Singapore Expats Forum

Fogging in Singapore - Serious health hazard

Discuss about beauty & health. Need some advice or looking for a particular product? Share your beauty and health tips here.

timanator
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed, 18 Mar 2009

Fogging in Singapore - Serious health hazard

Postby timanator » Wed, 20 Jul 2011 9:51 pm

As an expat living in Singapore for many years, I have witnessed the increased frequency of fogging going on in many neighbourhoods around SG. I'd like to point out that the chemicals used in fogging have been classified as carcinogens and several studies have indicated that fogging does not actually solve the problem of mosquitoes breeding.

Anyone else concerned about the high rates of lung cancer in SG could be partially linked to constant fogging in the air? It's a bit ironic that we end up poisoning ourselves while trying to kill flying bugs. Why not put the manpower into eradicating standing water instead?

If fogging is indeed safe as the NEA has said, then why are the exterminators/foggers encouraged to wear full protection? I read an article in the ST that mentioned the chemical name (if anyone has it would appreciate a quick link).

User avatar
taxico
Director
Director
Posts: 3190
Joined: Sat, 10 May 2008
Location: Existential dilemma!

Postby taxico » Wed, 20 Jul 2011 9:54 pm

anything in concentrated regular doses is not good for the human body.

in limited/low doses it's probably something your body can handle.

everything can be carcinogenic these days, including vitamin/supplement pills.

if you think there's excessive fogging, contact NEA. you know how.
Aut viam ad caelum inveniam aut faciam

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35179
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 20 Jul 2011 11:18 pm

Did you know that drinking a coke a day really isn't all that harmful, but drinking 2 or 3 litres a day can cause diabetes, obesity and possibly death? All fogging chemicals are mixed in dosages that are too small to affect the human body with the limited inhalation times that the fogging is in the air. The reason the workers doing the fogging are wearing masks is that they, unlike the general population are directly within the fogging cloud during the fogging operations where the fog cloud is the densest therefore are inhaling the fumes for much long and in much heavier concentration then the general public ever would.

Much the same as breathing oxygen, to much and you can get oxygen toxicity.

A common approach is a three pronged attack against vector borne diseases, chemical donuts in the water for the eggs not yet hatched, oiling to smother the existing larvae and fogging for the adult mosquito. Unfortunately, we are not allow to eradicate the biggest cause of vector borne diseases, man. If man would not allow stagnant water to stand, then the mosquito would not have a place to breed. So, maybe we should use stronger stuff when we have a dengue outbreak in a cluster and just wipe out all the humans there who allowed the breeding to happen in the first place. :wink:

Oh, yeah, Vector Control Workers have to go for blood tests every six months to ensure there is not any residual build up of the chemicals in the body. In 15 years, we've never had a bad blood test.

From one who watch his BiL almost die 4 years ago due to dengue, I'll chance the fumes of a fogger anyday. Not nearly as dangerous as walking down Orchard Road on a weekend with thousands of car idling along spewing out partially burnt hydrocarbons and other foul toxic chemicals and carbon monoxide.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Thu, 21 Jul 2011 11:04 am

If when the 'Mosquito police' call to check if you have any standing water at your property, could you say argue that the liquid in flower-pot drip trays is liquid plant fertiliser and hence not water?

Pedantic point I know, but just curious how that might play out.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35179
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 21 Jul 2011 12:52 pm

If it weren't water, the mozzie won't lay their eggs in it. Oiling has much the same effect except that it also smother the larva as well by cutting off access to oxygen.
Last edited by sundaymorningstaple on Thu, 21 Jul 2011 3:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Thu, 21 Jul 2011 2:32 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:If it weren't water, the mozzie won't lay their eggs in it. Oiling has much the same effect except that it also smother the larva as well by cutting off access to oxygen.


OIC, so they prosecute if they find larvae, rather than just finding standing water.


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Beauty, Health & Fitness”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests