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Questions about LPR

Relocating, travelling or planning to make Singapore home? Discuss the criterias, passes or visa that is required.
FaeLLe
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Postby FaeLLe » Fri, 29 Oct 2010 5:24 pm

milkman123 wrote:
sundaymorningstaple wrote:What can I say!

Care to elaborate whats that supposed to imply.


I suggest you forget about an LPR for now.

Multiple reasons,
- Current visa status
- Nationality

LPR is usally for people who do not have a residency status (of any kind) I guess, though there is no official citation that I could find for this.

Good luck though but I think time and tide are against your favour.

milkman123
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Postby milkman123 » Sat, 30 Oct 2010 9:32 am

FaeLLe wrote:
milkman123 wrote:
sundaymorningstaple wrote:What can I say!

Care to elaborate whats that supposed to imply.


I suggest you forget about an LPR for now.

Multiple reasons,
- Current visa status
- Nationality

LPR is usally for people who do not have a residency status (of any kind) I guess, though there is no official citation that I could find for this.

Good luck though but I think time and tide are against your favour.

Thanks for your comment FaeLLe. You are right it is gonna be hard to get LPR at this time and while I am applying I am not keeping my hopes any high. The only reason I am applying is just because I have time and money to spend at the moment. Its just that time of my life that I can afford to spend 6-8 months on this and even if it gets rejected I wouldn't loose anything except for the money! and as far as the time is concerned, I am not planning to come to Singapore before atleast 6 months so thats why I thought its worth it.
You said that current visa status is against me. Does having an EPEC affect the result of LPR application? I read somewhere on this forum that having an EPEC does not affect LPR and there are many cases in which people having EPEC got LPR.

milkman123
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Postby milkman123 » Sat, 30 Oct 2010 9:43 am

revhappy wrote:
milkman123 wrote:
sundaymorningstaple wrote:What can I say!

Care to elaborate whats that supposed to imply.


I would suggest do some reading in the forum and see how even people from EU countries had their LPR rejected. Then do a proper analysis as to whether you stand any chance.

From whatever limited experience I have and also from what I gathered from this forum is that it is quite hard to predict anything on this. I have friends from subcontinent(including Pakistan) who got their LPR accepted and while around the same time some of my friends from more developed countries applied and got theirs rejected. No two applications are the same and it depends on a number of other factors than just the nationality so I think its hard for me to analyse my chances just by seeing other people's results. I guess the only way to know is by applying! Thanks for your suggestion though.

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Postby revhappy » Sat, 30 Oct 2010 1:35 pm

milkman123 wrote:...I wouldn't loose anything except for the money! ...


Its actually lose . Loose is used as in "Belt is loose" :).
Dont worry, this is the most common mistake even the most educated people from the subcontinent make. And a big penchant for linguistics that I have, I love to point it out :P

milkman123
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Postby milkman123 » Sat, 30 Oct 2010 3:41 pm

revhappy wrote:
milkman123 wrote:...I wouldn't loose anything except for the money! ...


Its actually lose . Loose is used as in "Belt is loose" :).
Dont worry, this is the most common mistake even the most educated people from the subcontinent make. And a big penchant for linguistics that I have, I love to point it out :P

:oops:

wkwoods
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Postby wkwoods » Tue, 02 Nov 2010 10:50 am

Milkman,

I wouldn't worry about being from Pakistan at all. The proportion of subcontinent migrants (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka) has increased markedly over the last 5 years, so clearly, the Government is encouraging well qualified people from the subcontinent. The population mix has changed over the past 5 years as the population swelled to 5m+. Both the Malay and Chinese population are declining, while the Indian population is surging from migration. In some ways, Indians, Pakistanis and Sri Lankans integrate better with Singaporeans than mainland Chinese because of a common shared British heritage.

Even the HDB has responded. In January of this year, HDB increased the ethnic limit for Indian-owned HDB flats from 12% to 15% in their Ethinic Integration Policy. In some HDB blocks, Indians are bumping up against the limit already. However, the Govt does not set limits for private housing, so condos like Tanjong Rhu are slowly becoming Indian enclaves. At last count there are about 5 Indian International Schools in Singapore!

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Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 02 Nov 2010 5:17 pm

wkwoods wrote:Milkman,

I wouldn't worry about being from Pakistan at all. The proportion of subcontinent migrants (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka) has increased markedly over the last 5 years, so clearly, the Government is encouraging well qualified people from the subcontinent. The population mix has changed over the past 5 years as the population swelled to 5m+. Both the Malay and Chinese population are declining, while the Indian population is surging from migration. In some ways, Indians, Pakistanis and Sri Lankans integrate better with Singaporeans than mainland Chinese because of a common shared British heritage.

Even the HDB has responded. In January of this year, HDB increased the ethnic limit for Indian-owned HDB flats from 12% to 15% in their Ethinic Integration Policy. In some HDB blocks, Indians are bumping up against the limit already. However, the Govt does not set limits for private housing, so condos like Tanjong Rhu are slowly becoming Indian enclaves. At last count there are about 5 Indian International Schools in Singapore!


The numbers are changing but it is not radical. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Singapore

From a table:

Ethnic composition (%) of resident population (chart) Ethnic 1970 1980 1990 2000 2009
Chinese 77.0 78.3 77.7 76.8 74.2
Malays 14.8 14.4 14.1 13.9 13.4
Indians 7.0 6.3 7.1 7.9 9.2
Others 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.4 3.2

in 10 years there has been a 1.3 percent increase in Indians.


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