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My life experience in Changi Prison (Cluster B)

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Brah
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Postby Brah » Sat, 10 Sep 2011 1:38 pm

I'm not qualified to adequately answer that or other such questions.

I only have my own ideas and observations, though I may not express them so well.

There is that which is proscribed from above, and that which comes from the masses.

Some comes from above down to the masses, as is the teaching paradigm here, where it's less 'education' and more "instruction", the same thing you see when local people speak to their children in public, which as an outsider, always struck me as very lecturing, supported by the pidgin version of English spoken here is.

Example? Listen to how a simple word like "definitely" is often spoken, as "daff-EEEN-EEEEET-LEEEEEEEEEE" - as if it were a new word to the listener, or as if it were some complicated concept, or as if it were difficult to pronounce, or as if it were necessary to drive home an otherwise banal message.

That lecturing style came from somewhere, and has no place in say US / UK / Aus / other society. It may be in the language but often language is a window onto society.

But what comes up from the masses? I am probably too far seconded away to really know or to speak with any authority on that. But...

Like these ridiculous Kindness- and "Good English" campaigns - these consistently fail because it really needs to come from the ground up, not the other way around. And it never will.

Same thing for things like littering - scaring people into being responsible will work for some of the people some of the time, especially the timid or those who can't think for themselves. But haters gonna hate, litterers gonna litter, mean people gonna be mean, and poor English will continue to prevail. As long as the masses are ok with it.

It's in the same way that somehow the people here have been tricked into self-policing themselves with STOMP! and the like.

Dunno, I see chaos in some aspects of American society, whereas I see much order in Japanese society. Often either side are at opposite extremes. The US has great creativity exemplified by the likes of Apple, Microsoft (snigger if you like but we're all using it at work), Fender, Gibson, etc. whereas the Japanese may not have innovated the originals but perfected with the likes of Toyota, Sony, etc.

Other examples are in Service - American is good, inconsistent and often very personable, Japanese is consistent, almost perfect, but often impersonal. We've had enough threads on service in Singapore, I won't repeat that here.

Where a country like Singapore fits in all of that, I don't really know, but it depends partly on how it is governed and educated. So far most of what I've seen is service in restaurants, or products live Creative, who I stopped buying their products due to shoddy quality and poor customer service.

I lost the plot at least twice in the above but maybe it still comes through.

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Postby JR8 » Sat, 10 Sep 2011 9:09 pm

Brah wrote:Example? Listen to how a simple word like "definitely" is often spoken, as "daff-EEEN-EEEEET-LEEEEEEEEEE" - as if it were a new word to the listener, or as if it were some complicated concept, or as if it were difficult to pronounce, or as if it were necessary to drive home an otherwise banal message.


Thoroughly enjoyed reading that, thanks!

The above quoted para did make me laugh out loud. I have a 'thing' with how often SGns say 'basically'. I find it similar to how you describe, a rather elongated sub-continental sing-song style. When I joke with SGns about it they just don't get my point and think I'm just putting on an Indian accent :lol:

The thing with me and shooting is that it used to be one of my main hobbies. Diving, skiing, shooting. Then one day some psycho went on a rampage in Scotland, and suddenly the whole sport was banned. To me it is no different to waking up and being told golf has been banned, or skiing has. Plus to rub it in the ban has achieved nothing at all. You will understand why it riles me up.

I heard someone opine recently 'Singaporean children are not educated, they are trained'. Hmmm...

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Postby Brah » Sun, 11 Sep 2011 1:28 pm

Yeah, another one, "BayEEE-SEEE-KEEE-LEEEE" - I never understood this curious choice of diction, ostensibly to prepare one for the punchline, for the climatic delivery of the next word, for the astounding concept soon to follow. Only to be let down by something painfully trite. Again.

I think yours is what I've heard, "trained", as opposed to what I wrote, "instructed". I think even LKY said something to that effect when interviewed about his newest book.

........

Aware of not having explained very well what I was on about in the last post, another example is graffiti.

Outside of that which serves as urban art, that which is true vandalism and destruction of one's own and others environment seems freely done in places like the States, and while there is graffiti in Japan, the collective unconscious there exists such that it wouldn't occur to those people to a) destroy their surroundings or b) be so selfish and uncaring as to impact other people's environment.

This does not come from any anti-graffiti, anti-vandalism campaigns, it comes from the people.

Americans have some very traditional reasons for wanting guns, and I wouldn't get into that debate any more than I would abortion or some of the other Big Debates. I'm simply not qualified to, and I tend to see both sides and the dilemma of a no-compromise. But like with graffiti , there is a parallel about how the masses use them.

And although it's not too common, it really bugs me when I see litter, or hear other people's crappy music in the common areas of our condo. And I get tired of cleaning it up myself.

JR8 wrote:
Brah wrote:Example? Listen to how a simple word like "definitely" is often spoken, as "daff-EEEN-EEEEET-LEEEEEEEEEE" - as if it were a new word to the listener, or as if it were some complicated concept, or as if it were difficult to pronounce, or as if it were necessary to drive home an otherwise banal message.


Thoroughly enjoyed reading that, thanks!

The above quoted para did make me laugh out loud. I have a 'thing' with how often SGns say 'basically'. I find it similar to how you describe, a rather elongated sub-continental sing-song style. When I joke with SGns about it they just don't get my point and think I'm just putting on an Indian accent :lol:

The thing with me and shooting is that it used to be one of my main hobbies. Diving, skiing, shooting. Then one day some psycho went on a rampage in Scotland, and suddenly the whole sport was banned. To me it is no different to waking up and being told golf has been banned, or skiing has. Plus to rub it in the ban has achieved nothing at all. You will understand why it riles me up.

I heard someone opine recently 'Singaporean children are not educated, they are trained'. Hmmm...

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Postby JR8 » Sun, 11 Sep 2011 1:56 pm

Brah wrote:Yeah, another one, "BayEEE-SEEE-KEEE-LEEEE" - I never understood this curious choice of diction, ostensibly to prepare one for the punchline, for the climatic delivery of the next word, for the astounding concept soon to follow. Only to be let down by something painfully trite. Again.

LOl, spot on, all it needs is a big '[takes deep breath]' inserted afterwards. I think there must be a term for the usage of such words. They're rather lawyerish in a way, like the speaker is using it as a holding word, while thinking of what is going to come next.

I think yours is what I've heard, "trained", as opposed to what I wrote, "instructed". I think even LKY said something to that effect when interviewed about his newest book.

I forget where I heard it. It might have been from him though I somehow doubt he would be so dismissive of something he oversaw.

........
Aware of not having explained very well what I was on about in the last post, another example is graffiti.

Outside of that which serves as urban art, that which is true vandalism and destruction of one's own and others environment seems freely done in places like the States, and while there is graffiti in Japan, the collective unconscious there exists such that it wouldn't occur to those people to a) destroy their surroundings or b) be so selfish and uncaring as to impact other people's environment.

This does not come from any anti-graffiti, anti-vandalism campaigns, it comes from the people.

Americans have some very traditional reasons for wanting guns, and I wouldn't get into that debate any more than I would abortion or some of the other Big Debates. I'm simply not qualified to, and I tend to see both sides and the dilemma of a no-compromise. But like with graffiti , there is a parallel about how the masses use them.

Maybe immigration is the issue (don't get me wrong, I'm permanently an immigrant). A lot of immigrants are poor, a lot of them get mixed up in crime and drugs. Violence and guns go hand in hand with that. But, in Japan there are almost no immigrants.


And although it's not too common, it really bugs me when I see litter, or hear other people's crappy music in the common areas of our condo. And I get tired of cleaning it up myself.

I get tired that most other people seem oblivious to the problem.


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Postby ksl » Sun, 11 Sep 2011 3:12 pm

Deleted my long post out of sympathy for others :lol:

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Postby Brah » Sun, 11 Sep 2011 3:15 pm

Most of your posts are long. Except for today most of mine are short. Yours was surely worthwhile one.
ksl wrote:Deleted my long post out of sympathy for others :lol:

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Postby ksl » Sun, 11 Sep 2011 4:16 pm

Brah wrote:Most of your posts are long. Except for today most of mine are short. Yours was surely worthwhile one.
ksl wrote:Deleted my long post out of sympathy for others :lol:
Maybe immigration is the issue (don't get me wrong, I'm permanently an immigrant). A lot of immigrants are poor, a lot of them get mixed up in crime and drugs. Violence and guns go hand in hand with that. But, in Japan there are almost no immigrants.

Nail on the head here! Immigrants that have difficulty adopting a culture, will tend to rebel rather than go home. I had 3 years with refugees and became very close to many families while helping them to integrate.

They reminded me that i was the lucky one, being white and speaking English and would always get priority, for jobs, apartments and such, a little experiment of changing Ali's name to one of Danish origin proved a point. Though when interviews took place, there was surprise and discomfort along with disappointment for those seeking employment and a place to live. It is not surprising that some rebelled against the system once they found the societies weakness. Human rights!

My take on immigration is that if you don't like to be in a country, move on or return home. The majority were not genuine refugees anyway, they lied their way through the process and laughed at authority stayed 10 or 15 years to get university degrees at the expense of the tax payers then moved on. A few I am still in contact with have settled and integrated very well. The unfortunates turn to crime, vandalism and drugs and collect a pay cheque every month! Refugees cannot be deported so easy, immigrants can be sent home at the cost of the tax payer if they cannot support themselves.

The Chinese have their own networks in the USA and UK and rarely try to get welfare if they are illegal, but black work is plentiful in these areas.

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Re: My life experience in Changi Prison (Cluster B)

Postby Daugter » Tue, 13 Sep 2011 5:19 pm

Inmate wrote:Introduction:
Hi readers, I am a ex-convict whom have served my jail term from July 2011- Augest 2011. Lockup in CPC (Changi Prison Complex) for a month, then served the remaining of my sentence under PPP (Home Detention Program). Throughout my 'short' 2 months lock-up behind bars and at home. I have came across and met numbers of ex-convicts whom have commited all types of offences. They share with me their backgrounds, personal stories which have taught me alot and understand the meaning of happiness in life.

****[color=darkred]Hi, I am glad I saw your post as I am clueless how, whom and what to ask when i call the Prison equiry number, Sigh. My father is now at B2 and I have only just recieve the letter for 1st visit, which will be a Televisit since I have missed his face to face day which is every tuesday (today is tuesday and i just got the letter). He is there on Short Term sentence. may I know how can one find out about PPP? how will Dad know if he is eligible? Thank you so much for sharing, it is difficult for the one serving the sentence inside and it is tough for family to try to be normal too, and for you to share, it really helps us visualised what dad is doing each hour. Thank you.[/color]

Inspiration from those people whom have supported and helped me get through and start afresh, I decided to create this website aiming to bring those with an interest in the prisoner support community a forum in which their issues and concerns may be addressed by others in similar circumstances and beliefs.

Although I am still struggling with debts after my release, I am no longer in depression. I'll finally found and understand the real meaning of life and regain back my strength and confidence to face the reality again, all thanks to my lock-up experiences and those inmates/ officers I met in CPC.

I sincerely hope and be glad if my life story here can actually helpout any of you readers or people around you. Think again before you commiting a crime and do get prepare on what you will face after you commit a crime!

<Before>

Chapter 1.1: What I have done
I stay with my parents and I can say I have a warm beloved family. I have my own stable decent business which I have been spenting years building up. For the past 28 years I'll have been living in a decent lifestyle.
Like most of the readers here, I always told myself and anyone around me that I will not commit anything which is illegal.

But my life was destroyed by myself soon after the opening of Casino in MBS (MarinaBay Sands) (MBS). Due to my greed, I have lost everything (my savings, my company, my lifestyle) within months in MBS. Neverless to say, I end up commiting a crime soon later due to financial.
I never hide nor trying to escape after I commited the crime. I thought I was already mentally prepared and faced the consequences. I turned myself in the next day after I commited the crime.
I was being summoned to Subordinate Court by my IO from Cantonment Police Station after 1 month from the day of my interview and providing my statement to him. My case was very direct as I decided to plead guilty without hiring lawyer and appeal. I want get my punishment as soon as possible so I can end it all once and for all.


Chapter 1.2: Arrival to Subordinate Court

I turned up with my family members to Subordinate Court, Court 26 (as ordered by my IO), 9am sharp for my mention. I entered court room 26 at 9am sharp and it was already full of people and the trial had just started. Turn by turn, my whole waiting and hearing process took about 2 hours. I am not alone. There are at least about 40+ others including the remands waiting for their hearing.

I was ordered by the judge to attend court 10, 2.30pm (same day) for my sentences after I've plead guility to the judge during my mention.

Like anyone whom are attending court for their first time in their life, it is a very tense, stressful, full of worries and nervous moment for me. But something that have touched my heart is the accompany and support from my familes till that very last moment!

I enter my court room 26 at 9am sharp and it was already full of people. My whole waiting and hearing process took me about 2 hours. I am not alone. There are at least about 40+ others just like me, turn by turn waiting for their hearing.


Advice & Information


1. If you are prepared to plead guility on the same day that you attend court, you will be sent to jail on the same day itself.


2. If you plead guilty on the same day that you attend court, try not to bring cash amount more than $300. As prison will only refund you back in cheque upon your release if your money declared exceed $300


3. Get yourself a full back plastic-made frame spectacle if you wear spectacle as prison do not allow you to wear other type of material-made spectacle frame. (You are only allowed to wear for the first 3 weeks of your lock-up)


4. Make sure you have a heavy lunch before you attend your final sentence as you will mostly be sent and reach CPC (Changi Prison Complex) in the late evening. Prison will only served breads for dinner at night.


As orderd, I arrived Court 10 at 2.30pm sharp for my final sentence. I was not alone, there were other 3 persons seating down at the waiting area, awaiting for their sentences.

Upon the arrival of the judge (Female/ Chinese/ Mid-Thirties). Everyone in the court stood up and make a bow then sat down again.


My offence commited is CBT (Criminal Beach Of Trust) was charged under section 408.


I plead guilty to the judge and was sentence 1 month jail term + $8000 fine (in default 4 weeks jail term) jail term, my total sentence is 1 month 4 weeks jail term as I couldn't payout the fine. But I still feel relieve as I was expecting 3months - 5months jail term. Soon I was being handcruffed by the officer, the first time in my whole life!

My mind is totally blank at that moment when I got handcruffed at that moment. I can strongly feel someone have feel hurt and tears dropping from their eyes at that very moment - My family members whom I have hurt and make them suffer!

Please think again before you commit a crime! In singapore, you can run but you cannot hide forever. When you commit a crimet, you are not only destroying and hurting yourself but you are also hurting all those whom have always shown love and concern to you even deeper! They are the ones suffering the most when you get caught and sentence in jail!


Chapter 1.3: The lock-up at Subordinate Court
Once the court are dismiss, I was escorted by the police officers to a side exit. I can only turn my head to my family to have my last look and goodbye through our eyes contact as I am not allow to communicate with them.

Being escorted, walking through a narrow passage then staircase, I came to the basement where the lock-up cell rooms are located. Walking in, I was bought to a room which there are others like me, being handcruffed and turn by turn, we surrender our belongings, checking height & weight, thumb-print (no signature allowed) some documents. I was later bought to one of the lock-up cell after done.

The lightings in the cellroom are dime and the walls are full of fingerprint markings. Its not stuffy as there are air-con. There was a toilet attached within the cell room but was doorless.

I was not alone in that cell room! There are about 20 other people (all ages, races include foreigners, some wearing normal clothes while some in remand prisoner's clothes = white t-shirt and brown long pants with transport jelly slippers) with me in that cell (about 350 sqf).

My mind was lost and nervous. i can feel there are eyes watching at me. I don't know what's coming next . I can only stand alone at one corner quietly observing the surronding. There are others who are like me. looking lost and nervous from their expression. Some Sitting down quietly on the floor while some chat with each other happily.

Soon I was approach by one of the cell mate (age about mid 40s, skinny, with tatoo on his right arm) and we start chatting. Hes a repeat convict (3rd timer) and I can say he is the one whom have relief me. He told me what will be coming and other infomation/ advices which I thought it is very useful to me when I reach CPC (Changi Prison Complex). He is being charged on drugs case. I was really surpised that the first offender i ever spoke to, is such a easy going and friendly guy which i have never expected to be!

Time pass slowly and soon one officer came and ordered us to get in-line of 2 rows. We did as what was being told. Thereafter, we were being escorted to another large empty room to have our legs shackled. With our hands cruffed and legs shackled, we were then being escorted to the carkpark and enter a prison vehicle. It can contained about 40 prisoners per vehicle. Interior are fully sealed, no windows! We sat down in orderly manner and I know we are on our way to the prison now!

------------ End Of Chapter 1 ----------------

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Re: My life experience in Changi Prison (Cluster B)

Postby Inmate » Thu, 15 Sep 2011 12:22 am

Daugter wrote:
Inmate wrote:Introduction:
Hi readers, I am a ex-convict whom have served my jail term from July 2011- Augest 2011. Lockup in CPC (Changi Prison Complex) for a month, then served the remaining of my sentence under PPP (Home Detention Program). Throughout my 'short' 2 months lock-up behind bars and at home. I have came across and met numbers of ex-convicts whom have commited all types of offences. They share with me their backgrounds, personal stories which have taught me alot and understand the meaning of happiness in life.

****[color=darkred]Hi, I am glad I saw your post as I am clueless how, whom and what to ask when i call the Prison equiry number, Sigh. My father is now at B2 and I have only just recieve the letter for 1st visit, which will be a Televisit since I have missed his face to face day which is every tuesday (today is tuesday and i just got the letter). He is there on Short Term sentence. may I know how can one find out about PPP? how will Dad know if he is eligible? Thank you so much for sharing, it is difficult for the one serving the sentence inside and it is tough for family to try to be normal too, and for you to share, it really helps us visualised what dad is doing each hour. Thank you.[/color]

Inspiration from those people whom have supported and helped me get through and start afresh, I decided to create this website aiming to bring those with an interest in the prisoner support community a forum in which their issues and concerns may be addressed by others in similar circumstances and beliefs.

Although I am still struggling with debts after my release, I am no longer in depression. I'll finally found and understand the real meaning of life and regain back my strength and confidence to face the reality again, all thanks to my lock-up experiences and those inmates/ officers I met in CPC.

I sincerely hope and be glad if my life story here can actually helpout any of you readers or people around you. Think again before you commiting a crime and do get prepare on what you will face after you commit a crime!

<Before>

Chapter 1.1: What I have done
I stay with my parents and I can say I have a warm beloved family. I have my own stable decent business which I have been spenting years building up. For the past 28 years I'll have been living in a decent lifestyle.
Like most of the readers here, I always told myself and anyone around me that I will not commit anything which is illegal.

But my life was destroyed by myself soon after the opening of Casino in MBS (MarinaBay Sands) (MBS). Due to my greed, I have lost everything (my savings, my company, my lifestyle) within months in MBS. Neverless to say, I end up commiting a crime soon later due to financial.
I never hide nor trying to escape after I commited the crime. I thought I was already mentally prepared and faced the consequences. I turned myself in the next day after I commited the crime.
I was being summoned to Subordinate Court by my IO from Cantonment Police Station after 1 month from the day of my interview and providing my statement to him. My case was very direct as I decided to plead guilty without hiring lawyer and appeal. I want get my punishment as soon as possible so I can end it all once and for all.


Chapter 1.2: Arrival to Subordinate Court

I turned up with my family members to Subordinate Court, Court 26 (as ordered by my IO), 9am sharp for my mention. I entered court room 26 at 9am sharp and it was already full of people and the trial had just started. Turn by turn, my whole waiting and hearing process took about 2 hours. I am not alone. There are at least about 40+ others including the remands waiting for their hearing.

I was ordered by the judge to attend court 10, 2.30pm (same day) for my sentences after I've plead guility to the judge during my mention.

Like anyone whom are attending court for their first time in their life, it is a very tense, stressful, full of worries and nervous moment for me. But something that have touched my heart is the accompany and support from my familes till that very last moment!

I enter my court room 26 at 9am sharp and it was already full of people. My whole waiting and hearing process took me about 2 hours. I am not alone. There are at least about 40+ others just like me, turn by turn waiting for their hearing.


Advice & Information


1. If you are prepared to plead guility on the same day that you attend court, you will be sent to jail on the same day itself.


2. If you plead guilty on the same day that you attend court, try not to bring cash amount more than $300. As prison will only refund you back in cheque upon your release if your money declared exceed $300


3. Get yourself a full back plastic-made frame spectacle if you wear spectacle as prison do not allow you to wear other type of material-made spectacle frame. (You are only allowed to wear for the first 3 weeks of your lock-up)


4. Make sure you have a heavy lunch before you attend your final sentence as you will mostly be sent and reach CPC (Changi Prison Complex) in the late evening. Prison will only served breads for dinner at night.


As orderd, I arrived Court 10 at 2.30pm sharp for my final sentence. I was not alone, there were other 3 persons seating down at the waiting area, awaiting for their sentences.

Upon the arrival of the judge (Female/ Chinese/ Mid-Thirties). Everyone in the court stood up and make a bow then sat down again.


My offence commited is CBT (Criminal Beach Of Trust) was charged under section 408.


I plead guilty to the judge and was sentence 1 month jail term + $8000 fine (in default 4 weeks jail term) jail term, my total sentence is 1 month 4 weeks jail term as I couldn't payout the fine. But I still feel relieve as I was expecting 3months - 5months jail term. Soon I was being handcruffed by the officer, the first time in my whole life!

My mind is totally blank at that moment when I got handcruffed at that moment. I can strongly feel someone have feel hurt and tears dropping from their eyes at that very moment - My family members whom I have hurt and make them suffer!

Please think again before you commit a crime! In singapore, you can run but you cannot hide forever. When you commit a crimet, you are not only destroying and hurting yourself but you are also hurting all those whom have always shown love and concern to you even deeper! They are the ones suffering the most when you get caught and sentence in jail!


Chapter 1.3: The lock-up at Subordinate Court
Once the court are dismiss, I was escorted by the police officers to a side exit. I can only turn my head to my family to have my last look and goodbye through our eyes contact as I am not allow to communicate with them.

Being escorted, walking through a narrow passage then staircase, I came to the basement where the lock-up cell rooms are located. Walking in, I was bought to a room which there are others like me, being handcruffed and turn by turn, we surrender our belongings, checking height & weight, thumb-print (no signature allowed) some documents. I was later bought to one of the lock-up cell after done.

The lightings in the cellroom are dime and the walls are full of fingerprint markings. Its not stuffy as there are air-con. There was a toilet attached within the cell room but was doorless.

I was not alone in that cell room! There are about 20 other people (all ages, races include foreigners, some wearing normal clothes while some in remand prisoner's clothes = white t-shirt and brown long pants with transport jelly slippers) with me in that cell (about 350 sqf).

My mind was lost and nervous. i can feel there are eyes watching at me. I don't know what's coming next . I can only stand alone at one corner quietly observing the surronding. There are others who are like me. looking lost and nervous from their expression. Some Sitting down quietly on the floor while some chat with each other happily.

Soon I was approach by one of the cell mate (age about mid 40s, skinny, with tatoo on his right arm) and we start chatting. Hes a repeat convict (3rd timer) and I can say he is the one whom have relief me. He told me what will be coming and other infomation/ advices which I thought it is very useful to me when I reach CPC (Changi Prison Complex). He is being charged on drugs case. I was really surpised that the first offender i ever spoke to, is such a easy going and friendly guy which i have never expected to be!

Time pass slowly and soon one officer came and ordered us to get in-line of 2 rows. We did as what was being told. Thereafter, we were being escorted to another large empty room to have our legs shackled. With our hands cruffed and legs shackled, we were then being escorted to the carkpark and enter a prison vehicle. It can contained about 40 prisoners per vehicle. Interior are fully sealed, no windows! We sat down in orderly manner and I know we are on our way to the prison now!

------------ End Of Chapter 1 ----------------


Bro, just relax and everything is fine for short sentences. For home detention, he will be briefed by the prison officer, theres nothing for your family to worry as there's nothing you can really do now but only wait.

I think your letter got state the CPC service number.. Pls go through again..

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Postby Inmate » Thu, 15 Sep 2011 7:11 am

Chapter 5.5: Home detention 1st interview

<b> I stare at the ceiling blankly. I know it is now 5am as the lights have just switched on and I can hear my neighbor showering. I have now slowly adapted to the prison’s life.

Although I know today will be another long meaningless day for me, I am still looking forward to meet new inmates and learnt more about the meaning of life. I want to make used and promise myself to be useful to the society again after my release. I have done many stupid things and due to my selfishness, I have made people near me suffered as well. Although I know myself I am not a professional legal trained.. I really hope whatever I reveal in my story can help and change people’s life.

After my breakfast, I was being notified to attend a interview regarding PPP program (Home detention scheme). Beside me, there are a few other inmates from other dayrooms as well. We were being escorted to the interview room within the same building and we were all being briefed by a highly ranked prison officer in the interview room.

He told that based on our records and backgrounds, we were selected and he will recommend us for PPP Program (Home Detention scheme). However, he told us that it is still not confirm as there are requirement, terms & conditions for us to fulfill and we are to undergo a second interview 1 week later if we wish to take up the PPP program.

He briefed us on our estimated home detention duration and other important requirement for PPP program:

- Require a normal ‘Singtel’ Telephone line for home detention more than 7 days

- No smoking/ drinking/ gambling (buying of 4D/ TOTO) during detention program

- Inmates are only allowed to leave our house from 12pm – 3pm daily (Different timing for special occasions).

- We are to be 24 hours for spot checks and be prepared to recall back to CPC for urine check at all time.


We’ll have the option to reject the home detention scheme and don’t be surprised that there are a few inmates who actually rejected the home detention scheme on the spot.

They claimed that they don’t have family support ( either homeless or staying alone), some felt that the duration of the program is too short and some thought it is too troublesome so they rather choose to stay in prison to complete their sentences.

What is Home Detention Scheme:

HOME DETENTION SCHEME

"Home Detention" , in relation to a prisoner, means the serving by the prisoner of his sentence of imprisonment in such place or places, outside the limits of any prison, as may be specified in the home detention order;

"home detention order" means an order of the Director under section 52;

"Superintendent" , in relation to a prisoner, means the Superintendent of the prison from which the prisoner had been released for home detention.

Order for home detention
52. Subject to section 53, the Director may, if he thinks fit, by order release a prisoner who is eligible for home detention for a period not exceeding 12 months or such other period as the Minister may, by notification in the Gazette, prescribe in substitution thereof.


Eligibility for home detention
53. —(1) A prisoner is eligible to be released for home detention under section 52 if —
(a) he is serving a sentence of imprisonment for a term of not less than 4 weeks or such other period as the Minister may, by notification in the Gazette, prescribe in substitution thereof;

(aa) he has served not less than 14 days of his sentence of imprisonment or such other period as the Minister may, by notification in the Gazette, prescribe in substitution thereof; and

(b) he is not a prisoner specified under the Schedule as being disqualified from being released for home detention under section 52.

(1A) The disqualification of a prisoner under subsection (1) (b) may be removed by the Minister if he considers that the prisoner is deserving of home detention, having regard to the circumstances of the case, including the following factors:

(a) the prisoner’s progress and response to rehabilitation in prison;

(b) the prisoner’s family support; and

(c) the risk of recidivism by the prisoner.

(2) For the purpose of subsection (1) (a), the total consecutive periods of imprisonment of whatever nature shall be treated as one sentence.


Conditions for home detention
54. —(1) A prisoner subject to a home detention order shall —

(a) remain indoors at his place of residence or at such other place or places as may be designated by the Director in the order, and between such times as may be specified in the order;

(b) wear at all times on such part of his body as the Director may specify, such electronic transmitting device as may be issued by the Director for the purpose of securing the electronic monitoring of his whereabouts by means of an electronic monitoring device;

(c) allow the Superintendent and any person authorised by the Superintendent to enter at any time his place of residence, or such other place or places designated by the Director under paragraph (a), to install, inspect, maintain, repair or retrieve any electronic monitoring device;

(d) allow a telephone line at his place of residence, or at such other place or places designated by the Director under paragraph (a), to be connected to an electronic monitoring device;

(e) ensure that there is no call waiting or call transfer facility attached to the telephone line referred to in paragraph (d) and that the telephone line is not connected to any cordless telephone, telephone answering machine, parallel telephone line, modulator — demodulator unit or any other equipment which may interfere with the proper functioning of the electronic monitoring device;

(f) not disconnect, remove, damage, tamper with, or lose the electronic transmitting device issued to him or the electronic monitoring device installed at his place of residence or at such other place or places designated by the Director under paragraph (a), or disconnect, remove, damage or tamper with the telephone line connected to the electronic monitoring device;

(g) immediately inform the Superintendent or any prison officer of any malfunction or loss of, or damage to, the electronic transmitting device or the electronic monitoring device;

(h) respond promptly to any telephone call from any person appointed by the Director to monitor prisoners who have been issued with an electronic transmitting device; and

(i) comply with such other conditions as the Director may specify in the order.

(2) The Director may at any time by order in writing served on the prisoner subject to a home detention order —

(a) vary, cancel or add to any of the conditions specified in subsection (1); or

(b) exempt the prisoner from any of the conditions specified in subsection (1).


Effect of home detention order
55. Where a home detention order is in force in respect of a prisoner —

(a) the prisoner shall be deemed to be serving his sentence of imprisonment;

(b) the prisoner shall be deemed to be in the lawful custody of the Superintendent; and

(c) the prisoner is entitled to earn remission in respect of the period of imprisonment which is served under the order.


Recall to prison
56. —(1) If a Superintendent has reason to suspect that a prisoner has failed to comply with any of the conditions of the home detention order, or has committed a disciplinary offence while being subject to a home detention order, the Superintendent may —

(a) make such inquiry as may be necessary to ascertain whether the prisoner has failed to comply with any of the conditions of the home detention order or committed a disciplinary offence while being subject to the order; and

(b) recall the prisoner to prison pending the completion of the inquiry.

(2) The period of the home detention order of a prisoner who is recalled to prison under subsection (1) (b) shall continue to run, notwithstanding the fact that he is recalled to prison, unless the order is revoked under section 57 or suspended under section 58.


Revocation of home detention order
57. —(1) If the Director is satisfied that —
(a) a prisoner has failed to return to prison after he has been recalled to prison under section 56 (1) (b);

(b) a prisoner has failed to comply with any of the conditions of the home detention order;

(c) a prisoner has committed a disciplinary offence while being subject to a home detention order;

(d) the whereabouts of a prisoner can no longer be electronically monitored at his place of residence, or at such other place or places at which the prisoner is required to remain within doors under the conditions of the home detention order; or

(e) it is necessary in the public interest to do so,

the Director may revoke the home detention order in respect of that prisoner and recall the prisoner to prison, and the prisoner shall, if at large, be deemed to be unlawfully at large.

(2) Upon the revocation of the home detention order under subsection (1), the prisoner shall serve the unexpired part of his sentence of imprisonment in prison.


Suspension of home detention order
58. —(1) Subject to subsection (2), where a prisoner subject to a home detention order is punished for a minor prison offence under section 70 (1) (a) or (b), or for an aggravated prison offence under section 71
(1) (b) or (c), the home detention order in respect of the prisoner shall, unless revoked under section 57, be suspended from the date on which the prisoner is punished for —

(a) the period that the prisoner is confined in a punishment cell pursuant to an order under section 70 (1) (a) or 71 (1) (b); or

(b) the period of remission which is forfeited pursuant to an order under section 70 (1) (b) or 71 (1) (c).

(2) If a prisoner is punished with both confinement in a punishment cell under section 70 (1) (a) or 71 (1) (b) and forfeiture of remission under section 70 (1) (b) or 71 (1) (c), the period for which the home detention order shall be suspended under subsection (1) shall be the sum of the period for which the prisoner is ordered to undergo confinement and the period of remission forfeited.


Powers to enter and search
59. A police officer of or above the rank of Assistant Superintendent of Police or a police officer authorised by him may —

(a) enter and search a place without a warrant to effect the arrest of any prisoner who has failed to return to prison after he is recalled by the Superintendent under section 56 (1) (b); and

(b) in order to effect an entrance into that place, break open any outer or inner door or window of that place if he cannot otherwise obtain admittance thereto.


After the briefing, we were told by the officer to wait outside as he need to interview us individually. While waiting for my turn for the interview, I spoke to the inmate who was sitting beside me.

He is 3xx2. He is a indian in mid-forties. He told me that he was being charged for robbery. He was sentenced to jail term for 2 years 6 months + strokes of rotan (I don’t quite remember how many)

There was a day when a foreign worker from china tried to pick pocket one of his friend in the midnight. 3xx2 was with his friend and other 2 when this incident happened. His friend noticed that he had been pickpocket by the foreign worker and he told the group about it. Soon, the group managed to find and capture the foreign worker. They forced him into their van. They drove to Lim Chu Kang cemetery, tied him up and bash him up. The foreign worker plead to stop and offered them all his money in his pocket (about $10000). The group agreed and left quickly after taking the foreign worker’s money.

The group was arrested by the police within 1 week after the robbery.

From what he told me, I thought he was helping out a friend, out for revenge and to teach the foreign worker a lesson. In the end, his greed has destroyed him and his group of friends.


Soon I was being called into the interview room and the officer start to ask questions about my lifestyle, my work history, my crimes and my family background. The whole interview lasted for about 20 minutes. I was told to wait and I will be informed for the second interview if I am eligible.

Back to my cell room 629, I was informed to pack my belongings after 3pm muster check as I am transferring to other cell room....



Chapter 6: B4, HU1, Room 208

To Be Continued

LUX ALLAIR
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BROTHER INMATE

Postby LUX ALLAIR » Thu, 19 Sep 2013 6:50 pm

I HAVE A BROTHER CURRENTLY IN ADMIRALTY WEST PRISON, WHEN HE WAS DETAINED HE LEFT HIS CREDIT CARD UNPAID, TODAY WE RECEIVE A STATEMENT FROM THE BANK, DEMANDING THE PAYMENT AMOUNT WHICK WE CANNOT PAY.. HE IS A FOREIGNER IN SINGAPORE.. ACCORDING TO THE PRISON, AFTER HIS RELEASE DATE ON NOVEMBER HE WILL HAVE 48 HOURS OF CLEARANCE IN ICA. MY WORRY IS, WILL HIS CREDIT CARD RECORDS CAN BE SEEN DURING THE CLEARANCE? THANKS

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nakatago
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Re: BROTHER INMATE

Postby nakatago » Thu, 19 Sep 2013 7:10 pm

LUX ALLAIR wrote:AAAAH


Don't post in all caps. It's internet for shouting and is considered rude.

-Moderator

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zzm9980
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Re: BROTHER INMATE

Postby zzm9980 » Thu, 19 Sep 2013 7:30 pm

LUX ALLAIR wrote:I HAVE A BROTHER CURRENTLY IN ADMIRALTY WEST PRISON, WHEN HE WAS DETAINED HE LEFT HIS CREDIT CARD UNPAID, TODAY WE RECEIVE A STATEMENT FROM THE BANK, DEMANDING THE PAYMENT AMOUNT WHICK WE CANNOT PAY.. HE IS A FOREIGNER IN SINGAPORE.. ACCORDING TO THE PRISON, AFTER HIS RELEASE DATE ON NOVEMBER HE WILL HAVE 48 HOURS OF CLEARANCE IN ICA. MY WORRY IS, WILL HIS CREDIT CARD RECORDS CAN BE SEEN DURING THE CLEARANCE? THANKS


Was he detained for the overdue cards? Or something else? Go read up on Bankruptcy. The worst that can happen is he is declared a bankrupt, but that won't put him into prison unless he violates conditions of that. Pretty sure the bank can't get him declared a bankrupt that quickly.

summerquinn
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Re: My life experience in Changi Prison (Cluster B)

Postby summerquinn » Mon, 29 Feb 2016 4:05 pm

Inmate, are you still around? Don't leave us hanging mate! What happened next????? Did you ever make it to the other wing? Was it better? Worse? Did you make it for the Home Parole thing the first time? (I know you made it at some point as explained in your first post)

It's been 5 years since you posted and I'm curious how you've been? Are things easier? Harsher?

I hope you come back and update us. I really enjoyed reading your posts!

lilith
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Re: My life experience in Changi Prison (Cluster B)

Postby lilith » Tue, 15 Mar 2016 8:06 pm

Sounds legit. I doubt if anyone would make this up. I imagine if I got in trouble for the same reason, I might want to come back here and read through it again


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