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10k enough to open bubble tea shop ?

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Mr Tan
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10k enough to open bubble tea shop ?

Postby Mr Tan » Tue, 07 Jun 2011 8:27 am

i am only expecting 200 per month, i mean roi

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Postby blogtowkay » Tue, 07 Jun 2011 12:59 pm

might be enough, if you can find a location with rental of less than 2k?

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Postby blogtowkay » Tue, 07 Jun 2011 1:00 pm


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shameenali
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Postby shameenali » Fri, 01 Jul 2011 9:34 am

Hi Tan,

It actually depends on how you wish to set up your shop. ROI of 2% for a start is reasonable given the amount of capital that you are pumping in. Ideally this should increase to 10-15% in the long run to keep you happy. Also do keep in mind that you will need working capital requirements (rent, PUB, staff salaries, ingredients, fixed assets etc) for atleast upto 6 months in case your setting up shop for the first time in a new location. Takes time for clients to know your shop, word of mouth publicity to kick in etc. I do know of a shop @ The Bencoolen which seems to be making pretty good business selling Taiwanese Bubble Tea. Maybe you could look into something like that :)

Mr Tan
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re

Postby Mr Tan » Thu, 21 Jul 2011 8:20 am

thanks sheerman .....

Mr Tan
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Postby Mr Tan » Mon, 05 Sep 2011 12:22 pm

does it really need 6 months to see results , isnt it a bit long ?


shameenali wrote:Hi Tan,

It actually depends on how you wish to set up your shop. ROI of 2% for a start is reasonable given the amount of capital that you are pumping in. Ideally this should increase to 10-15% in the long run to keep you happy. Also do keep in mind that you will need working capital requirements (rent, PUB, staff salaries, ingredients, fixed assets etc) for atleast upto 6 months in case your setting up shop for the first time in a new location. Takes time for clients to know your shop, word of mouth publicity to kick in etc. I do know of a shop @ The Bencoolen which seems to be making pretty good business selling Taiwanese Bubble Tea. Maybe you could look into something like that :)

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Postby Anastacia » Fri, 09 Sep 2011 3:47 pm

I think every business takes time and effort to see the desired / long term result. Guess you need to run it for a while to make it stabilize, and make sure that your business will stand the test of time and remains profitable after 6 months. As Shaneenali said, you need time to cover your startup cost too. You will need a good marketing plan, and of cos, good bubble tea. :) Wish you luck on your business Mr Tan

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Postby beppi » Fri, 09 Sep 2011 7:51 pm

It's a rule of thumb that, if you are not able to finance 6 months without any turnover, you better not start the business. Others say 3 years with no profits, but the idea remains the same: Don't start if you don't have enough to survive dry times!

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Postby grandmamalove » Sat, 10 Sep 2011 12:52 am

beppi wrote:It's a rule of thumb that, if you are not able to finance 6 months without any turnover, you better not start the business. Others say 3 years with no profits, but the idea remains the same: Don't start if you don't have enough to survive dry times!


tough reality huh...
but there are a lot of bubble tea shops popping up here I have come to notice

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Postby Mr Tan » Sat, 10 Sep 2011 2:12 pm

its not a explosive business but a stable business.


grandmamalove wrote:
beppi wrote:It's a rule of thumb that, if you are not able to finance 6 months without any turnover, you better not start the business. Others say 3 years with no profits, but the idea remains the same: Don't start if you don't have enough to survive dry times!


tough reality huh...
but there are a lot of bubble tea shops popping up here I have come to notice

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Postby beppi » Sat, 10 Sep 2011 2:40 pm

Ten years ago, bubble tea shops suddenly popped up on EVERY street corner - and all but a handful of them closed within a few months. Then, for years, you had to search really hard to find any in Singapore. Now it seems the second wave of irrational shop-openings is coming over us.
You call that stable?!?

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Postby ksl » Sun, 11 Sep 2011 2:01 am

Mr Tan! Today i met with a business acquaintance from Taiwan, who runs two bubble tea shops, one in Blah blah blah and the other in China Town. The cost of the China town setup was 60,000 inclusive of everything. I asked if he franchises, but he said there are more famous Taiwanese brands available though much more costly than what he has paid out, that's why he set up his own. Though he maybe interested in supplying.

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Postby ksl » Mon, 12 Sep 2011 3:38 pm

beppi wrote:Ten years ago, bubble tea shops suddenly popped up on EVERY street corner - and all but a handful of them closed within a few months. Then, for years, you had to search really hard to find any in Singapore. Now it seems the second wave of irrational shop-openings is coming over us.
You call that stable?!?


Copy cats! Happens with all products here, if they see that its moving, you have to be first to market to have any real chance, then stay ahead of the game when its peaking.

I see lots and lots selling Taiwan food now, though it's not original, just like the western fish & chips! Jokingly I said to my Taiwanese wife, how do you feel that some Singaporeans are making a bad name of Taiwanese food! She said the same as me, when i try to buy an original western meal! There are excellent opportunities for original cooking :-|

Mr Tan
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Postby Mr Tan » Mon, 12 Sep 2011 4:42 pm

well , before u know it , u see people popping up with your ideas not only that improvising them . thats the market u are in now. i copy and paste other business model , i'll just take spoon and take a share for your profits.

u bring in new products , i go improvise them and brand them .
u bring in new services, i too copy and improvise them
1 month is all i need to copy and paste.

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Postby Mr Tan » Mon, 19 Sep 2011 5:59 pm

went to gong cha so called leading brand and ordered a cup of caramel milktea . here is my verdict.

ubi shop vs gong cha
(5 as the perfect score)

taste : 4 : 3
although gong cha gave alot of pearls , the pearls were too small , it seems the ubi shop added something to it perhaps cream to make the taste special

commercial feel 4 : 4
i gave 4 to both , gong cha looks very professional with frequent queues , i gave 4 for the ubi shop because the shop layout is very simple yet very taiwan feel , the pictures are nicely presented , lots of variety , makes me stop and ordered because of its commercial feel.


price 5 : 3
for the price of 2.00 against 3.20 resulted in this fair score

marketing 2: 5
i dont think the ubi store has yet a marketing or franchise plan yet


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