Singapore Expats Forum

Pressurised ? Pressured?

Discuss about the latest news & interesting topics, real life experience or other out of topic discussions with locals & expatriates in Singapore.

User avatar
ozchick
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1001
Joined: Fri, 21 Sep 2007
Location: Germany

Pressurised ? Pressured?

Postby ozchick » Mon, 28 Jun 2010 9:15 pm

I was telling a friend who's in a book reading club about errors in a book that I'm reading. The book has been translated from Swedish to English and maybe that's where the problem is. But she reckons one can refer to a person as being "pressurised" whereas I'm quite certain that when referring to people (unless we're inflating them :wink: ) that they are "pressured".
Could it be that the word has been misused so many times that either word is now ok?The sentence in the book is something like "the police officers felt pressurised by the press to act on the information they'd received".
Sounds very wrong to me.
'Are you trying to tempt me because I come from the land of plenty?'

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34263
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 28 Jun 2010 9:25 pm

I am under the same impression as you are. You can inflate somebody (embolism), or blow up an innertube or fill a scuba tank (pressurized) but to have mentally stressed somebody I think it would be pressured into doing something. I hear pressurized here in Singapore ALL the time, I just took to as with the rest of the grammatical errors that are so common here. Of course I the first to admit my grammar and English in general kinda sucks anyway. The cows never seemed to care. :wink:

User avatar
Strong Eagle
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 10413
Joined: Sat, 10 Jul 2004
Location: Off The Red Dot
Contact:

Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 28 Jun 2010 9:43 pm

Personally, I prefer women that are 'pneumatic' as opposed to 'pressurized'.

User avatar
Bafana
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1393
Joined: Sun, 11 Apr 2004
Location: Singapore

Postby Bafana » Tue, 29 Jun 2010 5:04 am

I am feeling really pressurised by this conversation.

Mind you I kept writing pacific isntead of specific on my uni assignments until third year - That said as an Engineering student that still placed me well above the field.
Be Like Water

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Tue, 29 Jun 2010 5:31 am

Coincidence?

A letter to Private Eye magazine (last issue) highlighted exactly the same point.

i.e. pressurised is a thing done to gases...

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34263
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 29 Jun 2010 7:15 am

Guess I better edit my post then! I'm feeling pressurized right now.........

Whew! Aaaaarrrrgggghhhhh! an SBD. Aaaahhhh, but I'm no longer pressurized! :lol:

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Tue, 29 Jun 2010 4:53 pm

:oops!: :shit:

User avatar
Splatted
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 892
Joined: Sun, 11 Jul 2004

Postby Splatted » Tue, 29 Jun 2010 8:33 pm

I think now's a good time to play a catchy beat......

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtrEN-YKLBM

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Wed, 30 Jun 2010 2:14 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lermqfhhJx4

AC/DC - Rock N' Roll Train


Now that's buzzin :)

tartling
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon, 31 May 2010

Postby tartling » Wed, 30 Jun 2010 5:04 pm

I wouldn't mind a bit of "pressurisation" as long as its pronounced preSHUR and not preZHUR, which really makes my blood boil.

Also, would you orient or orientate yourself in the right direction? And what if you were to use it in a different context? E.g. I wish to get orient(at)ed with that handsome stranger.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Wed, 30 Jun 2010 5:20 pm

You'd say orientated in the UK. Though after some years in the US I found myself saying oriented.

p.s. For the first (ever) time yesterday I saw another major Americanism in an article in a quality UK broadsheet. Rather than write 'It happened on Wednesday', it read 'It happened Wednesday'. This truncation is certainly a recent import...

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34263
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 30 Jun 2010 6:34 pm

Theoretically it is more correct than the British way, I would think. You can't do something on a day as it not a fixed object. I would think, to be totally proper, it should be "during Wednesday as it is a passage of time. Course, with my English, I'm lucky to be able to say Wen is day or is it Whens Day? :???:
Last edited by sundaymorningstaple on Thu, 01 Jul 2010 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Wed, 30 Jun 2010 6:54 pm

Hmmm... it is interesting to me, particularly when you have earlier English phraseology that was taken to the US. Now... it is easy to hear it and assume it is an Americanism. But often it is simply a British 'Victorianism' being reimported.

Referring to trousers as pants in one example. Though I have to say (over)hearing (I wasn't watching ok lol)) the judges on what Not to Wear constantly referring to a pair of trousers as 'pant', as in 'the pant don't go with the outfit' really jarred with my head. Still does!

februus
Regular
Regular
Posts: 83
Joined: Fri, 09 Apr 2010
Location: Bukit Batok, Singapore

Postby februus » Thu, 01 Jul 2010 12:35 pm

JR8 wrote:Hmmm... it is interesting to me, particularly when you have earlier English phraseology that was taken to the US. Now... it is easy to hear it and assume it is an Americanism. But often it is simply a British 'Victorianism' being reimported.

Referring to trousers as pants in one example. Though I have to say (over)hearing (I wasn't watching ok lol)) the judges on what Not to Wear constantly referring to a pair of trousers as 'pant', as in 'the pant don't go with the outfit' really jarred with my head. Still does!


Spot on, American vocabulary is more faithful to the original English than modern English itself. (sadly) I remember quite a furore when sulphur was changed to sulfur on the basis it was an Americanism (neglecting the fact that Shakespeare spelled it sulfur).

The one that really gets me going, is soccer. The original derivation is from association football, with association being abbreviated to soccer in England, before the game became more popular stateside. It is used more in America as a convenient differentiator to (American) football.

I make a point of saying soccer whenever I can, just to be falsely accused of getting it wrong. On reflection, that probably makes me a bit sad...

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Thu, 01 Jul 2010 3:23 pm

Well I find it interesting...

Maybe we should both head for the coat-rack, as they say... :)


Return to “General Discussions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest