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Incidents re: Children in Singapore - Urban Legend?

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nakatago
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Postby nakatago » Sun, 20 Jun 2010 8:39 pm

Plavt wrote:Nakatago, the story around Bob Patefield is the kind of nonsense that happens all too frequently in Britain which is getting too much like America - ask a question or indulge in some hobby or favourite pastime and somehow your a number one terrorist suspect!


You're preaching to the choir; although I hear photographers are really treated badly in London. Hopefully, for all its unpopular views on governance, Singapore won't have something similar.

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Postby x9200 » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 8:37 am

anneteoh wrote:appropriate for chavasi to ring the alarm bells.
She is cBavasi.

As a side -track, when it comes to emergency situations, I found the police really inept. I once left my car keys in the Buick somewhere in the USA with the windows all shut except for one with a slight opening. I had everything inside the car. Luckily, I was in a rest area. Called the police and half a dozen turned up. They took notes, phoned etc, taking hours. After hours of consultations, they said I should walk to the nearest Buick master plant and ask for a copy of the key. Earlier on, I had spoken to a family in a travelling caravan - the guy came to help. He took a clothes hanger, inserted it through the top chink and pulled the door handle. Then he used the hanger to hook up the keys. He said the police never helps when help's needed.

In other words you engaged them for the case where was no emergency at all instead of calling a repairmen or a mechanic or just smashing a window. Hard to believe they did not suggest this kind of option during these hours you waited for their action. And yet you are complaining how inept they were to solve your private and trivial problems . If you call them on the emergency line you should be fined.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 9:01 am

x9200 wrote:
anneteoh wrote:appropriate for chavasi to ring the alarm bells.
She is cBavasi.

As a side -track, when it comes to emergency situations, I found the police really inept. I once left my car keys in the Buick somewhere in the USA with the windows all shut except for one with a slight opening. I had everything inside the car. Luckily, I was in a rest area. Called the police and half a dozen turned up. They took notes, phoned etc, taking hours. After hours of consultations, they said I should walk to the nearest Buick master plant and ask for a copy of the key. Earlier on, I had spoken to a family in a travelling caravan - the guy came to help. He took a clothes hanger, inserted it through the top chink and pulled the door handle. Then he used the hanger to hook up the keys. He said the police never helps when help's needed.

In other words you engaged them for the case where was no emergency at all instead of calling a repairmen or a mechanic or just smashing a window. Hard to believe they did not suggest this kind of option during these hours you waited for their action. And yet you are complaining how inept they were to solve your private and trivial problems . If you call them on the emergency line you should be fined.


She's lucky they even entertained her at all. She should have rung up a locksmith, not the police. :roll:

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Postby morenangpinay » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 10:04 am

i saw a police car the other day..it was on the curve with a private car. i think it scratched the police car and later two other police cars arrived. must be hell to scratch a police car here

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Postby nakatago » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 10:10 am

morenangpinay wrote:i saw a police car the other day..it was on the curve with a private car. i think it scratched the police car and later two other police cars arrived. must be hell to scratch a police car here


not as bad as this.

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Postby missis » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 10:57 am

anneteoh wrote:
ksl wrote:


As a side -track, when it comes to emergency situations, I found the police really inept. I once left my car keys in the Buick somewhere in the USA with the windows all shut except for one with a slight opening. I had everything inside the car. Luckily, I was in a rest area. Called the police and half a dozen turned up. They took notes, phoned etc, taking hours. After hours of consultations, they said I should walk to the nearest Buick master plant and ask for a copy of the key. Earlier on, I had spoken to a family in a travelling caravan - the guy came to help. He took a clothes hanger, inserted it through the top chink and pulled the door handle. Then he used the hanger to hook up the keys. He said the police never helps when help's needed.


You mean the police didn't fine you for completely wasting their time?

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Postby x9200 » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 12:05 pm

morenangpinay wrote:i saw a police car the other day..it was on the curve with a private car. i think it scratched the police car and later two other police cars arrived. must be hell to scratch a police car here

I'd rather have a collision with a police car in Singapore than in majority of other countries including US and EU.

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Postby nakatago » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 1:06 pm

I just realized my avatar is related to the topic, especially police cars. :cool:

anneteoh

Postby anneteoh » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 2:22 pm

Plavt wrote:
anneteoh wrote:
As a side -track, when it comes to emergency situations, I found the police really inept.


I doubt that many police forces in the world would consider somebody locking themselves out of their car an emergency, hardly life threatening is it? :roll:


It wasn't a scatty domestic lock-out. I was travelling, the brand new Buick was fully automated and I was in the middle of nowhere - imagine the size of the US. I was with my daughter who's six then, I had nothing with me as everything was inside the machine. And the keys were staring out from their position on the passenger's seat. It was scary and I still can never thank the kind American family enough whenever that confounding incident is remembered.

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Postby nakatago » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 2:29 pm

anneteoh wrote:
Plavt wrote:
anneteoh wrote:
As a side -track, when it comes to emergency situations, I found the police really inept.


I doubt that many police forces in the world would consider somebody locking themselves out of their car an emergency, hardly life threatening is it? :roll:


It wasn't a scatty domestic lock-out. I was travelling, the brand new Buick was fully automated and I was in the middle of nowhere - imagine the size of the US. I was with my daughter who's six then, I had nothing with me as everything was inside the machine. And the keys were staring out from their position on the passenger's seat. It was scary and I still can never thank the kind American family enough whenever that confounding incident
is remembered.


Well, to be fair to you and other American cops, you called the "middle of nowhere" police. :P :P :P

Cops from Portland, Oregon are different from cops from Jarbidge, Nevada.

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Postby ksl » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 2:50 pm

missis wrote:
anneteoh wrote:
ksl wrote:


As a side -track, when it comes to emergency situations, I found the police really inept. I once left my car keys in the Buick somewhere in the USA with the windows all shut except for one with a slight opening. I had everything inside the car. Luckily, I was in a rest area. Called the police and half a dozen turned up. They took notes, phoned etc, taking hours. After hours of consultations, they said I should walk to the nearest Buick master plant and ask for a copy of the key. Earlier on, I had spoken to a family in a travelling caravan - the guy came to help. He took a clothes hanger, inserted it through the top chink and pulled the door handle. Then he used the hanger to hook up the keys. He said the police never helps when help's needed.


You mean the police didn't fine you for completely wasting their time?


Sorry missis but i never said that, you have the wrong quotation :roll:

anneteoh

Postby anneteoh » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 2:54 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:
x9200 wrote:
anneteoh wrote:appropriate for chavasi to ring the alarm bells.
She is cBavasi.

As a side -track, when it comes to emergency situations, I found the police really inept. I once left my car keys in the Buick somewhere in the USA with the windows all shut except for one with a slight opening. I had everything inside the car. Luckily, I was in a rest area. Called the police and half a dozen turned up. They took notes, phoned etc, taking hours. After hours of consultations, they said I should walk to the nearest Buick master plant and ask for a copy of the key. Earlier on, I had spoken to a family in a travelling caravan - the guy came to help. He took a clothes hanger, inserted it through the top chink and pulled the door handle. Then he used the hanger to hook up the keys. He said the police never helps when help's needed.

In other words you engaged them for the case where was no emergency at all instead of calling a repairmen or a mechanic or just smashing a window. Hard to believe they did not suggest this kind of option during these hours you waited for their action. And yet you are complaining how inept they were to solve your private and trivial problems . If you call them on the emergency line you should be fined.


She's lucky they even entertained her at all. She should have rung up a locksmith, not the police. :roll:


Gosh, you lot are hard and have no compassion. I did not add that I had my daughter who was six then, with me. Also, that we were in the middle of nowehere - in a rest area probably in Oregon or Northern California in giant sequoia region. I think everyone around us said we should call the poilice for help. Isn't what they do - help the public?

I'm pleased to say that our police in London often go out to rescue kittens, and women stranded on motorways with engine failures are their priority.

When I was living behind Orchard road, there used to be day and night commercials, with youngsters dj-ing with music, interviews, contests etc. It was all loudspeakers stuff too. I called the police to complain about noise pollution which continued till well past midnight. They were polite and very helpful - taking on my suggestion that they continued without loudspeakers. It stopped for a while but then continued - Saturday night I believe. Think of all the sleeping children and babies. I had to call the police three times but the loud blasting didn't stop till well past two a.m. That proved that they were not afraid of the police when doing their business in SG. Is it any quieter nowadays?

But, there was less blasting in the late hours after that, except fot the Millennium night when the whole area blasted away till the early hours of 4 a.m.

anneteoh

Postby anneteoh » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 3:10 pm

nakatago wrote:
Plavt wrote:Nakatago, the story around Bob Patefield is the kind of nonsense that happens all too frequently in Britain which is getting too much like America - ask a question or indulge in some hobby or favourite pastime and somehow your a number one terrorist suspect!


You're preaching to the choir; although I hear photographers are really treated badly in London. Hopefully, for all its unpopular views on governance, Singapore won't have something similar.


--- No one's badly treated by the police in London, Nakatago. But the police usually can't do anything until the court has decided. Britain is a nation proud of its civil laws. The police are sometimes frustrated - their stop and search rights are in a muddle. The public and the media are not too kind to the police here. In a few exceptions, like the photographer suspected of doing terrorist reconnoitre work being told off.

But we seem to have a lot of them on the walk these days - London must rate as one of the most crime ridden cities these days.

In France the police is inconspicuous. I believe it's the same in SG. Never seen a police on any street when I lived there.

In the small town where my house is. the police shut their doors all day and night. The only time they were out was when they had to do the breathylising tests on drivers.

anneteoh

Postby anneteoh » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 3:22 pm

ksl wrote:
missis wrote:
Sorry missis but i never said that, you have the wrong quotation :roll:



Don't worry KSL. There're technology lapses sometimes outside our controls. I think you're a nice guy. So have a great day everyday.

anneteoh

Postby anneteoh » Mon, 21 Jun 2010 3:26 pm

nakatago wrote:[

Well, to be fair to you and other American cops, you called the "middle of nowhere" police. :P :P :P

Cops from Portland, Oregon are different from cops from Jarbidge, Nevada.


Yes, that accounts for everything everywhere. It's impossible to generalise though there is a general truth which is something that's pervasive.


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