Singapore Expats Forum

can usa citizen get singapore pr

Moving to Singapore? Ask our regular expats in Singapore questions on relocation and their experience here. Ask about banking, employment pass, insurance, visa, work permit, citizenship or immigration issues.

Sponsored by:
Image
The Club Residences

User avatar
Mi Amigo
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1791
Joined: Sat, 19 Jun 2004
Location: Kinto Pino

Postby Mi Amigo » Mon, 06 Feb 2012 4:58 pm

All in all, pretty cynical IMHO. As we often remind people, PR stands for Permanent Residence, and citizenship is obviously intended to be for the long haul too. I could sort of understand it if someone were to obtain US citizenship, then later on (for example) be posted to Singapore, with an EP application ensuing. But the OP has only just gained the right to stay indefinitely in the US and already they're looking to move 'permanently' to Singapore. I very much doubt that the authorities here would entertain such a request (unless accompanied by a substantial cash investment), and the OP has requested that we don't offer any more advice :D...

However, for the benefit of anyone reading this thread and thinking that perhaps the regulars were being somewhat 'hard' on the OP, I think it's worth spelling out that this kind of behaviour just serves to make things more difficult for those people who genuinely want to permanently settle here. The image of some individuals being out to 'collect' PRs / citizenship in a sequence of countries will undoubtedly make the authorities more hesitant and demanding towards all applicants.

BTW, does anyone else think this might be a wind-up? 'jkgm' almost looks like someone just randomly pressed their keyboard a couple of times. Probably just my suspicious mind.
Be careful what you wish for

User avatar
the lynx
Governor
Governor
Posts: 5272
Joined: Thu, 09 Dec 2010
Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location: Location:

Postby the lynx » Mon, 06 Feb 2012 5:08 pm

Here is an interesting exchange (Disclaimer: may not be substantiated).

Met an Indian PR here who shared with me how regretful he was to sign up for the USA green card. Apparently it serves only to strike him out for successive separate visa applications in the USA after that.

And he is not the first. Looks like all Indian nationals I know who applied for green card had the same predicament.

Anyone (especially from different nationality) who also applied for green card before and found themselves struck out for other visa applications in USA?

User avatar
zzm9980
Governor
Governor
Posts: 6842
Joined: Wed, 06 Jul 2011
Location: Once more unto the breach

Postby zzm9980 » Mon, 06 Feb 2012 5:30 pm

the lynx wrote:Here is an interesting exchange (Disclaimer: may not be substantiated).

Met an Indian PR here who shared with me how regretful he was to sign up for the USA green card. Apparently it serves only to strike him out for successive separate visa applications in the USA after that.

And he is not the first. Looks like all Indian nationals I know who applied for green card had the same predicament.

Anyone (especially from different nationality) who also applied for green card before and found themselves struck out for other visa applications in USA?


I don't quite understand. What other visa applications would he want? Or did he want the ability to bounce back and forth between the US and somewhere else?

I'll be quite though guys. I've said it before here, and I'll say it again. I've spent weeks and months in India at a time. If I lived there, I'd be pulling every possible trick in the book too so I could GTFO to anywhere else, and trying to bring as many of my loved ones with me as possible.

User avatar
Mi Amigo
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1791
Joined: Sat, 19 Jun 2004
Location: Kinto Pino

Postby Mi Amigo » Mon, 06 Feb 2012 6:16 pm

zzm9980 wrote:I don't quite understand. What other visa applications would he want? Or did he want the ability to bounce back and forth between the US and somewhere else?

Looks to me like a case of wanting to have cake and eat it. If we consider a green card to be 'PR' then personally I don't think it's reasonable to expect to be 'permanently' resident in one place, then 'permanently' resident in another. Or have I missed something?

I can see your point about why someone might want to leave a country and live 'permanently' somewhere else for a 'better life', but if they've been granted that priviledge by one country then it seems to be somewhat ungrateful to then go and collect another PR somewhere else. Yes, I know, nothing in life is really permanent, and one has to go where the work is, but such overly rapid changes from one country to another seem a bit out of order in my book. Surely that's what L1 visas and EPs are for?
Be careful what you wish for

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Mon, 06 Feb 2012 6:25 pm

This topic is straight from the mould! I believe the presumptuous 'American Indian' demanding help has also been parodied in the parody topic in Jokes/Humour.

Then we've got Planet Fruitloop going on on another thread.

Two in one day :o :?

User avatar
zzm9980
Governor
Governor
Posts: 6842
Joined: Wed, 06 Jul 2011
Location: Once more unto the breach

Postby zzm9980 » Mon, 06 Feb 2012 7:53 pm

Mi Amigo wrote:
zzm9980 wrote:I don't quite understand. What other visa applications would he want? Or did he want the ability to bounce back and forth between the US and somewhere else?

Looks to me like a case of wanting to have cake and eat it. If we consider a green card to be 'PR' then personally I don't think it's reasonable to expect to be 'permanently' resident in one place, then 'permanently' resident in another. Or have I missed something?

I can see your point about why someone might want to leave a country and live 'permanently' somewhere else for a 'better life', but if they've been granted that priviledge by one country then it seems to be somewhat ungrateful to then go and collect another PR somewhere else. Yes, I know, nothing in life is really permanent, and one has to go where the work is, but such overly rapid changes from one country to another seem a bit out of order in my book. Surely that's what L1 visas and EPs are for?


Fair enough :) I just don't understand why anyone would want American citizenship if they don't even want to live there. We should encourage this guy to get, so he can see how hard it is to get rid of once his tax bills start rolling in!

User avatar
ecureilx
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 9812
Joined: Fri, 20 Aug 2010

Postby ecureilx » Mon, 06 Feb 2012 8:00 pm

zzm9980 wrote:
I don't quite understand. What other visa applications would he want? Or did he want the ability to bounce back and forth between the US and somewhere else?


it is called "keeping all options open"

One of my friends in Australia, doing immigration consultancy, is plainly refusing to handle residency for Australia for certain nationals, as, after application, they lamely claim that 'circumstances have changed, and sorry, we are not going to pay you, as we are not going to pick up the Aussie residency .. '

And let's see if the OP has 'explored' Australia as well ?? :)

User avatar
Strong Eagle
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 11110
Joined: Sat, 10 Jul 2004
Location: Off The Red Dot
Contact:

Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 06 Feb 2012 8:23 pm

It takes a minimum of five years residency in the US to become an American citizen. It is a very valuable citizenship to have, although perhaps not terribly healthy for you in some Islamic countries.

To look charitably at the OP, he's done is five years, and apparently is the kind of material the US wants, as applications for citizenship tend to outstrip the actual number granted.

Less charitably, is that rather than discussing what is needed in terms of employment passes etc, as an American citizen, we jump directly to PR. This is suspect... most people that come to Singapore do so for a job... and the requisite employment pass.

Given that the OP will have to document his citizenship via his naturalization certificate, and given that the date will be relatively recent, I think he will raise large red flags with the gahmen... unless there is a demonstrable reason for moving... like the company you are with in the US is moving you to Singapore. Otherwise, the bells go off.

User avatar
Strong Eagle
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 11110
Joined: Sat, 10 Jul 2004
Location: Off The Red Dot
Contact:

Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 07 Feb 2012 5:55 pm

The musings about English, or lack thereof, have been split to a new thread, Proper and Improper English, to be found in Leisure, Jokes, and Rubbish.


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Relocating, Moving to Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests