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Scolding in the offices of western Europe

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IOP
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Scolding in the offices of western Europe

Postby IOP » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 3:11 pm

I work with British and Aussies in the office, and it's high pressure on my ears, because they scolding too much.
So nice looking guys with so bad words in their mouth.
It's interesting what is the scolding level in the western part of Europe?
I've started to apply for jobs in Norway and Switzerland.
Are they scolding too much in the banks sector?

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Re: Scolding in the offices of western Europe

Postby JayCee » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 3:36 pm

IOP wrote:I work with British and Aussies in the office, and it's high pressure on my ears, because they scolding too much.
So nice looking guys with so bad words in their mouth.
It's interesting what is the scolding level in the western part of Europe?
I've started to apply for jobs in Norway and Switzerland.
Are they scolding too much in the banks sector?


You mean swearing/cursing I assume?

In that case, f*ck yeah they do it a lot :D

IOP
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Re: Scolding in the offices of western Europe

Postby IOP » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 3:43 pm

JayCee wrote:
IOP wrote:I work with British and Aussies in the office, and it's high pressure on my ears, because they scolding too much.
So nice looking guys with so bad words in their mouth.
It's interesting what is the scolding level in the western part of Europe?
I've started to apply for jobs in Norway and Switzerland.
Are they scolding too much in the banks sector?


You mean swearing/cursing I assume?

In that case, f*ck yeah they do it a lot :D


Why you are so sure? It much depends on a country. Have you worked in Oslo or Basel?

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Re: Scolding in the offices of western Europe

Postby JayCee » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 3:51 pm

IOP wrote:
JayCee wrote:
IOP wrote:I work with British and Aussies in the office, and it's high pressure on my ears, because they scolding too much.
So nice looking guys with so bad words in their mouth.
It's interesting what is the scolding level in the western part of Europe?
I've started to apply for jobs in Norway and Switzerland.
Are they scolding too much in the banks sector?


You mean swearing/cursing I assume?

In that case, f*ck yeah they do it a lot :D


Why you are so sure? It much depends on a country. Have you worked in Oslo or Basel?


Nope, but I've worked with Norwegian and Swiss guys and they swear the same as everyone else when in a high-pressured environment.

I don't think the issue is so much as where people are from but rather the job you're doing, and if you're in a bank with a lot of pressure it's not uncommon to hear lots of swearing, especially from traders

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 5:07 pm

Think you need to consider it as a constant pressure relief valve. Whereas Asians appear to bottle it up more, but then snap and go totally postal.

Asians working with westerners on a trading floor seem to adopt the 'constant valve' approach in my experience. That's evolution in progress eh? :)

As JayCee says, it goes with the work territory, rather than a geographic one.

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Postby ScoobyDoes » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 6:20 pm

In Asia it's not so much the F-word, it's stuff like 'Go Die', 'eat sh!t' and the like. I heard a nice one from Korea that went along the lines of 'Your mama's got no pubic hair.' Nice and polite in terms of the words used, but deeply insulting.



I know if somebody told me to f-off that i'd much rather be f'd than dead!



And agree, it has less to do with the country one is from and more to do with the career one has chosen to follow. See, me too can speak like got smell up one's nose ;)
'When Lewis Hamilton wins a race he has to thank Vodafone whereas in my day I used to chase the crumpet. I know which era I'd rather race in.'

SIR Stirling Moss OBE

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Re: Scolding in the offices of western Europe

Postby Wind In My Hair » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 9:34 pm

IOP wrote:I work with British and Aussies in the office, and it's high pressure on my ears, because they scolding too much.
So nice looking guys with so bad words in their mouth.

And they tell us they are here to show us what culture and good breeding is :lol:

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 9:57 pm

Try to stop being holier-than-thou WIMH, we're in SG because your country needs and benefits from us. Get over it will you.

If you can't stand the heat job-wise then get out of the kitchen, and let FT step in instead.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UXomMnQKT4
and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZEBz01t5vg

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Postby Wind In My Hair » Wed, 19 Jan 2011 11:20 pm

Oh I forgot to mention a sense of humour... :-k

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Postby JR8 » Thu, 20 Jan 2011 1:04 am

Are the government bringing in FT to fill the humour gap as well?

Well I never! :wink:

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Postby Mary Hatch Bailey » Thu, 20 Jan 2011 7:56 am

As an American, brought up by fairly strict or at least conventional Catholic parents in the 70s ~ I am still shocked at the amount of swearing in Singapore. Most Baby-boomers I know, just weren't allowed to cuss at home, so it is still a bit rattling.

Mostly I ignore it, but if I am shopping, let's say at the Zara in Ion to convey a recent example, I will ask the staff to change the music if it is a rap song which repeats the phrase 'So f*ck the b*tch!' over and over again. Shopping is demoralizing enough without the soundtrack of misogyny thrown in for good measure. What always surprises me is how unaware or uncaring everyone else is ~ young mothers with children, happily going about their business with angry filth blaring through a crappy sound system. Sometimes when I approach the staff behind the counter, I'll smile sweetly and say something like; Would you mind changing the f*cking disc so I don't have to listen to some f*ckwit scream 'f*ck you' while I'm f*cking shopping? They get the point and I have a little chuckle.

Don't get me wrong, I am all for a well-placed expletive, in fact I use them all the time to make a point. I believe there is a time and a place, though and they should be used with some discretion. I would never want to listen to a cleaned up version of Scaface or a Ricky Gervais podcast.

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Postby IOP » Thu, 20 Jan 2011 9:27 am

Mary Hatch Bailey wrote:As an American, brought up by fairly strict or at least conventional Catholic parents in the 70s ~ I am still shocked at the amount of swearing in Singapore. Most Baby-boomers I know, just weren't allowed to cuss at home, so it is still a bit rattling.
...




Yeap, I think here they copy too much form Hollywood productions...
In reality, I have heard that US is more ethical then it seems to be for outsiders.

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Postby Mary Hatch Bailey » Thu, 20 Jan 2011 9:47 am

IOP wrote:
Mary Hatch Bailey wrote:As an American, brought up by fairly strict or at least conventional Catholic parents in the 70s ~ I am still shocked at the amount of swearing in Singapore. Most Baby-boomers I know, just weren't allowed to cuss at home, so it is still a bit rattling.
...




Yeap, I think here they copy too much form Hollywood productions...
In reality, I have heard that US is more ethical then it seems to be for outsiders.


Believe me, ethics have nothing to do with it...

I will say, the US is a lot more puritanical than most people realize. Europeans can't understand why we get all kerfluffled about sex on TV, or swearing but our collective cultural experience is different and in a lot of ways, more uptight and rigid.

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Postby JayCee » Thu, 20 Jan 2011 10:44 am

Mary Hatch Bailey wrote:Believe me, ethics have nothing to do with it...

I will say, the US is a lot more puritanical than most people realize. Europeans can't understand why we get all kerfluffled about sex on TV, or swearing but our collective cultural experience is different and in a lot of ways, more uptight and rigid.


Yeah I must admit, I never understand why Americans (particularly in the less, how should I say it, open-minded parts of the country) get so bothered about the sex thing, especially considering a lot of them have a shotgun or pistol in their garage.

Guns or sex, which is worst? Apparently sex :?

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Postby poodlek » Thu, 20 Jan 2011 10:59 am

Mary Hatch Bailey wrote:As an American, brought up by fairly strict or at least conventional Catholic parents in the 70s ~ I am still shocked at the amount of swearing in Singapore. Most Baby-boomers I know, just weren't allowed to cuss at home, so it is still a bit rattling.

Mostly I ignore it, but if I am shopping, let's say at the Zara in Ion to convey a recent example, I will ask the staff to change the music if it is a rap song which repeats the phrase 'So f*ck the b*tch!' over and over again. Shopping is demoralizing enough without the soundtrack of misogyny thrown in for good measure. What always surprises me is how unaware or uncaring everyone else is ~ young mothers with children, happily going about their business with angry filth blaring through a crappy sound system. Sometimes when I approach the staff behind the counter, I'll smile sweetly and say something like; Would you mind changing the f*cking disc so I don't have to listen to some f*ckwit scream 'f*ck you' while I'm f*cking shopping? They get the point and I have a little chuckle.

Don't get me wrong, I am all for a well-placed expletive, in fact I use them all the time to make a point. I believe there is a time and a place, though and they should be used with some discretion. I would never want to listen to a cleaned up version of Scaface or a Ricky Gervais podcast.


What I find hilarious is that they can't even get the word "tits" past the censors on TV, and yet walking through the mall I hear fully-intact Eminem songs played in many of the shops...I took it as the words were going by too fast for them to know what he was actually saying. I'd love to write it down and show them :lol:


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