Univesal Studios should employ people who speak English

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morenangpinay
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Post by morenangpinay » Tue, 27 Apr 2010 11:19 pm

nakatago wrote:
Plavt wrote: However, I would concede the acoustics may well have been the problem having seen the same thing myself ironically perhaps while visiting the Malinta tunnel on Corregidor Island off - guess where? The Philippiines, I don't think I understood a word of what was said for the same reason.
like 0:20-1:10 in this clip? -->http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_kGumHQWTY
i lab his mom sketch. :P my mom does the exact same hmmmm sound lol.

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Post by Global Citizen » Tue, 27 Apr 2010 11:46 pm

morenangpinay wrote:i agree100% you can learn alot from someone's online persona. we have a saying in Filipino "mataas ang lipad mataas ang bagsak"..that means keep of the grass.

I'm rather partial to 'as you sow, so shall you reap,' myself.
Karma's a bitch! :wink:
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Post by raden888 » Tue, 27 Apr 2010 11:52 pm

morenangpinay wrote:i agree100% you can learn alot from someone's online persona. we have a saying in Filipino "mataas ang lipad mataas ang bagsak"..that means keep of the grass.
Shouldn't it be , " we having a saying in Tagalog" :P

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Post by Global Citizen » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 8:41 am

Plavt wrote: Accents can distort words to the point of incomprehension as I am sure you already know since there have been times on SQ flights I haven't been able to understand a pilot's announcement and neither has anybody else there at the time.
True and it doesn't help if the speaker is going very fast. For instance, I often use US based carriers for my travel (yikes!) and even though I have no problem understanding American accents, I sometimes have difficulty making out what the FAs are saying in their announcements because of the rapid-fire delivery. What the hurry is, is anybody's guess.
One man's meat is another's poison.

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Post by nakatago » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 9:13 am

raden888 wrote:
morenangpinay wrote:i agree100% you can learn alot from someone's online persona. we have a saying in Filipino "mataas ang lipad mataas ang bagsak"..that means keep of the grass.
Shouldn't it be , " we having a saying in Tagalog" :P
Some mook from the government had the bright idea of proclaiming Filipino as the national language without bothering to define what it really is. For all intents and purposes, it's Tagalog. In any case, it's a moot point; no use opening that can of worms.

And now, for something completely different. When people say "well, you know what they say," who's "they"?
"A quokka is what would happen if there was an anime about kangaroos."

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Post by BigSis » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 9:24 am

And now, for something completely different. When people say "well, you know what they say," who's "they"?
They're referring to "THE MAN" :D

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Post by Global Citizen » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 9:29 am

But who is "The Man?" :D
One man's meat is another's poison.

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Post by raden888 » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 5:04 pm

nakatago wrote:
Some mook from the government had the bright idea of proclaiming Filipino as the national language without bothering to define what it really is. For all intents and purposes, it's Tagalog. In any case, it's a moot point; no use opening that can of worms.

I love opening cans of worms, so what's going to happen to all of the non-Tagalog speaking Filipinos such as the Visayak or Bajau etc ...Thrown off the cliff and forgotten ? Looks like the Filipino Gahmen copied the Malaysian gahmen policy and is trying to create their very own Bumiputra :shock:

And now, for something completely different. When people say "well, you know what they say," who's "they"?


This is the man :

Image

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nakatago
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Post by nakatago » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 5:54 pm

raden888 wrote: I love opening cans of worms, so what's going to happen to all of the non-Tagalog speaking Filipinos such as the Visayak or Bajau etc ...Thrown off the cliff and forgotten ? Looks like the Filipino Gahmen copied the Malaysian gahmen policy and is trying to create their very own Bumiputra


Filipinos are big with national pride and identity. That's why we proclaim with horns blaring and much fanfare that Lou Diamond Philips, Rob Schneider and Tia Carrera are part Filipino (and that the White House had a Filipino chef). You get the idea.

All dialects are retained, just not declared national. No one's dialect gets ignored unless of course, nobody speaks it anymore.

And there are no plans of having our own version of bumiputra. Like I said in the other thread, as long as you're rich or influential, you have it made.

:wink:

And about THE MAN, in Singers, it's obviously...

DUN DUN DUN...
"A quokka is what would happen if there was an anime about kangaroos."

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Post by x9200 » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 8:54 pm

raden888 wrote: I love opening cans of worms, so what's going to happen to all of the non-Tagalog speaking Filipinos such as the Visayak or Bajau etc ...Thrown off the cliff and forgotten ? Looks like the Filipino Gahmen copied the Malaysian gahmen policy and is trying to create their very own Bumiputra :shock:
Pretty similar situation with possibly different origin/reasoning was in Europe after the fall of Soviet Union. Countries that emerged like Lithuania had some majority speaking in their native languages but also huge "minorities" speaking only Russian. If I recall correctly some of the governments had ideas to grand/confirm citizenship based on the language related tests. It was not that long ago, just few years back. Not sure how was this mess straightened up.

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Post by morenangpinay » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 9:17 pm

i thought The Man is MTV :P

Well each dialect in the Philippines is not ignored. There are Filipinos who don't speak Tagalog/Filipino and only use their dialects. I had to learn Tagalog because I came from the North and we speak Ilocano. Unfortunately what is forgotten and only a few know is the traditional writing system in the Philippines which is Alibata. But I am glad that the traditional Filipino Martial Arts is making a comeback thanks to Bourne Identity. :D

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Post by raden888 » Wed, 28 Apr 2010 9:45 pm

x9200 wrote:
Pretty similar situation with possibly different origin/reasoning was in Europe after the fall of Soviet Union. Countries that emerged like Lithuania had some majority speaking in their native languages but also huge "minorities" speaking only Russian. If I recall correctly some of the governments had ideas to grand/confirm citizenship based on the language related tests. It was not that long ago, just few years back. Not sure how was this mess straightened up.
Yes, the Baltic states probably felt this was just due to all the years Russian was imposed on them during the Soviet era.

China with Mandarin over other regional dialects so too South Africa with Afrikaans during the Apartheid years..

Sometimes, these policies can work in favour in lieu of the nation building process but most of the times the minorities who do not conform are sidelined.

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Post by Global Citizen » Thu, 29 Apr 2010 9:56 am

raden888 wrote:

Sometimes, these policies can work in favour in lieu of the nation building process but most of the times the minorities who do not conform are sidelined.
We share a similar opinion and I've a feeling that we would get along quite well in real life if we were to ever meet.
One man's meat is another's poison.

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Post by MauMau » Tue, 04 May 2010 10:31 am

Funny thing happend the other day when I met an English bloke...

Me: So... where are you from?
Brit: England.

Me: Where's that?
Brit: What do you mean? You don't know where that is?

Me: Nope.
Brit: But you're speaking ENGLISH???!!!???

Me: I know I'm speaking english, I don't know what you are speaking... :)
Brit: &&*%$#

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Post by nakatago » Tue, 04 May 2010 10:35 am

This is a bit from Russell Peters' act about how to try to piss the English off.
MauMau wrote:u"]"]Funny thing happend the other day when I met an English bloke...

Me: So... where are you from?
Brit: England.

Me: Where's that?
Brit: What do you mean? You don't know where that is?

Me: Nope.
Brit: But you're speaking ENGLISH???!!!???

Me: I know I'm speaking english, I don't know what you are speaking... :)
Brit: &&*%$#
"A quokka is what would happen if there was an anime about kangaroos."

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