Singapore Expats Forum

China Professor called Singapore people piece of shit

Discuss about the latest news & interesting topics, real life experience or other out of topic discussions with locals & expatriates in Singapore.

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9320
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Postby x9200 » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 2:02 pm

BillyB wrote:
beppi wrote:Experience shows that countries which emphasisze their cultural and/or ethnic homogenity (e.g. France, Korea, Japan, China) are less tolerant towards foreigners than a muti-cultural nation.
Anybody who has been to China and Singapore will attest that the level of rudeness is much greater in China.
These are two major aspects I count under "graciousness". Singapore wins hands-down, whatever these Chinese nationalists want to believe.


Personally, I'd seriously question that.

I've lived in Singapore, Hong Kong and worked in stints in Shanghai, Qingdao and Beijing.

I think you're mis-interpreting the less-developed citizens in China and communities as being rude; spitting, local slang, not understanding foreigners. A big factor which contributes to your comment is not understanding the local dialects and slang.
I find the large majority of mainlanders to be polite, funny, very driven and eager to make a success of opportunities they are given.


How do you define rudeness?

User avatar
BillyB
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1807
Joined: Fri, 23 Jul 2010
Location: My laptop

Postby BillyB » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 2:22 pm

x9200 wrote:
BillyB wrote:
beppi wrote:Experience shows that countries which emphasisze their cultural and/or ethnic homogenity (e.g. France, Korea, Japan, China) are less tolerant towards foreigners than a muti-cultural nation.
Anybody who has been to China and Singapore will attest that the level of rudeness is much greater in China.
These are two major aspects I count under "graciousness". Singapore wins hands-down, whatever these Chinese nationalists want to believe.


Personally, I'd seriously question that.

I've lived in Singapore, Hong Kong and worked in stints in Shanghai, Qingdao and Beijing.

I think you're mis-interpreting the less-developed citizens in China and communities as being rude; spitting, local slang, not understanding foreigners. A big factor which contributes to your comment is not understanding the local dialects and slang.
I find the large majority of mainlanders to be polite, funny, very driven and eager to make a success of opportunities they are given.


How do you define rudeness?


Spend a week in Singapore and you'll have your answer!

I'm not opening this hornets nest, again.....

User avatar
QRM
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1831
Joined: Mon, 17 Oct 2005
Location: Nassim hill

Postby QRM » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 2:37 pm

Dont forget only one generation ago in China, anyone who showed any sign of education, civility, or graciousness was strung up and had the little red book shoved up place were the sun dont shine. To survive you dumped manners and any indication that you were well to do and just act like a peasant.

Manthink
Regular
Regular
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri, 25 Feb 2011

Postby Manthink » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 2:38 pm

BillyB wrote:
x9200 wrote: How do you define rudeness?


Spend a week in Singapore and you'll have your answer!
I'm not opening this hornets nest, again.....


A week?! Man! it took me more than a few weeks to understand the "rudeness" in my cousin's pet parrot. :lol:

Avoid generalization as this Beijing professor had done and one shall steer a hornet's nest not.

BTW, over 1/3 of Singapore residence are non-local...so go figure. :wink:

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9320
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Postby x9200 » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 2:45 pm

BillyB wrote:
x9200 wrote:
BillyB wrote:
beppi wrote:Experience shows that countries which emphasisze their cultural and/or ethnic homogenity (e.g. France, Korea, Japan, China) are less tolerant towards foreigners than a muti-cultural nation.
Anybody who has been to China and Singapore will attest that the level of rudeness is much greater in China.
These are two major aspects I count under "graciousness". Singapore wins hands-down, whatever these Chinese nationalists want to believe.


Personally, I'd seriously question that.

I've lived in Singapore, Hong Kong and worked in stints in Shanghai, Qingdao and Beijing.

I think you're mis-interpreting the less-developed citizens in China and communities as being rude; spitting, local slang, not understanding foreigners. A big factor which contributes to your comment is not understanding the local dialects and slang.
I find the large majority of mainlanders to be polite, funny, very driven and eager to make a success of opportunities they are given.


How do you define rudeness?


Spend a week in Singapore and you'll have your answer!

I'm not opening this hornets nest, again.....

Too late, it's open already. I asked because from your post above you seemed to have it related to the intentions of somebody rather than a cultural denominator. In such case majority of Singaporeans are polite.

User avatar
BillyB
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1807
Joined: Fri, 23 Jul 2010
Location: My laptop

Postby BillyB » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 2:56 pm

x9200 wrote:
BillyB wrote:
x9200 wrote:
BillyB wrote:
beppi wrote:Experience shows that countries which emphasisze their cultural and/or ethnic homogenity (e.g. France, Korea, Japan, China) are less tolerant towards foreigners than a muti-cultural nation.
Anybody who has been to China and Singapore will attest that the level of rudeness is much greater in China.
These are two major aspects I count under "graciousness". Singapore wins hands-down, whatever these Chinese nationalists want to believe.


Personally, I'd seriously question that.

I've lived in Singapore, Hong Kong and worked in stints in Shanghai, Qingdao and Beijing.

I think you're mis-interpreting the less-developed citizens in China and communities as being rude; spitting, local slang, not understanding foreigners. A big factor which contributes to your comment is not understanding the local dialects and slang.
I find the large majority of mainlanders to be polite, funny, very driven and eager to make a success of opportunities they are given.


How do you define rudeness?


Spend a week in Singapore and you'll have your answer!

I'm not opening this hornets nest, again.....

Too late, it's open already. I asked because from your post above you seemed to have it related to the intentions of somebody rather than a cultural denominator. In such case majority of Singaporeans are polite.


Each to his own. Maybe I just have bad luck in that I experienced relatively little rudeness in China compared to to what I witness on a daily basis in Singapore.

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9320
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Postby x9200 » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 3:16 pm

What I mean is basically whether they (Singaporeans, Chinese) are aware of being rude. If not, hard to call it (objectively) this way. Surely in my subjective perception (cultural) they are rude but it varies. I.e. I found the mainland Chinese I know here in Singapore to be more rude, of questionable ethics and not flexible comparing to Singaporeans. Exactly opposite, if I purchase from E-bay.

User avatar
BillyB
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1807
Joined: Fri, 23 Jul 2010
Location: My laptop

Postby BillyB » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 3:35 pm

x9200 wrote:What I mean is basically whether they (Singaporeans, Chinese) are aware of being rude. If not, hard to call it (objectively) this way. Surely in my subjective perception (cultural) they are rude but it varies. I.e. I found the mainland Chinese I know here in Singapore to be more rude, of questionable ethics and not flexible comparing to Singaporeans. Exactly opposite, if I purchase from E-bay.


Well they do say ignorance is bliss. Based on your perception, you're saying that you perceive someone to be rude less rude if they don't do it intentionally?

So if a class of people are rude by nature, that doesn't constitute rudeness because its learnt and subconscious behaviour?! Try telling that to a judge...

I understand cultural quirks and differences, just in my view some things are universally acknowledged as rude in most cultures.

Additionally, how do you factor in access to education and upbringing? Because that would put whole communities at a disadvantage or advantage (depending on which side you take).

Perception is completely subjective of course

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9320
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Postby x9200 » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 4:14 pm

BillyB wrote:
x9200 wrote:What I mean is basically whether they (Singaporeans, Chinese) are aware of being rude. If not, hard to call it (objectively) this way. Surely in my subjective perception (cultural) they are rude but it varies. I.e. I found the mainland Chinese I know here in Singapore to be more rude, of questionable ethics and not flexible comparing to Singaporeans. Exactly opposite, if I purchase from E-bay.


Well they do say ignorance is bliss. Based on your perception, you're saying that you perceive someone to be rude less rude if they don't do it intentionally?

Kind of. Rudeness affects more emotions (subconsciousness) than my more objective side so I can not help myself and still see it rude. It is a justifying excuse that makes it slightly better in my eyes.

So if a class of people are rude by nature, that doesn't constitute rudeness because its learnt and subconscious behaviour?! Try telling that to a judge...

They may be rude only from your perspective because you were pre-conditioned this or that way. So were they.

I understand cultural quirks and differences, just in my view some things are universally acknowledged as rude in most cultures.

Probably, but we are talking about whole societies or nations that apparently have it somehow differently.

Additionally, how do you factor in access to education and upbringing? Because that would put whole communities at a disadvantage or advantage (depending on which side you take).

Same thing as for the cultural factor. If somebody is truly not aware of wrongdoing it is hard to make him truly guilty (ethically). It is not on a legal ground - the law has to be more pragmatic, so a judge will rule by the book not by emotions but even in such case the cultural preconditioning is often taken into account.

Perception is completely subjective of course

User avatar
carteki
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1237
Joined: Mon, 28 Apr 2008
Location: Singapore
Contact:

Postby carteki » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 6:15 pm

It is true that rudeness is based in culture. I met an american lady living in China. She told the story of how local Chinese friend walked into her apart. and spat a huge gob on the floor. I was horrified and thought it extremely rude, but in his mind it was probably normal. (she did tell him never to do it again though)

User avatar
BillyB
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1807
Joined: Fri, 23 Jul 2010
Location: My laptop

Postby BillyB » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 6:42 pm

carteki wrote:It is true that rudeness is based in culture. I met an american lady living in China. She told the story of how local Chinese friend walked into her apart. and spat a huge gob on the floor. I was horrified and thought it extremely rude, but in his mind it was probably normal. (she did tell him never to do it again though)


Not at all, that's just disgusting. Street, yard - yes - but not in peoples houses. It could be an extreme case.

But then again it comes down to what you were taught by your environment / surroundings and also what is tolerated by different people.

Manthink
Regular
Regular
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri, 25 Feb 2011

Postby Manthink » Wed, 25 Jan 2012 8:20 pm

carteki wrote:It is true that rudeness is based in culture. I met an american lady living in China. She told the story of how local Chinese friend walked into her apart. and spat a huge gob on the floor. I was horrified and thought it extremely rude, but in his mind it was probably normal. (she did tell him never to do it again though)


And so you justified your opinion based on your American's allegation?
Did you ask why her Chinese friend did that?

Barri
Member
Member
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun, 29 May 2011

Postby Barri » Thu, 26 Jan 2012 9:10 am

Come on, that is just one person misbehaving. Do you know how many weird people walk around on this planet?!?
Since not all her friends did that, she can't say the Chinese are such and such..
This is just a sensational incident that happened to her, she will probably tell it over and over again (and bore the hell out of her husband and friends) until she dies.


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “General Discussions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests