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sundaymorningstaple
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 30 Jul 2011 10:50 am

That's pretty sad, really. :-|

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Postby Tigerslayer » Sat, 30 Jul 2011 10:27 pm

You make your bed, well then you have to lie in it.


To be fair it sounds like he is perfectly happy laying in it... one might suggest a little less laying in it is in order :lol:


At least in this country its not the tax payer that ends up footing the bill for such situations, at least not nearly as much.

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Postby BillyB » Sat, 30 Jul 2011 11:19 pm

It's not just Malay's who adopt the big family thing. It's a common happening across Asia. I don't see what the fuss is about. It's part of their culture, clearly makes them happy, and also ensures that they get looked after later in life. The family pulls together and shares the responsibility of taking proper care of the parents.

Compared to the Western approach, it's certainly more homely, loyal and selfless, than sticking your parents in a home, never visiting, and thinking that because you pay the care bills you are mother Teresa.

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Postby Tigerslayer » Sat, 30 Jul 2011 11:36 pm

Not sure how selfless it is to have children you can't afford and therefore provide them with a disadvantaged upbringing solely with the intent that they will look after you when you grow old.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 30 Jul 2011 11:53 pm

Yep, sure sounds like your parents made a big mistake. I'll give you that. :roll:

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Postby Tigerslayer » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 12:01 am

charming... :???:

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 12:09 am

Disadvantaged by who's yardstick? Yours? Or theirs.

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Postby Tigerslayer » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 12:15 am

I believe from the posts above it was said they are 'struggling to keep their heads above water'

If thats the case with 6 kids it seems irresponsible.

All I did was reply to someone who said it was selfless to bring up a big family to look after you when you grow old which it clearly is not.

You can choose to have a dig at me, but you could be more constructive with your opinion.

The fact is that for every kid a family has the income has to be split further and if you continue to accumulate children without baring this in mind it can hardly be advantageous for the child. Hence they would be disadvantaged.

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Postby x9200 » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 8:11 am

I agree, there are lots of families around bringing up their children almost as a pension plan, but then I see no link to the bigger families. Makes no business sense to me.
Yes, having a lot of children when one can not afford to provide them with decent living and education is irresponsible but I don't think this is that Asia specific. This is rather poverty and low education linked. Moreover, for the poorer countries the impact of having some more children is completely different comparing to the richer countries. Only for the later it pushes you down the social / financial ladder if the parents do not have sufficient funding.

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Postby BillyB » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 10:37 am

You're looking at it from an economic perspective. Families might struggle to make ends meet but get much more fulfillment from having a larger sense of togetherness.

Obviously if they are way below the poverty line then it's irresponsible to bring them into the world, but my point wasn't related to that argument.

And I'm seeing less importance tied to which school you went to or who daddy knows in the modern world, so kids who went to state schools do stand more of a chance these days. And the world is much better for it.

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Postby Waiting4Skyrim » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 11:02 am

BillyB wrote:It's not just Malay's who adopt the big family thing. It's a common happening across Asia. I don't see what the fuss is about. It's part of their culture, clearly makes them happy, and also ensures that they get looked after later in life. The family pulls together and shares the responsibility of taking proper care of the parents.


Above observation is quite accurate for Singaporean & Malaysian parents who are in 40s (or older). Spread of birth control & family planning gained momentum in 1970s & later.

Parents who are aged 30s (& younger) tend to have smaller (3 or less kids) families. Muslims (mostly Malays) are still bucking the trend with more than 3 kids.

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Postby poodlek » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 11:06 am

BillyB wrote:You're looking at it from an economic perspective. Families might struggle to make ends meet but get much more fulfillment from having a larger sense of togetherness.

Obviously if they are way below the poverty line then it's irresponsible to bring them into the world, but my point wasn't related to that argument.

And I'm seeing less importance tied to which school you went to or who daddy knows in the modern world, so kids who went to state schools do stand more of a chance these days. And the world is much better for it.


Of course there's the whole world overpopulation thing...

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Postby BillyB » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 11:07 am

Waiting4Skyrim wrote:
BillyB wrote:It's not just Malay's who adopt the big family thing. It's a common happening across Asia. I don't see what the fuss is about. It's part of their culture, clearly makes them happy, and also ensures that they get looked after later in life. The family pulls together and shares the responsibility of taking proper care of the parents.


Above observation is quite accurate for Singaporean & Malaysian parents who are in 40s (or older). Spread of birth control & family planning gained momentum in 1970s & later.

Parents who are aged 30s (& younger) tend to have smaller (3 or less kids) families. Muslims (mostly Malays) are still bucking the trend with more than 3 kids.


And also not only the Muslims in Malaysia - take East Malaysia for example

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Postby Mad Scientist » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 11:09 am

Waiting4Skyrim wrote:
BillyB wrote:It's not just Malay's who adopt the big family thing. It's a common happening across Asia. I don't see what the fuss is about. It's part of their culture, clearly makes them happy, and also ensures that they get looked after later in life. The family pulls together and shares the responsibility of taking proper care of the parents.


Above observation is quite accurate for Singaporean & Malaysian parents who are in 40s (or older). Spread of birth control & family planning gained momentum in 1970s & later.

Parents who are aged 30s (& younger) tend to have smaller (3 or less kids) families. Muslims (mostly Malays) are still bucking the trend with more than 3 kids.


Ahem..... I have four kids and my wife is Caucasian. Where I lived before in SG, Indonesia, OZ, NZ and in Sweden , most of our friends have at least three kids and more. Money is not everything and if you equate this with bringing up 4 children and having a big family , then your observation is misplaced.
Last edited by Mad Scientist on Sun, 31 Jul 2011 11:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
The positive thinker sees the invisible, feels the intangible, and achieves the impossible.Yahoo !!!

Waiting4Skyrim
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Postby Waiting4Skyrim » Sun, 31 Jul 2011 11:42 am

Mad Scientist wrote:
Waiting4Skyrim wrote:
BillyB wrote:It's not just Malay's who adopt the big family thing. It's a common happening across Asia. I don't see what the fuss is about. It's part of their culture, clearly makes them happy, and also ensures that they get looked after later in life. The family pulls together and shares the responsibility of taking proper care of the parents.


Above observation is quite accurate for Singaporean & Malaysian parents who are in 40s (or older). Spread of birth control & family planning gained momentum in 1970s & later.

Parents who are aged 30s (& younger) tend to have smaller (3 or less kids) families. Muslims (mostly Malays) are still bucking the trend with more than 3 kids.


Ah...hem..... I have four kids and my wife is Caucasian. Where I lived before in OZ, NZ and in Sweden , most of our friends have at least three kids and more. Money is not everything and if you equate this with bringing up 4 children and having a big family , then your observation is misplaced.


My observation is related to resumes of Singapore, PHL, MYS & IDN job applicants.


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