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Fresh Graduate jobs

Discuss about getting a well paid job or career advancement. Ask about salaries, expat packages, CPF & taxes for expatriate.

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ednacz
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Postby ednacz » Mon, 13 Sep 2010 11:08 pm

Eagle- cheers for the info but I wasn't so much referring to logistics as the overall vibe and environment of the city. Theres so many more people in their 20s and fresh grads making it in HK than here in Sing, and I'd say most my classmates either have gone or know someone who has gone to Hk, while none of my peers had even considered Sing as a post-grad option. HK is just known for having a entry-level friendlier job environment. I'm not saying it's a bad thing, it obviously works out for both respective countries, I'm just saying it's not to be blamed on having a large population on a small land mass.

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Postby bobatealover » Sat, 18 Sep 2010 6:22 pm

I guess there are just too many local fresh grads applying for jobs in Singapore that there's no room for overseas grads (unless you come from an Ivy League!)? Some of my friends just graduated and are still searching for jobs...

But perhaps you could start looking at MNCs? I would think there are more foreigner-friendly given that they should have the budget to hire foreigners? For one, you can look at P&G which is big in Singapore and is expanding. I like this company too as its culture seems pretty good :)

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 18 Sep 2010 8:15 pm

bobatealover wrote:I guess there are just too many local fresh grads applying for jobs in Singapore that there's no room for overseas grads (unless you come from an Ivy League!)? Some of my friends just graduated and are still searching for jobs...

But perhaps you could start looking at MNCs? I would think there are more foreigner-friendly given that they should have the budget to hire foreigners? For one, you can look at P&G which is big in Singapore and is expanding. I like this company too as its culture seems pretty good :)


It's not the companies that won't hire foreign new grads, it's the Ministry of Manpower. Working in Singapore is a two step approval process. First you have to get a job offer and then your prospective employer must file an application for an employment pass for you. Both you AND the employer must qualify, you with the requisite qualifications AND experience and the Employer convincing MOM that they need to hire a foreigner when there are lots of locals with similar qualifications already here. And at the moment, the backlash against foreigners makes it even harder than before. The best advice anybody can give is, get a job in your own country and get around 2 years relevant experience and then try you luck here.

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Postby Strong Eagle » Sun, 19 Sep 2010 8:17 am

ednacz wrote:Eagle- cheers for the info but I wasn't so much referring to logistics as the overall vibe and environment of the city. Theres so many more people in their 20s and fresh grads making it in HK than here in Sing, and I'd say most my classmates either have gone or know someone who has gone to Hk, while none of my peers had even considered Sing as a post-grad option. HK is just known for having a entry-level friendlier job environment. I'm not saying it's a bad thing, it obviously works out for both respective countries, I'm just saying it's not to be blamed on having a large population on a small land mass.


It's the 'vibe' of the government that makes all the difference. And HK will be no different if the people complain... the government will restrict foreign jobs, entry level, too... if that is what is needed.

And, as previously stated, entry level brings only education, if that. Why take a job from a local to give to a foreign entry level. Some vibe.

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Postby ednacz » Mon, 20 Sep 2010 1:57 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:
bobatealover wrote:I guess there are just too many local fresh grads applying for jobs in Singapore that there's no room for overseas grads (unless you come from an Ivy League!)? Some of my friends just graduated and are still searching for jobs...

But perhaps you could start looking at MNCs? I would think there are more foreigner-friendly given that they should have the budget to hire foreigners? For one, you can look at P&G which is big in Singapore and is expanding. I like this company too as its culture seems pretty good :)


It's not the companies that won't hire foreign new grads, it's the Ministry of Manpower. Working in Singapore is a two step approval process. First you have to get a job offer and then your prospective employer must file an application for an employment pass for you. Both you AND the employer must qualify, you with the requisite qualifications AND experience and the Employer convincing MOM that they need to hire a foreigner when there are lots of locals with similar qualifications already here. And at the moment, the backlash against foreigners makes it even harder than before. The best advice anybody can give is, get a job in your own country and get around 2 years relevant experience and then try you luck here.


Not entirely true! Theres a working holiday program from the MOM- fresh grads can apply for and receive a six month working holiday visa. After that you have to get an EP. It's nifty.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 20 Sep 2010 3:15 pm

ednacz wrote:Not entirely true! Theres a working holiday program from the MOM- fresh grads can apply for and receive a six month working holiday visa. After that you have to get an EP. It's nifty.


That's right. And therein lies the problem. Getting the EP. Different kettle of fish altogether. I know several who were working down on Robertson Quay and couldn't get an EP even though they had the Working/holiday visa. In months gone by it was much easier, but now? I wouldn't bet a slug nickle on it.

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Postby sleek182 » Thu, 07 Oct 2010 4:21 pm

Whats the point of the Holiday work permit then which entitles foreign grads to work in Singapore for 6 months. There is always an intention behind it, the government want foreign tallent. The 6 month holiday work permit allows foreign grads to come to Singapore to work and surely with the intention to stay here for a longer period and therefore apply for an EP.

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Postby wcs » Fri, 08 Oct 2010 3:24 am

I agree with your reasoning behind the working holiday visa.

The way it is written up, it seems to be there to allow students to spend a summer or a "gap" semester in singapore, probably for an internship.

I feel that its intent is to let students get a feel for what a great place Singapore is, so that they will want to come back here in the future.

I am unsure as to whether they want the students back right after graduation or in a few years time.

I think that this was the strategic purpose of it. However because of the financial crisis impacts on Singapore and the upcoming election, the tactical position has been to make locals feel that they are valued and get the best deal from their government. Rightly so.

Unfortunately, those at the bottom of the food chain get left hanging. Students, don't add that much at this point in time, get shafted by it. It happens to foreigners who have studied at local unis too. So you are not alone.

I am sure things will swing back around, once a shortage of raw talent occurs.

Having spent a while here job hunting I would say that 6 months is not enough time to get a job unless you have family or contacts here. So don't put off enjoying yourself whilst you are here too. Otherwise you will feel like you wasted your time and money here.

If you went to a good uni, I would suggest contacting your alumni affairs office and ask them to be put in contact with the list of alumni who graduated from your uni 10-15 years ago from Singapore. Network with them. Ask them how they built their career here, ask for any tips, and see how it goes.

From what I have seen with internships here, it is usually when someone from your alma mater is running a business that you have the best shot. If they feel that graduates from that school have an edge over locals, then he or she will be happy to organise an internship to utilise your advantage.

It is a long shot, and there are no guarantees. But you will learn more about Singapore and how to build relationships here by doing that than by sitting in-front of your laptop on a job site! :) At the very least it appears you can think out of the box and take initiative. There are some employers here who would say that already distinguishes you from locals! ;) But obviously that is not the case for all locals.

Best of luck! :)

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Postby sleek182 » Fri, 08 Oct 2010 4:09 pm

Hi wcs

Thanks for your advice, some excellent stuff there. Networking is definitely the way forward, and I am trying to do as much as I can to get my name out there. I had a job offer, however it was really not what i wanted to do and although I understand sacrifices need to made when looking for an entry role, I felt uncomfortable excepting the offer. However I hope something else pops up soon whilst I am here in Singapore.


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