Singapore Expats Forum

Energy/Electricity Industry (esp. renewables)

Discuss about getting a well paid job or career advancement. Ask about salaries, expat packages, CPF & taxes for expatriate.

BnJoe
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed, 23 Nov 2011

Energy/Electricity Industry (esp. renewables)

Postby BnJoe » Sat, 03 Dec 2011 3:49 am

Hi,

I am considering moving to Singapore as my wife might be transferred there soon. I am an electrical engineer working in IT project management (buying side), but since I'm still young I would like to switch into my most preferred industry: renewable energy or at least energy industry.

I do know that it would be wiser to switch while I'm still in Germany, where the industry is going pretty well (especially wind and solar), but considering that my wife could move very soon, I'd like to see what my chances could possibly be.

Singapore is small, but needs electricity anyhow (if they don't build that nuclear plant that was planned?), but it could also be a hub for the region, especially as a HQ for carrying out projects in SE Asia.

Does anyone know anything about this industry in Singapore and is it a field where there is demand for foreigners? What do you think about the current chances of Engineers? (in Germany, there is a shortage and therefore you hardly need to worry about a job).

Oh, and one more thing, I posted it somewhere else, do you think the PE (Professional Engineer) certification is a must-have for the local job market?

Thanks!

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34785
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 03 Dec 2011 7:01 am

PE? While not a must have, it WILL give you a leg up at the negotiating table.

There was a large Solar manufacturer who set up shop here a year or two ago. It was in the news back then. You might have to do some google research as I cannot remember the name of the company. I'm on my way out the door so I can't do it at the moment.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Sat, 03 Dec 2011 7:43 am

'Green' energy is for socialist governments, happy to inflict 300% higher utility bills on their citizens.

Typical in Europe, but not so in SE Asia.

beppi
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1752
Joined: Thu, 07 Sep 2006
Location: Ahlongistan (O$P$)

Postby beppi » Sat, 03 Dec 2011 7:58 am

There isn't much scope for renewables in crowded Singapore, with a lack of space not much wind and often haze and clouds. In addition, the world's biggest oil refinery centre will not change to other sources, I think.
That said, there are a few renewables makers (as mentioned above), who export everything, and some companies use Singapore as regional Sales base.
For more information on the Solar manufacturing sector, send me a PM.

User avatar
x9200
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9301
Joined: Mon, 07 Sep 2009
Location: Singapore

Postby x9200 » Sat, 03 Dec 2011 8:46 am

Actually... 2 major (if not the biggest) wind turbine manufacturers where doing really intensive recruitment in Singapore over this year and it was for the staff on the middle research engineering level. I would suggest try to google them out.

BnJoe
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed, 23 Nov 2011

Postby BnJoe » Sat, 03 Dec 2011 6:31 pm

JR8 wrote:'Green' energy is for socialist governments, happy to inflict 300% higher utility bills on their citizens.

Typical in Europe, but not so in SE Asia.


Just like the socialist governments in Germany, China and the US? I think with a growing demand of electricity, rising prices of natural resources and falling prices of renewable sources it will be very interesting even without subsidies as in Germany.

Since my wife could as well go to China, we're choosing between these two options, and while China is more interesting from the industry outlook (China is already the biggest spender on renewables in the world, mostly wind), I think that Singapore is probably better for a living. I have been to both countries.

Thank you sms for the suggestion, I have seen a German company as well, but they seem to be on a downtrend in Europe (solar competition is hard especially with China) and I don't know whether they would employ foreigners, but I'll consider them. As for the PE, I think I'll give that some time and look into it if i ever get to Singapore.

@beppi: I can't send pm yet, but I agree there's a conflict with the oil refinery. However, Singapore is having a large field-test of electric cars or e-mobility in general, so I think there's potential for other sources. Personally, I think oil is way too precious to just burn it, you need it in many other industries, such as plastics, as well.

By the way, the MOM website has a self assessment tool (telling you whether there are chances of an EP based on your nationality, working exp., education), is it in any way reliable, does it point into the right direction or is it untrustworthy?

Thanks for all the replies.

beppi
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1752
Joined: Thu, 07 Sep 2006
Location: Ahlongistan (O$P$)

Postby beppi » Sat, 03 Dec 2011 8:17 pm

BnJoe wrote:Since my wife could as well go to China, we're choosing between these two options, and while China is more interesting from the industry outlook (China is already the biggest spender on renewables in the world, mostly wind), I think that Singapore is probably better for a living. I have been to both countries.

China also produces 60% of the world's solar cells. The percentage is growing fast. Opportunities are certainly better in China, but life is easier in Singapore.

BnJoe wrote:@beppi: I can't send pm yet, but I agree there's a conflict with the oil refinery. However, Singapore is having a large field-test of electric cars or e-mobility in general, so I think there's potential for other sources. Personally, I think oil is way too precious to just burn it, you need it in many other industries, such as plastics, as well.

You can send PM after five posts (two more to go!).
E-cars are not a source of energy, and not much better in overall environmental viewpoint (the electric energy they consume must still come from somewhere - most probably oil, coal or nuclear).
Singapore is developing (parts of) an electric car, but I doubt it will ever be manufactured here. I am connected to this effort (working with Li-Ion batteries now), so if you are interested in academic or R&D work, I can give you some hints (again, PM).
Your opinion will unfortunately not affect Singapore's choice of energy source. And there's really no space for wind or solar (not even on the heavily ship-trafficked waters), no volcanic activity (geothermal energy), no agriculture (for biomass) and no willingness to depend on neighbours, which do have all of the above but no money to develop it.

BnJoe wrote:By the way, the MOM website has a self assessment tool (telling you whether there are chances of an EP based on your nationality, working exp., education), is it in any way reliable, does it point into the right direction or is it untrustworthy?

Yes, pretty accurate, but only for your personal details.
Other factors also play a role that can still lead to a rejection (e.g. if the employer is allowed to hire foreigners, or if there are locals that could do the job).

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34785
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 03 Dec 2011 8:17 pm

BnJoe wrote:
By the way, the MOM website has a self assessment tool (telling you whether there are chances of an EP based on your nationality, working exp., education), is it in any way reliable, does it point into the right direction or is it untrustworthy?


It's pretty accurate up to a point. All it does is let you know whether you would pass the academic criteria. It doesn't mean you will get an Employment Pass. If you are trying to get a job that is unrelated to your credentials, you will fail. If the employer cannot justify WHY they need to hire a foreigner, regardless of your credentials, you will fail (or should I say the employer will fail). You cannot apply for an employment pass yourself, you MUST be sponsored by the prospective employer. The only exception to the rule is if you can substantiate basic salary in excess of SGD 8K/mo to enable you to apply for a PEP. This pass is not tied to an employer at all, is good for only 5 years, and can only be gotten once. More can be found on the MOM.gov.sg website.

Having said all that, if your credentials are in a niche industry then you probably won't have a problem.


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Careers & Jobs in Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests