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SIA cabin crew

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zoergal
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hihihi

Postby zoergal » Tue, 25 Apr 2006 5:50 pm

Any guys and gers having training on the 26th of May .... :lol:
Hope to see your reply....
:wink:

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sQ-StEwaRd-ShazNi
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Postby sQ-StEwaRd-ShazNi » Tue, 25 Apr 2006 8:59 pm

Brian CZC wrote:Lost my previous account :/ I think I was Bri@n or something like that. The one with the Thalassemea problem :?

Here I am, trying for the Nth time. I've still very interested in becoming a Cabin Crew but think I'll fail this time round AGAIN... rough and scarry face... what to expect right? But I'm not giving up yet. I'm only 24 years old! Going to treat this as an "interview experience" and hopefully,SIA can see my determination and consider me. If not... 2 months later loh :cry:

In the mean time people, DON'T GIVE UP!!!

Good luck to the ladies on Saturday and the guys on Sunday. I need some luck on Sunday too... :???:




Dude,I'm really inspired by you....Failed for 9 times and yet you're still trying....Wow Brian...Good luck to you....ALL THE BEST KAY!!

Rough and scarry face...What do you mean by that?
Like the HULK??
Or just stubborn acne?

Man...I believe you'll get in this time.....I'll pray for you..
:D :D :D :D :D
In order to receive,you have to believe that you have received. (The Secret)

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Postby Brian CZC » Tue, 25 Apr 2006 9:32 pm

sQ-StEwaRd-ShazNi wrote:
Brian CZC wrote:Lost my previous account :/ I think I was Bri@n or something like that. The one with the Thalassemea problem :?

Here I am, trying for the Nth time. I've still very interested in becoming a Cabin Crew but think I'll fail this time round AGAIN... rough and scarry face... what to expect right? But I'm not giving up yet. I'm only 24 years old! Going to treat this as an "interview experience" and hopefully,SIA can see my determination and consider me. If not... 2 months later loh :cry:

In the mean time people, DON'T GIVE UP!!!

Good luck to the ladies on Saturday and the guys on Sunday. I need some luck on Sunday too... :???:




Dude,I'm really inspired by you....Failed for 9 times and yet you're still trying....Wow Brian...Good luck to you....ALL THE BEST KAY!!

Rough and scarry face...What do you mean by that?
Like the HULK??
Or just stubborn acne?

Man...I believe you'll get in this time.....I'll pray for you..
:D :D :D :D :D


[-X [-X [-X
Nth time =/= Ninth time :lol:
It means I forgot how many times liao :P
At least the HULK had SMOOTH, ONE TONE skin leh... mine is rough (imagine orange) and dark scar spots :/

And thanks. Study hard and do well for your studies! (if I remember correctly)

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Postby sQ-StEwaRd-ShazNi » Tue, 25 Apr 2006 11:23 pm

No problem man..

I'm close behind....
Even the best fall sometimes..
:wink: :wink: :wink: :wink:

Make your first impression and give it all out like you're dying for the job...

Put on an enthusiastic face....
Follow your goal..............
In order to receive,you have to believe that you have received. (The Secret)

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..

Postby Cheesie » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 1:08 am

hI FA wannabes.. I just met my SQ friend! Humpz.. she say that on this sat, SIA are taking in 200 peoples only.. and as for those on jan walk-in but havent got their training dates ones, DUN worries.. cos they now not enough trainer to train, so got to wait.. so i doubt this coming sat interview would be fast! Might be dragging bout 1 whole month.. mmm the training too... :shock:

This is what i heard from my friend who now having training... COrrect me if wrong infomations.. :oops:

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Re: ..

Postby Twinklez27 » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 2:01 am

Cheesie wrote:hI FA wannabes.. I just met my SQ friend! Humpz.. she say that on this sat, SIA are taking in 200 peoples only.. and as for those on jan walk-in but havent got their training dates ones, DUN worries.. cos they now not enough trainer to train, so got to wait.. so i doubt this coming sat interview would be fast! Might be dragging bout 1 whole month.. mmm the training too... :shock:

This is what i heard from my friend who now having training... COrrect me if wrong infomations.. :oops:


oh my god!! which means if the turn out rate is almost the same as the last recruitment drive..which totals up to almost 2000 people..it will mean that...only 1 out of a group of 10 will be selected..that is the worst scenario! :shock:

let's pray it will not be a chaos on that day~! :cry:

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Re: SIA Cabin crew

Postby Twinklez27 » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 2:12 am

Greenlife wrote:Dear all,

I'm glad to see the SIA conduct their cabin crew exercise on this coming weekend. Unfortunatelly, I unable to attend because I was not in singapore. I'm actually same with you guys.....desperate to be SIA cabin crew. In fact, I did went to their last walk in interview at Feb 06. That was my first time apply for SIA cabin crew. I knows some of you has been kept trying few times. I would said sometimes it's really depend on you luck. Too bad, I was failed at the first round whereby need to give self intro. My group was 10 guys...only 4 success to proceed 2nd stage.
Wondering how long i need to wait if I miss the opportunity....
anyway, I'm 27 years old, do you think they will employ me instead?
for those really hope to pass the interview, my advise is you need to be serious, SMILES and confidence when you speak. If you are guys, dress code should be long pant and shirt with tie. Do some homework before attend.

Good luck!!! :D

Greenlife


Hi greenlife..i think maybe you can consider to work on your english as well..that will help you tremendously for your next interview~ GAMBATE! :wink:

This is just a piece of advice from me..hope you are not offended~ :D

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Re: ..

Postby Plavt » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 3:26 am

Twinklez27 wrote:
oh my god!! which means if the turn out rate is almost the same as the last recruitment drive..which totals up to almost 2000 people..it will mean that...only 1 out of a group of 10 will be selected..that is the worst scenario! :shock:



Then it is time to do some serious thinking. First of all ask yourself just how badly you want this job. Should it be something you are serious about plan your application. That means find out what the job requires, research human behaviour (nothing in great depth just everyday situations), visit the airport, route out current crew and talk to them, go on a flight if you can even if it is only a short one (if possible come back on the same plane - little hint). That way you will at least get access to the restricted areas of the airports and can view the facilities. Remember this is a popular job which attracts much competition so only genuine applicants who show interest and careful consideration will succeed.

Plavt.

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Re: ..

Postby pandora » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 11:32 am

Plavt wrote:
Twinklez27 wrote:
oh my god!! which means if the turn out rate is almost the same as the last recruitment drive..which totals up to almost 2000 people..it will mean that...only 1 out of a group of 10 will be selected..that is the worst scenario! :shock:



Then it is time to do some serious thinking. First of all ask yourself just how badly you want this job. Should it be something you are serious about plan your application. That means find out what the job requires, research human behaviour (nothing in great depth just everyday situations), visit the airport, route out current crew and talk to them, go on a flight if you can even if it is only a short one (if possible come back on the same plane - little hint). That way you will at least get access to the restricted areas of the airports and can view the facilities. Remember this is a popular job which attracts much competition so only genuine applicants who show interest and careful consideration will succeed.

Plavt.


Plavt is right. Do some research. Talk to people, friends, friends of friends, friends of friends of friends, who are in the industry. Observe the FAs at the airport, etc. All these will come in very handy during the interview. Also, if you are an introvert, perhaps it's time to learn to open up and talk to strangers? Shyness will not help you at all. Cause during the interview, and even while you are waiting to be interviewed, you will be observed and evaluated there and then. As FAs, who are the frontliners and face of an airline, you will be observed by people all the time, hence how you carry yourself plays a vital role.

A tip... when you are interviewed, try not to say things like you enjoy travelling, would like to make a lot of $$$, bla bla bla. Those are the perks, yes??? And we know many are attracted by that. Who doesn't want to be paid to travel the world? But then again, that should not be the main reason why you wanna fly. They are looking for people with a genuine interest in people, passion to serve (hospitality), excellent customer service, desire to make people feel at home and comfortable, work well in a team (teamwork), etc. Remember, you are competing with many for limited vacancies, hence you need to show the interviewers that you are the best man/ woman for the job.

Looks do not apply 100% here. Being pretty/ good looking helps, of course, but it does not guarantee you the job. Don't leave your charisma, positive attitude and charm at home. You can look like Ms Universe. But if your attitude sucks... you are out the door.

Language (English, being the main lang for communication) is equally important. You must be able to communicate clearly and fluently.

All the best this weekend you guys and gals!
Be mild with the mild, shrewd with the crafty, confiding to the honest, rough to the ruffian, and a thunderbolt to the liar. But in all this, never be unmindful of your own dignity. - John Brown

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Postby topgun » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 12:33 pm

I think sometimes the posters here get too caught up in the whole marketing hype regarding the "glamourous" lifestyles of a cabin crew. No question, you certainly get to travel and see more countries/places than any ordinary folk would in their lifetime. But, i know many cabin crew personally (as a technical crew myself) and i find a lot bitter, superficial people amongst these (after a few years of flying). Many times, they would rather not fly and instead settle for an ordinary ground job. However, once you get entrenched into the cycle of things as a cabin crew, you find it hard to break out of that (not least the pay) and get back into the 9-5 scheme of things. (in the real world).

Sometimes, people say the flying crew live in a world of their own. And i do concur with that. It's very hard to maintain a normal lifestyle while in Singapore when you aren't flying. And those with partners have it worse, trust me. It's a tough job being a cabin crew so my best piece of advice is to think about what you really want 5 years down the road or more, in your career path.

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Postby chai ching » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 1:55 pm

Wow.... you really talk that so well. Applause for you. =D> Yup totally agree it with you also of what you posted here. But for me in this case, im totally and mentally prepare for it for this post of being a cabin crew. By the way, you arent a cabin crew right?

topgun wrote:I think sometimes the posters here get too caught up in the whole marketing hype regarding the "glamourous" lifestyles of a cabin crew. No question, you certainly get to travel and see more countries/places than any ordinary folk would in their lifetime. But, i know many cabin crew personally (as a technical crew myself) and i find a lot bitter, superficial people amongst these (after a few years of flying). Many times, they would rather not fly and instead settle for an ordinary ground job. However, once you get entrenched into the cycle of things as a cabin crew, you find it hard to break out of that (not least the pay) and get back into the 9-5 scheme of things. (in the real world).

Sometimes, people say the flying crew live in a world of their own. And i do concur with that. It's very hard to maintain a normal lifestyle while in Singapore when you aren't flying. And those with partners have it worse, trust me. It's a tough job being a cabin crew so my best piece of advice is to think about what you really want 5 years down the road or more, in your career path.

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Postby VT » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 3:29 pm

topgun wrote:I think sometimes the posters here get too caught up in the whole marketing hype regarding the "glamourous" lifestyles of a cabin crew. No question, you certainly get to travel and see more countries/places than any ordinary folk would in their lifetime. But, i know many cabin crew personally (as a technical crew myself) and i find a lot bitter, superficial people amongst these (after a few years of flying). Many times, they would rather not fly and instead settle for an ordinary ground job. However, once you get entrenched into the cycle of things as a cabin crew, you find it hard to break out of that (not least the pay) and get back into the 9-5 scheme of things. (in the real world).

Sometimes, people say the flying crew live in a world of their own. And i do concur with that. It's very hard to maintain a normal lifestyle while in Singapore when you aren't flying. And those with partners have it worse, trust me. It's a tough job being a cabin crew so my best piece of advice is to think about what you really want 5 years down the road or more, in your career path.


Yap...totally agree with you. :) Many are 'stuck' in there for the rest of their lives. Cos after five years, it's difficult to get a job outside. Only higher chances in hospitality industry. And one must be able to take the pay cut which can be almost half. So for those who are used to air crew life, doesn't need to worry about spending on the things you like, most probably they will fly for their whole life.

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Postby Plavt » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 3:43 pm

topgun wrote:I think sometimes the posters here get too caught up in the whole marketing hype regarding the "glamourous" lifestyles of a cabin crew. No question, you certainly get to travel and see more countries/places than any ordinary folk would in their lifetime. But, i know many cabin crew personally (as a technical crew myself) and i find a lot bitter, superficial people amongst these (after a few years of flying). Many times, they would rather not fly and instead settle for an ordinary ground job. However, once you get entrenched into the cycle of things as a cabin crew, you find it hard to break out of that (not least the pay) and get back into the 9-5 scheme of things. (in the real world).

Sometimes, people say the flying crew live in a world of their own. And i do concur with that. It's very hard to maintain a normal lifestyle while in Singapore when you aren't flying. And those with partners have it worse, trust me. It's a tough job being a cabin crew so my best piece of advice is to think about what you really want 5 years down the road or more, in your career path.


Welcome to the forum topgun.

This has to be one of the most informative posts here and one that too many people will likely disregard. To me it does not seem a glamorous job at all; you are away from home a good deal of time, as a short-time visitor you do not really see the countries you are in, traversing different time zones is very tiring to say the least. This has to be one of the most stressful jobs around and I have heard more than one flight attendant complain it is very tiring (who wants to do an 18 hour stint to New York?).

No surprise that some are bitter superficial people, how can you relate to a 'normal' lifestyle when they spend so much time away from home. I suspect many the cabin crew members are very lonely people.

These of course are the negative aspects of the job which applicants should consider. The pay and conditions may be better than elsewhere but for some it will soon become more trouble than it is worth.



Plavt.
Last edited by Plavt on Wed, 26 Apr 2006 4:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby vivi » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 4:18 pm

Plavt wrote:
topgun wrote:I think sometimes the posters here get too caught up in the whole marketing hype regarding the "glamourous" lifestyles of a cabin crew. No question, you certainly get to travel and see more countries/places than any ordinary folk would in their lifetime. But, i know many cabin crew personally (as a technical crew myself) and i find a lot bitter, superficial people amongst these (after a few years of flying). Many times, they would rather not fly and instead settle for an ordinary ground job. However, once you get entrenched into the cycle of things as a cabin crew, you find it hard to break out of that (not least the pay) and get back into the 9-5 scheme of things. (in the real world).

Sometimes, people say the flying crew live in a world of their own. And i do concur with that. It's very hard to maintain a normal lifestyle while in Singapore when you aren't flying. And those with partners have it worse, trust me. It's a tough job being a cabin crew so my best piece of advice is to think about what you really want 5 years down the road or more, in your career path.


Welcome to the forum topgun.

This has to be one of the most informative posts here and one that too many people will likely disregard. To me it does not seem a glamorous job at all; you are away from home a good deal of time, as a short-time visitor you do not really see the countries you are in, traversing different time zones is very tiring to say the least. This has to be one of the most stressful jobs around and I have heard more than one flight attendant complain it is very tiring (who wants to do an 18 hour stint to New York?).

No surprise that some are bitter superficial people, how can relate to a 'normal' lifestyle when they spend so much time away from home. I suspect many the cabin crew members are very lonely people.

These of course are the negative aspects of the job which applicants should consider. The pay and conditions may be better than elsewhere but for some it will soon become more trouble than it is worth.



Plavt.


Dear Plavt and Topgun, I totally agree. Being a FA is really like a dream. Very often I wonder whether people are pursuing this dream because they really want the job or because everyone is doing it. Do they really understand what the job entails? ? For me, I once have this dream too but as i get older..and erm..wiser, I finally realised that there are so many wonderful opportunities out there. I am happy for those that finally make it but sometimes you have to wonder why is there such a high turnover rate if the job is really that wonderful. Like my friend who just joined emirates, ya she does go places, but for convenience sake the crew usually have to stay near the airport which means far away from city area. Well you can tell people you went here and there but probably only the airport and the area surrounding it. :wink:

To all those hopefuls out there, do think through what you really want and seriously weigh the pros and cons.

Attitude is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than what people do or say. It is more important than appearance, giftedness, or skill.
Charles Swindoll

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Postby pandora » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 4:21 pm

topgun wrote:I think sometimes the posters here get too caught up in the whole marketing hype regarding the "glamourous" lifestyles of a cabin crew. No question, you certainly get to travel and see more countries/places than any ordinary folk would in their lifetime. But, i know many cabin crew personally (as a technical crew myself) and i find a lot bitter, superficial people amongst these (after a few years of flying). Many times, they would rather not fly and instead settle for an ordinary ground job. However, once you get entrenched into the cycle of things as a cabin crew, you find it hard to break out of that (not least the pay) and get back into the 9-5 scheme of things. (in the real world).

Sometimes, people say the flying crew live in a world of their own. And i do concur with that. It's very hard to maintain a normal lifestyle while in Singapore when you aren't flying. And those with partners have it worse, trust me. It's a tough job being a cabin crew so my best piece of advice is to think about what you really want 5 years down the road or more, in your career path.


Glamour is just superficial. And you are right, there are bitter and fake people amongst the crew. However, there are 'good' people there too. Those who love and enjoy what they do. I've seen many who tried to make life difficult for their colleagues up in the air. I've also seen those who have gone out of their way to teach the new ones the ropes. The good, the bad and the ugly; it's a package. You can't really have one without the other.

It's difficult being on your feet 18 hours, sometimes with little rest, cleaning the loo, handling disgruntled passengers, harrassment... you name it, and a cabin crew would have likely experienced it. So yes, it's a tough job and anyone who is even thinking about being a part of it, should seriously consider what they are up against.

But it's not that bad. I'm not playing it down, no way! But, there are always two sides to a coin. The people (or team) you fly with will play a part in determining how long you last in the job, or whether your live becomes a living hell. You will definitely 'grow up' after being on the job for a while; it's an eye-opener.

It's also important to be realistic. After flying (esp. for the ladies)... what's next? The men can fly till they retire, but not so for the females. You must be prepared to make sacrifices. If you have education to fall back on, having completed college or uni, moving on to a 9-5 job is not impossible. Your experience, plus education, will help you secure a reasonable job. Of course... if you marry a rich guy... :twisted: jk.
Be mild with the mild, shrewd with the crafty, confiding to the honest, rough to the ruffian, and a thunderbolt to the liar. But in all this, never be unmindful of your own dignity. - John Brown


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