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Filial Piety Revisited

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Postby poodlek » Wed, 02 Feb 2011 9:32 pm

nakatago wrote:TL;DR. that said, Amy chua now has had to emphasize that "how I was humbled by a 13 year old " is part of her book's title.

Also, was kinda hoping for a cat fight. "Son, I am disappoint." /meme reference

:P :twisted:


Sorry boys, I'm not that type of girl :wink:

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 02 Feb 2011 9:35 pm

poodlek wrote:
Dork! :-P

:lol:

I was going to call SMS's submission troll bait, but so far the troll has not been baited... oh well, I'm still entertained :-)

Ah well depends on how you define troll. It is a post written with the intention of luring (as in trolling for fish) others into often heated debate, and in that case you're right it was troll bait and it worked. If however you consider a troll an anti-social creature who lives under bridges and so on, no you're right, she seems to have held back.


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Postby Addadude » Wed, 02 Feb 2011 11:17 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:That IS an image of women in a civilized discussion. They still got clothes on AND they aren't ripped & torn! :cool:


And not a drop of mud in sight either!
"Both politicians and nappies need to be changed regularly, and for the same reasons."

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 02 Feb 2011 11:32 pm

Image

Cor, imagine being drowned in jelly by that pair! 8-) :o

Jelly, Jelly, Jelly!

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 12:03 am

JR8 wrote:Image

Cor, imagine being drowned in jelly by that pair! 8-) :o

Jelly, Jelly, Jelly!


I am! I am! [-o< :)

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Postby Plavt » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 12:30 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:
JR8 wrote:Image

Cor, imagine being drowned in jelly by that pair! 8-) :o

Jelly, Jelly, Jelly!


I am! I am! [-o< :)


Image

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 1:15 am

You're just jealous cause you didn't seem 'em first! :tongue: :devil:

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Postby earthfriendly » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 1:38 am

I think Amy Chua is way over the top. Witholding bathroom breaks, that's bad for the kids' health. I have never heard that kind of things happening to any of my chinese friends. This is too extreme. There are Chinese moms who like to override their kids' preferences e.g academic majors or extra-curriculum activities or making it compulsory to play an instrument. All done with the "mothers know best" mentality. They think they are insuring the kids' future by equipping them with "marketable" skills.

She conveniently justified her methods by invoking Confucianism. Did she try to research what the philosophy is all about?

They did an informal survey of 25 people about this article on Asiaone and all of them felt she was way too harsh.


The other side of the coin:

http://www.cnngo.com/shanghai/life/hele ... z1BwGgcNyq

http://bettymingliu.com/2011/01/parents ... n-therapy/

I find the title of the article arrogant and sensationalistic but Amy Chua did not coin it, WSJ did. Kudos to WSJ for generating so much controversy and readership.

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Postby earthfriendly » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 2:46 am

Mary Hatch Bailey wrote:Obviously I don't think there is ever a good reason to call a 7 year old 'garbage'


Okay, I know the term goes against your sensibility. I think it is a bad word to use on anyone but it is also important to take things in its context. The world is not so black and white. People communicate their ideas differently and sometimes it may be cultural. Here's an explanation of "false modesty". A bit like how some chinese would be lost when you compliment them. Rather than responding with a "thank you", they will try to deflect it like like "mei yo" abit like "no lah". They are trying to deflect it and not appear swell headed and make it seem like they don't deserve the praise. It can come across as twisted if one is not used to this style.

"I lived in China (PRC) in the 1980′s largely before the the economic boom of the last 10-20 years so my observations are from a quieter less frantic Chinese society. In 1983-84 I lived in Zhengzhou in Henan Province and in Nanjing from 1987 to 1989. Most Chinese parents I knew parented more by example than pushing and threats. Since I lived at the university in both cities all of the Chinese people I knew were intellectuals so that may also influence my take on all of this. I did observe parents of other walks of life in the streets and out at the parks and whichever “class”

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Postby ksl » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 4:21 am

AC a self styled narcissist, and look at me attention seeker, probably an ex suicide patient too, anything will do for attention, the style of writing gives it all away. She just doesn't realise how bad she is,....worst of all she has a following :roll: What happened to filial piety in her family i wonder, the parents didn't make the grade :-| I was also at Uni in China in 1992 dragged out to the front of the class to be humiliated because I hadn't studied hard enough to remember 20 characters and write them all on the blackboard in the correct order, its true to say that teaching in China is to humiliate.

Though it doesn't work at all if you are thick skinned like me :) everything is parrot fashion in China, it lacks substance and knowledge, the name of the game is to copy copy and remember every detail, but you do not know why at the time.

Though I know now its for passing exams :lol: memorise the book first, it has some benefits in the west too.

China has a very rich tradition in its traditional sense and the west can learn much from it, though its far from perfect just like any other nation. AC takes it to the extreme I'm afraid and its obvious she is selling books because to be controversial sells if its true or not doesn't really matter, its what people believe that matters.

Rather early in the morning for this, I'm off to bed.

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Postby Mary Hatch Bailey » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 7:29 am

earthfriendly wrote:
Mary Hatch Bailey wrote:Obviously I don't think there is ever a good reason to call a 7 year old 'garbage'


Okay, I know the term goes against your sensibility. I think it is a bad word to use on anyone but it is also important to take things in its context. The world is not so black and white. People communicate their ideas differently and sometimes it may be cultural. Here's an explanation of "false modesty". A bit like how some chinese would be lost when you compliment them. Rather than responding with a "thank you", they will try to deflect it like like "mei yo" abit like "no lah". They are trying to deflect it and not appear swell headed and make it seem like they don't deserve the praise. It can come across as twisted if one is not used to this style.

"I lived in China (PRC) in the 1980′s largely before the the economic boom of the last 10-20 years so my observations are from a quieter less frantic Chinese society. In 1983-84 I lived in Zhengzhou in Henan Province and in Nanjing from 1987 to 1989. Most Chinese parents I knew parented more by example than pushing and threats. Since I lived at the university in both cities all of the Chinese people I knew were intellectuals so that may also influence my take on all of this. I did observe parents of other walks of life in the streets and out at the parks and whichever “class”

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 12:39 pm

EF,

Thanks for those additional links. They, as well as the additional links (viewpoints) that they contained, has made interesting reading this morning.

sms

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Postby Wind In My Hair » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 4:07 pm

Did I miss the catfight? It's amazing how often these threads morph into pictures of skimpily dressed women... must be this forum's version of Godwin.

The fact that 'filial piety' has no equivalent English term is telling. It's hard to talk about it in an English-language forum because so much gets lost in translation.

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Postby Brah » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 4:27 pm

Thus spoke the Master Baiter

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Postby JR8 » Thu, 03 Feb 2011 6:26 pm

earthfriendly wrote:I think Amy Chua is way over the top. Witholding bathroom breaks, that's bad for the kids' health. I have never heard that kind of things happening to any of my chinese friends. This is too extreme. There are Chinese moms who like to override their kids' preferences e.g academic majors or extra-curriculum activities or making it compulsory to play an instrument. All done with the "mothers know best" mentality. They think they are insuring the kids' future by equipping them with "marketable" skills.

She conveniently justified her methods by invoking Confucianism. Did she try to research what the philosophy is all about?

They did an informal survey of 25 people about this article on Asiaone and all of them felt she was way too harsh.


The other side of the coin:

http://www.cnngo.com/shanghai/life/hele ... z1BwGgcNyq

http://bettymingliu.com/2011/01/parents ... n-therapy/

I find the title of the article arrogant and sensationalistic but Amy Chua did not coin it, WSJ did. Kudos to WSJ for generating so much controversy and readership.



Interesting, as was this 'follow-on' link...
http://bettymingliu.com/2011/01/forget- ... confucius/

I laughed when I got to this bit...
'When I was 19, my father died of a heart attack. Who knows what would’ve happened if he had held on and run my life. With Mom all alone, my sister and I tried to take care of her. But then I started therapy in my 30s and suddenly realized how needy my mother was. The breakthrough moment was realizing that I could get mad. What a novel idea: it’s possible to love my parents and still be angry with them.'


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