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Manthink
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Postby Manthink » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 1:01 am

ksl wrote:+1
I agree to a certain extent with TS.
The government here offer cash incentives for every child born, however in certain circumstances it could still be a problem..


I assume getting couples to have more children is an uphill task in most of the developed Asia-Pac economies from Japan to Taiwan. Singapore is no exception I am afraid..


It takes a great deal of self discipline and individualism to break away from the poor end of society, we normally say only the strongest survive, forgetting that the disadvantaged are normally very street wise...


Hunger, poverty and innocence can be a fertile ground for building a very driven and enterprising character. Kinda like what Steve Job saying "Stay hungry, stay foolish"...

And I certainly can imagine that if I am some poor, under-nourished, poorly schooled Chinese 9 year-old living in some large family kampong back in 1960's Singapore, I would certainly be driven to get educated and a little more daring.

Ultimately, it is the parenting role that plays a huge part on the child's development.
That applies to blue-collar background of Steve's adopted parents.

..in two generations Singapore has leaped ahead of everyone, which is undoubtedly frustrating for many from supposedly first world countries.


Things do change, like you have just said. Nothing's static.The only difference is it for the worst or better?

Fortunately, Singaporeans of the last 2 generations had made some very daring changes and sacrifices....They have my deepest respect and admiration for bringing this little accidental Nation to what we see today.

9th August...remember wasn't seen as a happy event by the locals just over 4 decades ago...

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ksl
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Postby ksl » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 12:45 pm

I was stationed at Meiktila Barracks on Dover Road back in 1970, with the British Army, its a school today just on the corner of Dover Rd, though i can still see our sleeping quarters and the old NAFFI. Meiktila was named after the battle of Meiktila Burma in 1945. Toa Payoh was the first HDB estate and I remember the night market on Bukit Timah Rd that stretched for 2 km or more.

Little India Gold shops had armed guards on every shop doorway, Singapore was a glorious dream posting for the services around the world, though were soldiers are there is always heavy drinking, sex and rock & roll Singapore was really known has Sin City back in those day's. I am also well aware of the troubles in the 60's too. Singapore for Brits is more personally connected through family history and the fallen at Kranji Changi, including other nations too.

It would actually be very interesting to know, how many actual Singaporeans are families are still around from those troubled times, and how many immigrants have claimed citizenship since.

The history of Singapore is very relevant to the security of today, and I know from the military perspective that Singapore does not walk alone, but relies heavily on others to come to its defence.

I often meet those Singaporeans that have lived through the hard times, has they show outward and warm appreciation, for the fallen in Singapore, so their families could lead a better existence.

I too am amazed at the change of Singapore, though many places from the 60's are still recognisable to me. Where the Cathay Shopping Mall is today,, used to be called the Cathay Pacific Hotel, and just outside was a very large roundabout, we often walked from Dover Rd to Holland village then onto Orchard for a night on the town.

I find it quite strange that i ended back in Singapore, has I never planned to arrive here at all so for me it was a calling has i had a vision on several occasions of a cemetery,which turned out to be Kranji I see it has my destiny as I am also not a degree holder, my wife from Taiwan was supposed to move back to UK, so I departed first to find accommodation in the UK, 3 months later I was totally surprised when she said change of plan, I'll meet you in Singapore.

What is strange is that before i married my wife back in 2000, I had told her of this strange vision of a cemetery i kept having when i was very sleepy, I knew it was in Singapore and I guessed all the white grave stones were identical, but i had never seen it.

Several months after my arrival we decided to visit Kranji and i was able to stand exactly close to the spot in my vision, oddly it was in the area of all the British graves, jokingly i said to my wife it looks like i was reborn.

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JR8
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Postby JR8 » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 1:10 pm

Manthink wrote:
ksl wrote:+1
I agree to a certain extent with TS.
The government here offer cash incentives for every child born, however in certain circumstances it could still be a problem..


I assume getting couples to have more children is an uphill task in most of the developed Asia-Pac economies from Japan to Taiwan. Singapore is no exception I am afraid..


It takes a great deal of self discipline and individualism to break away from the poor end of society, we normally say only the strongest survive, forgetting that the disadvantaged are normally very street wise...


Hunger, poverty and innocence can be a fertile ground for building a very driven and enterprising character. Kinda like what Steve Job saying "Stay hungry, stay foolish"...

And I certainly can imagine that if I am some poor, under-nourished, poorly schooled Chinese 9 year-old living in some large family kampong back in 1960's Singapore, I would certainly be driven to get educated and a little more daring.

Ultimately, it is the parenting role that plays a huge part on the child's development.
That applies to blue-collar background of Steve's adopted parents.

..in two generations Singapore has leaped ahead of everyone, which is undoubtedly frustrating for many from supposedly first world countries.


Things do change, like you have just said. Nothing's static.The only difference is it for the worst or better?

Fortunately, Singaporeans of the last 2 generations had made some very daring changes and sacrifices....They have my deepest respect and admiration for bringing this little accidental Nation to what we see today.

9th August...remember wasn't seen as a happy event by the locals just over 4 decades ago...



WTF is 'little accidental nation' about SG?

It was founded by the British to be a pivotal strategic port/city.

It still is.

Get over yourself.

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JR8
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Postby JR8 » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 1:23 pm

[quote="ksl"] Toa Payoh was the first HDB estate and I remember the night market on Bukit Timah Rd that stretched for 2 km or more./quote]



I understand Queenstown was first, Toa Payoh second.

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Postby nakatago » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 1:34 pm

JR8 wrote:WTF is 'little accidental nation' about SG?


Probably referring to 1965 when Singapore was ejected from Malaysia.

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Postby Manthink » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 2:27 pm

nakatago wrote:
JR8 wrote:WTF is 'little accidental nation' about SG?
Probably referring to 1965 when Singapore was ejected from Malaysia.


I did mentioned "4-decades" earlier, didn't I? :wink:

Actually one has the British to thank for setting that spark in 1942 that ignite the flame of anti-colonialism which lead to the birth of this Republic. It is accidental as it was never the intern nor conceivable that this Island can acheive statehood before '65.

"There must be no thought of sparing the troops or population; commanders and senior officers should die with their troops. The honour of the British Empire and the British Army is at stake."- Winston Churchill before the final Japanese attack in 1942.

Image

Manthink
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Postby Manthink » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 2:44 pm

ksl wrote:Several months after my arrival we decided to visit Kranji and i was able to stand exactly close to the spot in my vision, oddly it was in the area of all the British graves, jokingly i said to my wife it looks like i was reborn.


Powerful! Thanks for sharing that.

I am curious if you believe having stayed at one of those WW barracks in Dover road had somehow contribute to that image of Kranji in your dream?

Image[/img]

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JR8
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Postby JR8 » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 5:14 pm

nakatago wrote:
JR8 wrote:WTF is 'little accidental nation' about SG?


Probably referring to 1965 when Singapore was ejected from Malaysia.


Oh yes I forgot SG didn't exist before 1965.... lol

ps. The concept of SG as a 'nation' being inseparable from Big Daddy's monumental ego.

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Postby taxico » Tue, 02 Aug 2011 7:20 pm

JR8 wrote:Oh yes I forgot SG didn't exist before 1965.... lol


independent singapore (or singapore as a "state") didn't exist before they were kicked out of the malaysian federation, but "singapore" had existed for a long long time.
Aut viam ad caelum inveniam aut faciam


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