unto the breach

Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 26 Sep 2012 11:58 am

the lynx wrote:When I was very young, adults and older children around me use that. So it is no surprise that it got into my own lexicon as a little child. Of course it didn't have to take long for me to learn (especially kindergarten, media and READING) that that was not correct and yeah, you could guess how quickly the transition was.


Finally! Brah gets Lynx to admit she was a closet racist when she was five. Can this thread die now? It's getting worse than a thread about cats. :roll:

User avatar
Brah
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1962
Joined: Sat, 18 Dec 2010

Postby Brah » Sat, 29 Sep 2012 4:10 pm

+1 and +1

Well written, balanced and comprehensive. I've seen that site before but never that entry.
sundaymorningstaple wrote:


Excellent link and one that ALL expats should read. The article really struck home, I'm sure, for a lot of "whities" who've never experienced REAL racism directed at them personally (or what they perceive to be racism).

There is another case SMS, such as Japan and probably Korea. Although there are words for white people ('hakujin') and black people ('kokujin') they tend to divide the world somewhat xenophobically into Japanese / not Japanese.

Where the polite word for foreigners is "gaikokujin" ('person from a foreign country'), people tend to use "gaijin" ('outside person') more and it is sometimes derogatory and sometimes not and some people, myself included sometimes don't like it, there is a lot of variation in the use.

If a little kid says "gaijin" to someone they're with as if I'm invisible (happens sometimes) I politely and in a friendly manner correct them "gaikokujin" and the gaffe is diluted.

Thanks for the answers Lynx and v4jr4.

And should I get some info from my Singaporean colleagues or friends if they think AM is derivative, I'll update here.

Then zzm, my part in the thread will be done.

In the meantime, depending on the situation, I will consider my response to being called AM with replying "....orh moh", just to see the reactions.

You know, if one person, just one person does it they may think he's weird and they’ll ignore him.

And if two people, two people do it, they may get scared and they won't talk to either of them.

And if three people do it, three, can you imagine, three people replying to someone calling them Ang Moh with Ohr Moh - they may think it's an organization.

And can you, can you imagine fifty people a day, I said fifty people a day responding to Ang Moh with Ohr Moh - friends they may think it's a movement.

And that's what it would be - the Ang Moh Anti-Label Movement, and all you got to do to join is sing it the next time it comes around on the guitar.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Fri, 05 Oct 2012 3:16 am

Brah wrote:And BTW, your location is "Chocolate City" - from my Parliament / Funkadelic days do I recall that correctly as being Washington DC?



mmm mmm mmm, mmm and mmm!

User avatar
Brah
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1962
Joined: Sat, 18 Dec 2010

Postby Brah » Sat, 06 Oct 2012 12:38 am

and that was the easier of my two obscure references

my guess is my last one sailed over everyone's head, but that may be more of a generational thing


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Strictly Speaking”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest