Singapore Expats Forum

I want to work in Singapore. Unrealistic?

Discuss about getting a well paid job or career advancement. Ask about salaries, expat packages, CPF & taxes for expatriate.

tennisdude818
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun, 06 Jun 2010

I want to work in Singapore. Unrealistic?

Postby tennisdude818 » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 12:58 am

I graduated from college in 2009 in the US, and I want to get into banking/finance. I currently have a temporary contract position with a major bank, but the job is far from flashy. So I'm still looking for entry level work while I keep my current job, and I really want to work in Singapore. Is it a waste of time to look for work in Singapore from the US? Is it a waste of money for me to hire a recruiting agency to help me?

So be brutally honest. As much as I want to work and live in Singapore, I want to know if the search would be a waste of time and money. If it's reasonable to expect success, I would immediately work on getting a visa and perhaps hiring a reputable recruiter.

Thanks.

User avatar
Medha
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu, 02 Oct 2008
Location: Singapore

Postby Medha » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 2:47 am

The job market in SG now is hot. There are many jobs available now. I am not sure what is your concern. You can always try to apply online. The hiring company will help you in getting the work permit. Good Luck to you.
Fun and interesting :)

tennisdude818
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun, 06 Jun 2010

Postby tennisdude818 » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 3:56 am

Thanks for the reply. My concern is the fact that I'm searching from the US rather than from within Singapore. Is that a normal situation? Do you just interview over Skype?

serve_the_servants
Regular
Regular
Posts: 58
Joined: Tue, 30 Mar 2010
Location: Europe / Singapore

Postby serve_the_servants » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 6:48 am

I have the same question.

How are interviews been done, using Skype? Video chat? I heard from some people on this forum that they got a job by applying while abroad so it should be possible I guess!

My first plan was to come to Singapore to find a job around december. Now the Euro is down to its lowest point, diminishing my budget heavily, I have to shift gears and apply while I am working in Europe.

Right now my LPR application is pending, but I do not want to bet on one horse given the current pr policies.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35167
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 9:25 am

While not wanting to diss Medha, the following link will give you an idea of the upstream swim you are going to need to accomplish in order to fulfil your dream.

http://www.todayonline.com/Singapore/ED ... itizenship

While the above article refers to new PR's & Citizens, it is actually true for Employment Passes and Work Permit/S pass holders as well.

While you are not interested in Work Permits, with effect of 1 June the new WP levies have gone up considerably, as have S Pass levies. This makes it more expensive to hire foreigners thereby hitting the employers bottom line. While EP holder's don't have levies (Q & P passes) They still have to get by the strengthened criteria for acceptance by MOM both from an academic standpoint and from an Employers "Need" to hire a Foreigner if there are Locals available who can do the job just as well.

A new graduate (which is what you are) doesn't have anything to bring to the table to be able to convince MOM that you skillset is rare, niche or sufficiently new to be able to compete with a local for a salary that would be half or less than what you would require.

This isn't what you want to hear, I know, but it is a brutal assessment of the current job market at the moment. Given the noise from the ground here, until the elections are over, sometime next year, I don't see a loosening up of the job market for foreigners. Having said that, the financial/banking industries are picking up rapidly, but unless you just want to take a vacations and do an exploratory trip here and combine it with a job search, I'd recommend submission to the local job boards and direct applications before coming here.

Regardless of your decision, good luck.

sms

tennisdude818
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun, 06 Jun 2010

Postby tennisdude818 » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 10:16 am

I see, that does look tough. I basically am just an entry level finance major. The only unique thing I could bring to the table would be passing the Japanese Language Proficiency Test this December, but I'm not sure if there is any demand for that in Singapore.

Big Mac
Regular
Regular
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun, 25 Apr 2010

Postby Big Mac » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 10:18 am

i would have to agree with SMS said. Banking/finance roles are definitely picking up as a couple of banks have recently decided to bulk up/relocate their austrasia operation to singapore. However i do not like your chances of securing a job as a recent graduate.

Having said that, it probably doesnt hurt to just apply online and get your cv out there. I wouldn't recommend paying a recruitment agency (n in fact i have never heard of an employee paying), however there are quite a few recruitment agencies online which you can try engage.

As with most things, where is a will there is a way. Good luck with it

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35167
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 10:41 am

Big Mac, (I was going to shorten it to BM but it has other connotations!),

Just for the record, Recruitment agencies are legally prevented from charging a Job Seeker a recruitment commission for a job placement as the law here only allow the agency to charge the Client company. Recruitment firms here find people for employers and not employers for people. :wink:

Big Mac
Regular
Regular
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun, 25 Apr 2010

Postby Big Mac » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 6:01 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Big Mac, (I was going to shorten it to BM but it has other connotations!),



dont worry, BM is generally what my lazy frens use to call me

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Just for the record, Recruitment agencies are legally prevented from charging a Job Seeker a recruitment commission for a job placement as the law here only allow the agency to charge the Client company. Recruitment firms here find people for employers and not employers for people. :wink:


yeah i have never heard of employees paying for the service. However i would have to respectfully disagree with your second statement sms. I have known of people approaching headhunters here and them finding a suitable employer. In fact my gfriend is a good example where she got her role via contacting an recruitment agency and then it led to the job offer.

tennisdude818
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun, 06 Jun 2010

Postby tennisdude818 » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 7:00 pm

I haven't looked into the recruiting thing much yet. I knew that some people paid in China, but that's all. As for finding work, perhaps Australia is a better decision. I mostly wanted to get in that general area of the world while I learn business level Japanese and Mandarin, and then use that to put myself in higher demand.

If only Japan's economy wasn't a total disaster.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 35167
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 06 Jun 2010 7:30 pm

Big Mac wrote:I have known of people approaching headhunters here and them finding a suitable employer. In fact my gfriend is a good example where she got her role via contacting an recruitment agency and then it led to the job offer.


Sure, it's happened. But that is the exception and not the rule. Most applicants are fruit on a shelf. They have a limited useful date. If a consultant has a list of clients who "might" be looking for someone in that niche, a good consultant will shop the CV out just in case they get a nibble. But they won't spend an inordinate amount of time doing so, as it is debatable as to whether or not it will produce any fruit. For a consultant, time is money, and a JD is the only sure guarantee of money.

Feel free to disagree with me, but after 14 years as a engineering headhunter in the oil & gas/Pharm/Constr industries I know it occasionally happens, I do the same thing if I get a good CV, but I don't spend time on it as I only have so many hours in a date to earn a living. Spec CV's? Sometimes you get lucky. :cool:

User avatar
carteki
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1237
Joined: Mon, 28 Apr 2008
Location: Singapore
Contact:

Postby carteki » Mon, 07 Jun 2010 11:29 am

Seriously - at the moment entry level positions are hard to find here (and even harder to get visas for). My suggestion is get some serious experience under your belt and then look at coming here. Identify an employer in the US with whom you can transfer here and try and work for them. There is no harm in sending your cv over - but don't expect anything.

If you're still insist on coming over here your best option would probably be to do an MBA with one of the institutions here. They are well connected (the good ones) and will help you when you're done. The other alternative is to work as an intern to get your foot in the door.

Good luck.

Big Mac
Regular
Regular
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun, 25 Apr 2010

Postby Big Mac » Mon, 07 Jun 2010 11:13 pm

SMS - dont disagree that it might not be the norm but i guess it does happen and quite frequently in my industry. I would agree though that especially for entry level this methodology definitely wont be the right approach but no harm in trying i guess.

tennisdude818
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun, 06 Jun 2010

Postby tennisdude818 » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 7:53 am

Thanks for the honest answers guys. It would be ideal to get experience first here in the US and then transfer, but there are no jobs here either. The job search has been awful, that's why I have this annoying temp job right now. As much as I'd like to be an expat, the hurdles stated in this topic are a common barrier with many countries besides Singapore.

It seems like the only country with a market for entry level foreigners is China. It's possible to teach English there for a bit and then take a job in a small credit union or something like that. That doesn't excite me, but it may be the only option for people like me.

User avatar
Mad Scientist
Director
Director
Posts: 3459
Joined: Thu, 03 Dec 2009
Location: TIMBUKTU

Postby Mad Scientist » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 6:25 pm

you said you are getting your Japanese Proficiency Test in Dec.

Have you tried Japan ? Some of friends went there but became teachers for wee bit. Money is good.

At least you can job hunt into financial sector once there
The positive thinker sees the invisible, feels the intangible, and achieves the impossible.Yahoo !!!


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Careers & Jobs in Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests