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What exactly is going on in Egypt and what repercussions ?

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What exactly is going on in Egypt and what repercussions ?

Postby tyianchang » Fri, 04 Feb 2011 7:33 pm

I'm surprised to find this forum in the hot dot so quiet on the current Egyptian crisis so I hope students in international affairs, reporters , Egyptologists and the concerned pubic will come forth to engage in projecting a peaceful solution to the current struggle.

I have not been to Egypt or read much about its politics. But from friends and collegaues who'd been there, they love it. It is one Muslim country that embraces diversity and orthodox Christian Egyptians. It comes as a shock to find it in the gridlock between diverging groups.
What exactly did Mubarak do wrong and what was his political inclination? More than that, what triggered the recent mass protests in Tunisia, Algeria and what seems to be spreading over the ME in states like Jordan and Yemen? What repercussions will it all have on the rest of the world?
It's a shame that any peaceful protests should break out into lootings, fighting and retaliations. This calls for a major assessment of the current trouble and ways to fix it.
Surely, in a time of such hardships as rising unemployment, food shortages and economic gloom, the people should work together constructively to find an agreed constitutional make over rather than force the changes with 'power to the people' slogans?
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Postby durain » Fri, 04 Feb 2011 8:50 pm

well, we cant debate on every single hot topic that is happening around the world, can we? :)

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Postby Strong Eagle » Sat, 05 Feb 2011 12:01 am

It is a big freak mess. No doubt Mubarak has failed to do many things. OTOH, he has maintained diplomatic relations with Israel and fought Islamic terrorists. He has been a strong supporter of the US. Egypt's stability has brought consistency to the economy.

What is he to be replaced with? Is the democratic middle class of Egypt strong enough to see a democratically elected centrist put in place, or will the extremists, like the Brotherhood, gain power and attempt to enforce extremist Shariah law?

Be careful of what you wish for when it comes to power change. The new boss could be far worse than the old boss. Economic chaos could ensue that would affect all of us globally. Keep Mubarak until the proper, or at least, reasonable, alternative has been found. Last thing we need is Islamic extremists taking over... they need to be killed.

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Postby k1w1 » Sat, 05 Feb 2011 4:26 am

I agree, it would be terrible if any kind of extremists were voted in, but that's the nature of democacy, surely - Egyptians should be allowed to elect their leader/s themselves.

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Postby tyianchang » Sat, 05 Feb 2011 4:30 pm

durain wrote:well, we cant debate on every single hot topic that is happening around the world, can we? :)


It comes from a feeling for the ordinary Egyptian in this precarious political uncertainty e.g. who's to succeed Mubarak?
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Postby tyianchang » Sat, 05 Feb 2011 4:44 pm

Very valid points raised above.
Mubarak has done a very difficult job though there had been allegations of election rigging and corruption, including imprisonment without trials - according to wikipeadia. Equally, he's on very tough territory, had sustained stability in the country and initiated the peace treaty with Israel.
If what goes round comes round is the norm of the day, they should allow him to exit in due course and with some gratitude for his service to the nation.
But the protest is tainted by lootings and sporadic acts of violence. At the moment, the country's losing 13 million GBP everyday. Can any country afford that drain but in this situation, it's an ironic imbalance of needs versus dysfunctionality. They should all quickly resolve the differences and bring back normality. Egypt has a civilised culture of over 4000 years.
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Postby nakatago » Sat, 05 Feb 2011 5:12 pm

actual sign in egypt

Image

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Postby tyianchang » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 2:56 pm

nakatago wrote:actual sign in egypt

Image


Yeah, there're cool Egyptians but the cases of lootings and violence were not. The army's proved to be well neutral though and they've played a crucial role to ensure the protests are possible.
Suprising how the US had suddenly changed their stance yesterday and is now calling for a constitutional exit for Mubarak. Which is to be expected anyway.
Last edited by tyianchang on Sun, 06 Feb 2011 3:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby poodlek » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 3:02 pm

nakatago wrote:actual sign in egypt

Image


I'd hazard a guess that it's actually in a parallel protest in Toronto. Is it cold enough in Cairo to be wearing winter coats, gloves and Maple Leafs toques?

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Postby tyianchang » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 3:09 pm

poodlek wrote:
nakatago wrote:actual sign in egypt

Image


I'd hazard a guess that it's actually in a parallel protest in Toronto. Is it cold enough in Cairo to be wearing winter coats, gloves and Maple Leafs toques?


Good insight but they're Egyptians and hey, this guy might be a coptic christian, or a muslim.
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Postby poodlek » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 3:13 pm

tyianchang wrote:Good insight but they're Egyptians and hey, this guy might be a coptic christian, or a muslim.


Sorry. This is definitely Toronto. Of course he is very likely an Egyptian expat.

And what the heck does being a coptic Christian or Muslim have to do with wearing a Maple Leafs toque??

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Postby tyianchang » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 4:21 pm

poodlek wrote:
tyianchang wrote:Good insight but they're Egyptians and hey, this guy might be a coptic christian, or a muslim.


Sorry. This is definitely Toronto. Of course he is very likely an Egyptian expat.

And what the heck does being a coptic Christian or Muslim have to do with wearing a Maple Leafs toque??


Try having some manners if you want to ask a question. Typical of the assumptions you made here - he can jolly well be a Canadian Egyptian.
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Postby poodlek » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 5:00 pm

tyianchang wrote:
poodlek wrote:
tyianchang wrote:Good insight but they're Egyptians and hey, this guy might be a coptic christian, or a muslim.


Sorry. This is definitely Toronto. Of course he is very likely an Egyptian expat.

And what the heck does being a coptic Christian or Muslim have to do with wearing a Maple Leafs toque??


Try having some manners if you want to ask a question. Typical of the assumptions you made here - he can jolly well be a Canadian Egyptian.


Try understanding my point before you scold me. (And besides, I was using my manners. If I wanted to cause offense I would not have used the word "heck"). My point was that he IS Canadian, very obviously so. And that this particular demonstration is being held in Toronto, not Egypt as was originally claimed. What we can't tell at all from this photo is his birth place or his religion. We can tell that it is cold outside, and he supports the Toronto hockey team. That is why he is wearing a Maple Leafs toque.

It is also very likely he is just a regular Canadian joe, passionate about world politics and willing to show his support to those overseas. I have my suspicions that this particular demonstration was fueled by a locally notorious group of Sri Lankan rabble rousers. A person doesn't have to be affiliated with Egypt in any way to care about what is going on there.

In any case, the behavior and demeanor of the guy holding the sign is indicative of how protests and demonstrations are conducted in Canada (typically--I'm not talking about G20 or whenever Les Canadiens are in the playoffs), whether they are Egyptian or otherwise. It can't be compared to how people are comporting themselves in Cairo.

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Postby ecureilx » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 5:52 pm

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picture ... ml?image=6

I know it is not useful, but .. some spice to Egypt :)

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Postby nakatago » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 10:49 pm

I find it astounding that a mistake on my part (the image was too whimsical and I was too lazy to do a fact check) on the post degenerated into an argument about assumptions.

I own up to my mistakes but I wouldn't push my warped sense of morality onto other people in a misguided attempt to look knowledgeable and to cover up my mistake.


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